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See, Hear and Sing 牛仔
 
Branding, Ninety-Six Ranch, 1979.

辛苦工作中的牛仔
内华达州北部的
96牧场(Ninety-Six Ranch)

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在北内华达,处理牧场事务的人不叫牧童 (cowboy) ,叫做牛仔 (buckaroos) buckaroo源自一西班牙字 vaquero (vaca是西班牙字的牛);在加州移民早期,那时加州还是墨西哥的属地,西班牙地主习惯使用vaquero (牧人) 一字来称呼他们的牧人及骑手。Buckaroo即是美国版本的vaquero;时至今日,牛仔意指住在牧场、以马儿代步、负责处理牲口事宜的男人或女人。


In northern Nevada, ranch hands aren't called cowboys, they're called buckaroos. The word "buckaroo" comes from the Spanish word vaquero. (In Spanish, vaca means cow.) In the early days of settling California, when it was still owned by Mexico, the Spanish landowners used vaquero to describe their herdsmen and horsemen. Buckaroo is the American version of vaquero. Today, buckaroos are men and women who ride horses on the range and work with cattle.


A screen shot from 'Buckaroo Theodore Brown Parts a Cow from the Herd.'
您是我的妈妈吗?
牧场上的家
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牛仔
您是我的妈妈吗?
"牧群分类工作"
牧场上的家
"牧群赶拢工作"
你是贝西吗?
"牛仔烙印牛只的工作"


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