Broken Arrow (1950)
断箭

结婚誓言3.jpg

Awarded a Golden Globe for Best Film Promoting International Understanding, this 1950 film catapulted the “Apache Wedding Prayer” into mainstream American weddings. Although the original Western novel “Blood Brother” is largely historically accurate, the vows in the wedding scene between Jeffords (James Stewart) and Sonseeahray (Debra Paget) were created by non-Native author Elliott Arnold.

During the ceremony, chief shaman Nochalo makes a small incision on the index finger of both the bride and groom, presses the two cuts together and binds them with a twisted thong.

As their blood mixes, he sings:

Now for you there is no rain,
For one is shelter to the other.
Now for you there is no sun,
For one is shelter to the other.
Now for you nothing is hard or bad,
For the hardness and badness is taken by one for the other.
Now for you there is no night,
For one is light to the other.
Now for you there is no cold,
For one is warmth to the other.
Now for you the snow has ended always,
For one is protection for the other.
It is that way, from now on, from now on.
Now it is good and there is always good,
And now there is always drink,
And now there is always comfort.
Now there is no loneliness,
Now, forever, forever, there is no loneliness.

As Nochalo sprinkles pollen on both their bowed heads, he tells them, “There are two bodies, but now there is but one blood in both of them, and you are the same person.”