转载请注明出处和作者

编者按:爱思英语网推出全新栏目《佳作欣赏》,旨在为各位网友提供互相、探讨、交流的平台。《佳作欣赏》主要设置以下子栏目:英文写作,英汉互译,方法,人生感悟。除英文写作以外,其余子栏目中英文皆可。如果您有好的作品,请向我们推荐。原创优先,转载作品请注明作者及出处。爱思,因你而精彩;爱思,大家的平台!学习学习

    在线投稿:http www.24en.com/custom/add.html

偶然在网上看到一篇来自中文的英文文章,翻译得不错。顺藤摸瓜,找到了中文。大家可以自己先翻译一下,然后对照人家的翻译,看有什么启发。

原文:

满城尽栽三角梅背后的权界迷失

曾颖

2009-10-23


四川洪雅县秋季绿化工作中,实施了一项“重要行动”:全县机关事业单位的在编干部职工,都必须在自家阳台上或庭院内栽种至少两株三角梅。督查发现未栽种者,将受到通报。”这一“全城遍栽三角梅”的统一行动,实施过程中引发了争议。(据10月22日《华西都市报》)

在媒体报道这条新闻的前一天,四川媒体还报道出另一条与此异曲同工的新闻:成都市温江区全区干部的年终考评材料里将首次增加一个全新内容——国学学习情况,具体考核办法包括“一看二听三问”。这意味着,新都区全区的干部,无论是否有兴趣,都必须在业余时间学习并背诵国学经典,以图能在年终的考核中过关。

从这两则新闻有一个共同点,即是权力侵入私域,如入无人之境。民众种什么植物种或读什么书,那完全是个人的私事,只要他没违反法律也没有影响和伤害到别人的正当权益,任何人都没有资格去过问。

早在很久以前,就有哲学家提出了“群已权界”这个概念,即:公共领域的归公共领域,私人领域的归私人领域,群已权界要分清,任何一点即使形式上的混淆也不能容忍——这可谓现代法治文明的元价值。

但这种现代法治元价值,在我们的社会中,却是比较模糊的。我们每天从报纸电视上看到的种种新闻,可以为我们提供数不清的例子证明当下的中国社会,在群已权界的划分上,还有非常遥远的路要走。

在某些地方,当权者还错误而迷幻地坚持认定权力可以为所欲为,无论是公域还是私域,都肆无忌惮,畅通无阻。今天这里传来消息,说当地政府要求机关事业单位干部职工必须抽什么牌子的烟;明天那里传来新闻,公务人员家属如不按时拆迁就要停职下课。公权可以以任意一个堂而皇之的理由,将私权打翻在地再踏上一只脚。这些理由,在很多时候,都是正面得不能再正面了的,比如三角梅可以美化城市,国学可以提升人的人文素养和修为等。但这种以长官是为是,强制剥夺公民的选择自由所推行东西真的就是那么善那么美吗?

也许有人会说,不就是种两株花的事情吗?咱们是不是太过于吹毛求疵了。但道理的长短,不在乎争议的对象是两株花还是别的什么?我们的国家,曾经走过一段根本不把个人私权当一回事的弯路。公家可以任意占有民众的时间用来读语录做义务劳动,可以在任何时候闯入民众的私宅抓看黄碟的夫妻,可以以任何高大的理由,强迫民众干自己并不情愿的事情。但那样的日子,已经离得越来越远了。为了让它永远不再复返,我们必须斤斤计较,并从一株花一株草开始!

译文:

China's public officials invade private rights

By Zeng Ying
Guest Commentary

Published: October 30, 2009

Chengdu, China — Hongya County in China's southwestern Sichuan province recently launched what it called a "critical campaign" – demanding that all public servants and employees of state-run institutions plant at least two bougainvilleas in the yards or balconies of their homes. Those who failed to carry out this instruction would be reported to their superiors. This unusual command has around considerable dispute, according to local media.

In a separate story with similar connotations, Wenjiang district of Chengdu city in Sichuan has added a new item to the list of review criteria for local cadres' year-end performance evaluations – all civil servants have been requested to study Chinese classics.

As part of their evaluation, their superiors must first examine their study plans and report on their progress; second, listen to their oral presentations; and third, interview them as to how they have practiced the spirit and teachings of the classical literature in their daily work, especially by embodying "harmony."

In both these cases public power has invaded the private domain, as if it were entering an unpopulated land. But what people plant or read are completely personal affairs; as long as they don't break the law or harm the rights of others, no one has the authority to tell them what to do in these areas.

More than a century ago, English philosopher John Stuart Mill wrote a work titled "On Liberty," advocating moral and economic freedom of individuals from the state. In other words, let public officials mind public affairs and let private citizens take care of their personal lives. The two areas should be clearly distinguished; any form of confusion between them is intolerable. This is a fundamental value of modern civilizations under the rule of law.

But such basic values remain vague in Chinese society. Numerous stories in the Chinese media provide examples showing that China still has a long way to go toward respecting such distinctions.  更多信息请访问:http://www.24en.com/

In some places in China, those in power still mistakenly and stubbornly assume that they have the right to freely exercise their power, whether in the public or private domain. One day, the media report that a local government has asked its officials to smoke a particular brand of cigarettes. Another day, the media describe how local civil servants have been threatened with losing their jobs if their family members or relatives refuse to move out of their homes, which some local authority has decided to tear down for a relocation project.

In many cases, public officials in China can freely kick down the people's private rights and then step over them for whatever reason, and in grand style. For instance, bougainvilleas can beautify the county while Chinese classics can perhaps improve people's characters. But are such campaigns – conducted forcibly at the whim of officials, disregarding citizens' freedom of choice – so good and beautiful?

Some Chinese may comment, "Isn't this only about two bougainvilleas?" But the significance of this issue does not lie in the simple matter of the flowers themselves.

This country once took a very deviant course concerning the issue of private rights. Using great excuses, the authorities forced the masses to do things they didn't want to do. Local authorities freely dominated the people's time, forcing them to read quotations from Chairman Mao Zedong and to do "voluntary" labor, for example.

In order to prevent those days from returning, we Chinese need to haggle over every trifle, starting from even a flower or a blade of grass.

(Zheng Ying is a freelance critic on current affairs and a former journalist based in the city of Chengdu in Sichuan province of China. This article is edited and translated from the Chinese by UPI Asia.com)

后记:本文贴出后,收到一些修改意见,但修改后成为Chinglish. 我贴这篇文章的用意,是让大家体会真正的翻译并非逐字对应,而使用灵活的语言表达原文的意思。可以补充,可以调整,可以删减。我对这个译文持肯定态度。当然,外语水平高的,可能还可以做出更好的翻译