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SCENE III. A churchyard; in it a tomb belonging to the Capulets.

Enter PARIS, and his Page bearing flowers and a torch

PARIS

Give me thy torch, boy: hence, and stand aloof:
Yet put it out, for I would not be seen.
Under yond yew-trees lay thee all along,
Holding thine ear close to the hollow ground;
So shall no foot upon the churchyard tread,
Being loose, unfirm, with digging up of graves,
But thou shalt hear it: whistle then to me,
As signal that thou hear'st something approach.
Give me those flowers. Do as I bid thee, go.

PAGE

[Aside] I am almost afraid to stand alone
Here in the churchyard; yet I will adventure.

Retires

PARIS

Sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew,--
O woe! thy canopy is dust and stones;--
Which with sweet water nightly I will dew,
Or, wanting that, with tears distill'd by moans:
The obsequies that I for thee will keep
Nightly shall be to strew thy grave and weep.

The Page whistles

The boy gives warning something doth approach.
What cursed foot wanders this way to-night,
To cross my obsequies and true love's rite?
What with a torch! muffle me, night, awhile.

Retires

Enter ROMEO and BALTHASAR, with a torch, mattock, & c

ROMEO

Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.
Hold, take this letter; early in the morning
See thou deliver it to my lord and father.
Give me the light: upon thy life, I charge thee,
Whate'er thou hear'st or seest, stand all aloof,
And do not interrupt me in my course.
Why I descend into this bed of death,
Is partly to behold my lady's face;
But chiefly to take thence from her dead finger
A precious ring, a ring that I must use
In dear employment: therefore hence, be gone:
But if thou, jealous, dost return to pry
In what I further shall intend to do,
By heaven, I will tear thee joint by joint
And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs:
The time and my intents are savage-wild,
More fierce and more inexorable far
Than empty tigers or the roaring sea.

BALTHASAR

I will be gone, sir, and not trouble you.

ROMEO

So shalt thou show me friendship. Take thou that:
Live, and be prosperous: and farewell, good fellow.

BALTHASAR

[Aside] For all this same, I'll hide me hereabout:
His looks I fear, and his intents I doubt.

Retires

ROMEO

Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And, in despite, I'll cram thee with more food!

Opens the tomb

PARIS

This is that banish'd haughty Montague,
That murder'd my love's cousin, with which grief,
It is supposed, the fair creature died;
And here is come to do some villanous shame
To the dead bodies: I will apprehend him.

Comes forward

Stop thy unhallow'd toil, vile Montague!
Can vengeance be pursued further than death?
Condemned villain, I do apprehend thee:
Obey, and go with me; for thou must die.

ROMEO

I must indeed; and therefore came I hither.
Good gentle youth, tempt not a desperate man;
Fly hence, and leave me: think upon these gone;
Let them affright thee. I beseech thee, youth,
Put not another sin upon my head,
By urging me to fury: O, be gone!
By heaven, I love thee better than myself;
For I come hither arm'd against myself:
Stay not, be gone; live, and hereafter say,
A madman's mercy bade thee run away.

PARIS

I do defy thy conjurations,
And apprehend thee for a felon here.

ROMEO

Wilt thou provoke me? then have at thee, boy!

They fight

PAGE

O Lord, they fight! I will go call the watch.

Exit

PARIS

O, I am slain!

Falls

If thou be merciful,
Open the tomb, lay me with Juliet.

Dies

ROMEO

In faith, I will. Let me peruse this face.
Mercutio's kinsman, noble County Paris!
What said my man, when my betossed soul
Did not attend him as we rode? I think
He told me Paris should have married Juliet:
Said he not so? or did I dream it so?
Or am I mad, hearing him talk of Juliet,
To think it was so? O, give me thy hand,
One writ with me in sour misfortune's book!
I'll bury thee in a triumphant grave;
A grave? O no! a lantern, slaughter'd youth,
For here lies Juliet, and her beauty makes
This vault a feasting presence full of light.
Death, lie thou there, by a dead man interr'd.

Laying PARIS in the tomb

How oft when men are at the point of death
Have they been merry! which their keepers call
A lightning before death: O, how may I
Call this a lightning? O my love! my wife!
Death, that hath suck'd the honey of thy breath,
Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
Thou art not conquer'd; beauty's ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death's pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
O, what more favour can I do to thee,
Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
To sunder his that was thine enemy?
Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
That unsubstantial death is amorous,
And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
And never from this palace of dim night
Depart again: here, here will I remain
With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
Will I set up my everlasting rest,
And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
Here's to my love!

Drinks

O true apothecary!
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

Dies

Enter, at the other end of the churchyard, FRIAR LAURENCE, with a lantern, crow, and spade

FRIAR LAURENCE

Saint Francis be my speed! how oft to-night
Have my old feet stumbled at graves! Who's there?

BALTHASAR

Here's one, a friend, and one that knows you well.

FRIAR LAURENCE

Bliss be upon you! Tell me, good my friend,
What torch is yond, that vainly lends his light
To grubs and eyeless skulls? as I discern,
It burneth in the Capel's monument.

BALTHASAR

It doth so, holy sir; and there's my master,
One that you love.

FRIAR LAURENCE

Who is it?

BALTHASAR

Romeo.

FRIAR LAURENCE

How long hath he been there?

BALTHASAR

Full half an hour.

FRIAR LAURENCE

Go with me to the vault.

BALTHASAR

I dare not, sir
My master knows not but I am gone hence;
And fearfully did menace me with death,
If I did stay to look on his intents.

FRIAR LAURENCE

Stay, then; I'll go alone. Fear comes upon me:
O, much I fear some ill unlucky thing.

BALTHASAR

As I did sleep under this yew-tree here,
I dreamt my master and another fought,
And that my master slew him.

FRIAR LAURENCE

Romeo!

Advances

Alack, alack, what blood is this, which stains
The stony entrance of this sepulchre?
What mean these masterless and gory swords
To lie discolour'd by this place of peace?

Enters the tomb

Romeo! O, pale! Who else? what, Paris too?
And steep'd in blood? Ah, what an unkind hour
Is guilty of this lamentable chance!
The lady stirs.

JULIET wakes

JULIET

O comfortable friar! where is my lord?
I do remember well where I should be,
And there I am. Where is my Romeo?

Noise within

FRIAR LAURENCE

I hear some noise. Lady, come from that nest
Of death, contagion, and unnatural sleep:
A greater power than we can contradict
Hath thwarted our intents. Come, come away.
Thy husband in thy bosom there lies dead;
And Paris too. Come, I'll dispose of thee
Among a sisterhood of holy nuns:
Stay not to question, for the watch is coming;
Come, go, good Juliet,

Noise again

I dare no longer stay.

JULIET

Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.

Exit FRIAR LAURENCE

What's here? a cup, closed in my true love's hand?
Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end:
O churl! drunk all, and left no friendly drop
To help me after? I will kiss thy lips;
Haply some poison yet doth hang on them,
To make die with a restorative.

Kisses him

Thy lips are warm.

First Watchman

[Within] Lead, boy: which way?

JULIET

Yea, noise? then I'll be brief. O happy dagger!

Snatching ROMEO's dagger

This is thy sheath;

Stabs herself

there rust, and let me die.

Falls on ROMEO's body, and dies

Enter Watch, with the Page of PARIS

PAGE

This is the place; there, where the torch doth burn.

First Watchman

The ground is bloody; search about the churchyard:
Go, some of you, whoe'er you find attach.
Pitiful sight! here lies the county slain,
And Juliet bleeding, warm, and newly dead,
Who here hath lain these two days buried.
Go, tell the prince: run to the Capulets:
Raise up the Montagues: some others search:
We see the ground whereon these woes do lie;
But the true ground of all these piteous woes
We cannot without circumstance descry.

Re-enter some of the Watch, with BALTHASAR

Second Watchman

Here's Romeo's man; we found him in the churchyard.

First Watchman

Hold him in safety, till the prince come hither.

Re-enter others of the Watch, with FRIAR LAURENCE

Third Watchman

Here is a friar, that trembles, sighs and weeps:
We took this mattock and this spade from him,
As he was coming from this churchyard side.

First Watchman

A great suspicion: stay the friar too.

Enter the PRINCE and Attendants

PRINCE

What misadventure is so early up,
That calls our person from our morning's rest?

Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, and others

CAPULET

What should it be, that they so shriek abroad?

LADY CAPULET

The people in the street cry Romeo,
Some Juliet, and some Paris; and all run,
With open outcry toward our monument.

PRINCE

What fear is this which startles in our ears?

First Watchman

Sovereign, here lies the County Paris slain;
And Romeo dead; and Juliet, dead before,
Warm and new kill'd.

PRINCE

Search, seek, and know how this foul murder comes.

First Watchman

Here is a friar, and slaughter'd Romeo's man;
With instruments upon them, fit to open
These dead men's tombs.

CAPULET

O heavens! O wife, look how our daughter bleeds!
This dagger hath mista'en--for, lo, his house
Is empty on the back of Montague,--
And it mis-sheathed in my daughter's bosom!

LADY CAPULET

O me! this sight of death is as a bell,
That warns my old age to a sepulchre.

Enter MONTAGUE and others

PRINCE

Come, Montague; for thou art early up,
To see thy son and heir more early down.

MONTAGUE

Alas, my liege, my wife is dead to-night;
Grief of my son's exile hath stopp'd her breath:
What further woe conspires against mine age?

PRINCE

Look, and thou shalt see.

MONTAGUE

O thou untaught! what manners is in this?
To press before thy father to a grave?

PRINCE

Seal up the mouth of outrage for a while,
Till we can clear these ambiguities,
And know their spring, their head, their
true descent;
And then will I be general of your woes,
And lead you even to death: meantime forbear,
And let mischance be slave to patience.
Bring forth the parties of suspicion.

FRIAR LAURENCE

I am the greatest, able to do least,
Yet most suspected, as the time and place
Doth make against me of this direful murder;
And here I stand, both to impeach and purge
Myself condemned and myself excused.

PRINCE

Then say at once what thou dost know in this.

FRIAR LAURENCE

I will be brief, for my short date of breath
Is not so long as is a tedious tale.
Romeo, there dead, was husband to that Juliet;
And she, there dead, that Romeo's faithful wife:
I married them; and their stol'n marriage-day
Was Tybalt's dooms-day, whose untimely death
Banish'd the new-made bridegroom from the city,
For whom, and not for Tybalt, Juliet pined.
You, to remove that siege of grief from her,
Betroth'd and would have married her perforce
To County Paris: then comes she to me,
And, with wild looks, bid me devise some mean
To rid her from this second marriage,
Or in my cell there would she kill herself.
Then gave I her, so tutor'd by my art,
A sleeping potion; which so took effect
As I intended, for it wrought on her
The form of death: meantime I writ to Romeo,
That he should hither come as this dire night,
To help to take her from her borrow'd grave,
Being the time the potion's force should cease.
But he which bore my letter, Friar John,
Was stay'd by accident, and yesternight
Return'd my letter back. Then all alone
At the prefixed hour of her waking,
Came I to take her from her kindred's vault;
Meaning to keep her closely at my cell,
Till I conveniently could send to Romeo:
But when I came, some minute ere the time
Of her awaking, here untimely lay
The noble Paris and true Romeo dead.
She wakes; and I entreated her come forth,
And bear this work of heaven with patience:
But then a noise did scare me from the tomb;
And she, too desperate, would not go with me,
But, as it seems, did violence on herself.
All this I know; and to the marriage
Her nurse is privy: and, if aught in this
Miscarried by my fault, let my old life
Be sacrificed, some hour before his time,
Unto the rigour of severest law.

PRINCE

We still have known thee for a holy man.
Where's Romeo's man? what can he say in this?

BALTHASAR

I brought my master news of Juliet's death;
And then in post he came from Mantua
To this same place, to this same monument.
This letter he early bid me give his father,
And threatened me with death, going in the vault,
I departed not and left him there.

PRINCE

Give me the letter; I will look on it.
Where is the county's page, that raised the watch?
Sirrah, what made your master in this place?

PAGE

He came with flowers to strew his lady's grave;
And bid me stand aloof, and so I did:
Anon comes one with light to ope the tomb;
And by and by my master drew on him;
And then I ran away to call the watch.

PRINCE

This letter doth make good the friar's words,
Their course of love, the tidings of her death:
And here he writes that he did buy a poison
Of a poor 'pothecary, and therewithal
Came to this vault to die, and lie with Juliet.
Where be these enemies? Capulet! Montague!
See, what a scourge is laid upon your hate,
That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love.
And I for winking at your discords too
Have lost a brace of kinsmen: all are punish'd.

CAPULET

O brother Montague, give me thy hand:
This is my daughter's jointure, for no more
Can I demand.

MONTAGUE

But I can give thee more:
For I will raise her statue in pure gold;
That while Verona by that name is known,
There shall no figure at such rate be set
As that of true and faithful Juliet.

CAPULET

As rich shall Romeo's by his lady's lie;
Poor sacrifices of our enmity!

PRINCE

A glooming peace this morning with it brings;
The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head:
Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things;
Some shall be pardon'd, and some punished:
For never was a story of more woe
Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.

Exeunt

帕里斯及侍童携鲜花火炬上。

帕里斯孩子,把你的火把给我;走开,站在远远的地方;还是灭了吧,我不愿给人看见。你到那边的紫杉树底下直躺下来,把你的耳朵贴着中空的地面,地下挖了许多墓穴,土是松的,要是有踉跄的脚步走到坟地上来,你准听得见;要是听见有什么声息,便吹一个唿哨通知我。把那些花给我。照我的话做去,走吧。

侍童(旁白)我简直不敢独自一个人站在这墓地上,可是我要硬着头皮试一下。(退后。)

帕里斯这些鲜花替你铺盖新床;

惨啊,一朵娇红永委沙尘!

我要用沉痛的热泪淋浪,

和着香水浇溉你的芳坟;

夜夜到你墓前散花哀泣,

这一段相思啊永无消歇!(侍童吹口哨)

这孩子在警告我有人来了。哪一个该死的家伙在这晚上到这儿来打扰我在爱人墓前的凭吊?什么!还拿着火把来吗?——让我躲在一旁看看他的动静。(退后。)

罗密欧及鲍尔萨泽持火炬锹锄等上。

罗密欧把那锄头跟铁钳给我。且慢,拿着这封信;等天一亮,你就把它送给我的父亲。把火把给我。听好我的吩咐,无论你听见什么瞧见什么,都只好远远地站着不许动,免得妨碍我的事情;要是动一动,我就要你的命。我所以要跑下这个坟墓里去,一部分的原因是要探望探望我的爱人,可是主要的理由却是要从她的手指上取下一个宝贵的指环,因为我有一个很重要的用途。所以你赶快给我走开吧;要是你不相信我的话,胆敢回来窥伺我的行动,那么,我可以对天发誓,我要把你的骨胳一节一节扯下来,让这饥饿的墓地上散满了你的肢体。我现在的心境非常狂野,比饿虎或是咆哮的怒海都要凶猛无情,你可不要惹我性起。

鲍尔萨泽少爷,我走就是了,决不来打扰您。

罗密欧这才像个朋友。这些钱你拿去,愿你一生幸福。再会,好朋友。

鲍尔萨泽(旁白)虽然这么说,我还是要躲在附近的地方看着他;他的脸色使我害怕,我不知道他究竟打算做出什么事来。(退后。)

罗密欧你无情的泥土,吞噬了世上最可爱的人儿,我要擘开你的馋吻,(将墓门掘开)索性让你再吃一个饱!

帕里斯这就是那个已经放逐出去的骄横的蒙太古,他杀死了我爱人的表兄,据说她就是因为伤心他的惨死而夭亡的。现在这家伙又要来盗尸发墓了,待我去抓住他。(上前)万恶的蒙太古!停止你的罪恶的工作,难道你杀了他们还不够,还要在死人身上发泄你的仇恨吗?该死的凶徒,赶快束手就捕,跟我见官去!

罗密欧我果然该死,所以才到这儿来。年轻人,不要激怒一个不顾死活的人,快快离开我走吧;想想这些死了的人,你也该胆寒了。年轻人,请你不要激动我的怒气,使我再犯一次罪;啊,走吧!我可以对天发誓,我爱你远过于爱我自己,因为我来此的目的,就是要跟自己作对。别留在这儿,走吧;好好留着你的活命,以后也可以对人家说,是一个疯子发了慈悲,叫你逃走的。

帕里斯我不听你这种鬼话;你是一个罪犯,我要逮捕你。

罗密欧你一定要激怒我吗?那么好,来,朋友!(二人格斗。)

侍童哎哟,主啊!他们打起来了,我去叫巡逻的人来!(下。)

帕里斯(倒下)啊,我死了!——你倘有几分仁慈,打开墓门来,把我放在朱丽叶的身旁吧!(死。)

罗密欧好,我愿意成全你的志愿。让我瞧瞧他的脸;啊,茂丘西奥的亲戚,尊贵的帕里斯伯爵!当我们一路上骑马而来的时候,我的仆人曾经对我说过几句话,那时我因为心绪烦乱,没有听得进去;他说些什么?好像他告诉我说帕里斯本来预备娶朱丽叶为妻;他不是这样说吗?还是我做过这样的梦?或者还是我神经错乱,听见他说起朱丽叶的名字,所以发生了这一种幻想?啊!把你的手给我,你我都是登录在恶运的黑册上的人,我要把你葬在一个胜利的坟墓里;一个坟墓吗?啊,不!被杀害的少年,这是一个灯塔,因为朱丽叶睡在这里,她的美貌使这一个墓窟变成一座充满着光明的欢宴的华堂。死了的人,躺在那儿吧,一个死了的人把你安葬了。(将帕里斯放下墓中)人们临死的时候,往往反会觉得心中愉快,旁观的人便说这是死前的一阵回光返照;啊!这也就是我的回光返照吗?啊,我的爱人!我的妻子!死虽然已经吸去了你呼吸中的芳蜜,却还没有力量摧残你的美貌;你还没有被他征服,你的嘴唇上、面庞上,依然显着红润的美艳,不曾让灰白的死亡进占。提伯尔特,你也裹着你的血淋淋的殓衾躺在那儿吗?啊!你的青春葬送在你仇人的手里,现在我来替你报仇来了,我要亲手杀死那杀害你的人。原谅我吧,兄弟!啊!亲爱的朱丽叶,你为什么仍然这样美丽?难道那虚无的死亡,那枯瘦可憎的妖魔,也是个多情种子,所以把你藏匿在这幽暗的洞府里做他的情妇吗?为了防止这样的事情,我要永远陪伴着你,再不离开这漫漫长夜的幽宫;我要留在这儿,跟你的侍婢,那些蛆虫们在一起;啊!我要在这儿永久安息下来,从我这厌倦人世的凡躯上挣脱恶运的束缚。眼睛,瞧你的最后一眼吧!手臂,作你最后一次的拥抱吧!嘴唇,啊!你呼吸的门户,用一个合法的吻,跟网罗一切的死亡订立一个永久的契约吧!来,苦味的向导,绝望的领港人,现在赶快把你的厌倦于风涛的船舶向那巉岩上冲撞过去吧!为了我的爱人,我干了这一杯!(饮药)啊!卖药的人果然没有骗我,药性很快地发作了。我就这样在这一吻中死去。(死。)

劳伦斯神父持灯笼、锄、锹自墓地另一端上。

劳伦斯圣芳济保佑我!我这双老脚今天晚上怎么老是在坟堆里绊来跌去的!那边是谁?

鲍尔萨泽是一个朋友,也是一个跟您熟识的人。

劳伦斯祝福你!告诉我,我的好朋友,那边是什么火把,向蛆虫和没有眼睛的骷髅浪费着它的光明?照我辨认起来,那火把亮着的地方,似乎是凯普莱特家里的坟茔。

鲍尔萨泽正是,神父;我的主人,您的好朋友,就在那儿。

劳伦斯他是谁?

鲍尔萨泽罗密欧。

劳伦斯他来多久了?

鲍尔萨泽足足半点钟。

劳伦斯陪我到墓穴里去。

鲍尔萨泽我不敢,神父。我的主人不知道我还没有走;他曾经对我严辞恐吓,说要是我留在这儿窥伺他的动静,就要把我杀死。

劳伦斯那么你留在这儿,让我一个人去吧。恐惧临到我的身上;啊!我怕会有什么不幸的祸事发生。

鲍尔萨泽当我在这株紫杉树底下睡了过去的时候,我梦见我的主人跟另外一个人打架,那个人被我的主人杀了。

劳伦斯(趋前)罗密欧!嗳哟!嗳哟,这坟墓的石门上染着些什么血迹?在这安静的地方,怎么横放着这两柄无主的血污的刀剑?(进墓)罗密欧!啊,他的脸色这么惨白!还有谁?什么!帕里斯也躺在这儿,浑身浸在血泊里?啊!多么残酷的时辰,造成了这场凄惨的意外!那小姐醒了。(朱丽叶醒。)

朱丽叶啊,善心的神父!我的夫君呢?我记得很清楚我应当在什么地方,现在我正在这地方。我的罗密欧呢?(内喧声。)

劳伦斯我听见有什么声音。小姐,赶快离开这个密布着毒氛腐臭的死亡的巢穴吧;一种我们所不能反抗的力量已经阻挠了我们的计划。来,出去吧。你的丈夫已经在你的怀中死去;帕里斯也死了。来,我可以替你找一处地方出家做尼姑。不要耽误时间盘问我,巡夜的人就要来了。来,好朱丽叶,去吧。(内喧声又起)我不敢再等下去了。

朱丽叶去,你去吧!我不愿意走。(劳伦斯下)这是什么?一只杯子,紧紧地握住在我的忠心的爱人的手里?我知道了,一定是毒药结果了他的生命。唉,冤家!你一起喝干了,不留下一滴给我吗?我要吻着你的嘴唇,也许这上面还留着一些毒液,可以让我当作兴奋剂服下而死去。(吻罗密欧)你的嘴唇还是温暖的!

巡丁甲(在内)孩子,带路;在哪一个方向?

朱丽叶啊,人声吗?那么我必须快一点了结。啊,好刀子!(攫住罗密欧的匕首)这就是你的鞘子;(以匕首自刺)你插了进去,让我死了吧。(扑在罗密欧身上死去。)

巡丁及帕里斯侍童上。

侍童就是这儿,那火把亮着的地方。

巡丁甲地上都是血;你们几个人去把墓地四周搜查一下,看见什么人就抓起来。(若干巡丁下)好惨!伯爵被人杀了躺在这儿,朱丽叶胸口流着血,身上还是热热的好像死得不久,虽然她已经葬在这里两天了。去,报告亲王,通知凯普莱特家里,再去把蒙太古家里的人也叫醒了,剩下的人到各处搜搜。(若干巡丁续下)我们看见这些惨事发生在这个地方,可是在没有得到人证以前,却无法明了这些惨事的真相。

若干巡丁率鲍尔萨泽上。

巡丁乙这是罗密欧的仆人;我们看见他躲在墓地里。

巡丁甲把他好生看押起来,等亲王来审问。

若干巡丁率劳伦斯神父上。

巡丁丙我们看见这个教士从墓地旁边跑出来,神色慌张,一边叹气一边流泪,他手里还拿着锄头铁锹,都给我们拿下来了。

巡丁甲他有很重大的嫌疑;把这教士也看押起来。

亲王及侍从上。

亲王什么祸事在这样早的时候发生,打断了我的清晨的安睡?

凯普莱特、凯普莱特夫人及余人等上。

凯普莱特外边这样乱叫乱喊,是怎么一回事?

凯普莱特夫人街上的人们有的喊着罗密欧,有的喊着朱丽叶,有的喊着帕里斯;大家沸沸扬扬地向我们家里的坟上奔去。

亲王这么许多人为什么发出这样惊人的叫喊?

巡丁甲王爷,帕里斯伯爵被人杀死了躺在这儿;罗密欧也死了;已经死了两天的朱丽叶,身上还热着,又被人重新杀死了。

亲王用心搜寻,把这场万恶的杀人命案的真相调查出来。

巡丁甲这儿有一个教士,还有一个被杀的罗密欧的仆人,他们都拿着掘墓的器具。

凯普莱特天啊!——啊,妻子!瞧我们的女儿流着这么多的血!这把刀弄错了地位了!瞧,它的空鞘子还在蒙太古家小子的背上,它却插进了我的女儿的胸前!

凯普莱特夫人嗳哟!这些死的惨象就像惊心动魄的钟声,警告我这风烛残年,快要不久于人世了。

蒙太古及余人等上。

亲王来,蒙太古,你起来虽然很早,可是你的儿子倒下得更早。

蒙太古唉!殿下,我的妻子因为悲伤小儿的远逐,已经在昨天晚上去世了;还有什么祸事要来跟我这老头子作对呢?

亲王瞧吧,你就可以看见。

蒙太古啊,你这不孝的东西!你怎么可以抢在你父亲的前面,自己先钻到坟墓里去呢?

亲王暂时停止你们的悲恸,让我把这些可疑的事实审问明白,知道了详细的原委以后,再来领导你们放声一哭吧;也许我的悲哀还要远远胜过你们呢!——把嫌疑犯带上来。

劳伦斯时间和地点都可以作不利于我的证人;在这场悲惨的血案中,我虽然是一个能力最薄弱的人,但却是嫌疑最重的人。我现在站在殿下的面前,一方面要供认我自己的罪过,一方面也要为我自己辩解。

亲王那么快把你所知道的一切说出来。

劳伦斯我要把经过的情形尽量简单地叙述出来,因为我的短促的残生还不及一段冗烦的故事那么长。死了的罗密欧是死了的朱丽叶的丈夫,她是罗密欧的忠心的妻子,他们的婚礼是由我主持的。就在他们秘密结婚的那天,提伯尔特死于非命,这位才做新郎的人也从这城里被放逐出去;朱丽叶是为了他,不是为了提伯尔特,才那样伤心憔悴。你们因为要替她解除烦恼,把她许婚给帕里斯伯爵,还要强迫她嫁给他,她就跑来见我,神色慌张地要我替她想个办法避免这第二次的结婚,否则她要在我的寺院里自杀。所以我就根据我的医药方面的学识,给她一服安眠的药水;它果然发生了我所预期的效力,她一服下去就像死了一样昏沉过去。同时我写信给罗密欧,叫他就在这一个悲惨的晚上到这儿来,帮助把她搬出她寄寓的坟墓,因为药性一到时候便会过去。可是替我带信的约翰神父却因遭到意外,不能脱身,昨天晚上才把我的信依然带了回来。那时我只好按照着预先算定她醒来的时间,一个人前去把她从她家族的墓茔里带出来,预备把她藏匿在我的寺院里,等有方便再去叫罗密欧来;不料我在她醒来以前几分钟到这儿来的时候,尊贵的帕里斯和忠诚的罗密欧已经双双惨死了。她一醒过来,我就请她出去,劝她安心忍受这一种出自天意的变故;可是那时我听见了纷纷的人声,吓得逃出了墓穴,她在万分绝望之中不肯跟我去,看样子她是自杀了。这是我所知道的一切,至于他们两人的结婚,那么她的乳母也是与闻的。要是这一场不幸的惨祸,是由我的疏忽所造成,那么我这条老命愿受最严厉的法律的制裁,请您让它提早几点钟牺牲了吧。

亲王我一向知道你是一个道行高尚的人。罗密欧的仆人呢?他有什么话说?

鲍尔萨泽我把朱丽叶的死讯通知了我的主人,因此他从曼多亚急急地赶到这里,到了这座坟堂的前面。这封信他叫我一早送去给我家老爷;当他走进墓穴里的时候,他还恐吓我,说要是我不离开他赶快走开,他就要杀死我。

亲王把那封信给我,我要看看。叫巡丁来的那个伯爵的侍童呢?喂,你的主人到这地方来做什么?

侍童他带了花来散在他夫人的坟上,他叫我站得远远的,我就听他的话;不一会儿工夫,来了一个拿着火把的人把坟墓打开了。后来我的主人就拔剑跟他打了起来,我就奔去叫巡丁。

亲王这封信证实了这个神父的话,讲起他们恋爱的经过和她的去世的消息;他还说他从一个穷苦的卖药人手里买到一种毒药,要把它带到墓穴里来准备和朱丽叶长眠在一起。这两家仇人在哪里?——凯普莱特!蒙太古!瞧你们的仇恨已经受到了多大的惩罚,上天借手于爱情,夺去了你们心爱的人;我为了忽视你们的争执,也已经丧失了一双亲戚,大家都受到惩罚了。

凯普莱特啊,蒙太古大哥!把你的手给我;这就是你给我女儿的一份聘礼,我不能再作更大的要求了。

蒙太古但是我可以给你更多的;我要用纯金替她铸一座像,只要维洛那一天不改变它的名称,任何塑像都不会比忠贞的朱丽叶那一座更为卓越。

凯普莱特罗密欧也要有一座同样富丽的金像卧在他情人的身旁,这两个在我们的仇恨下惨遭牺牲的可怜的人儿!

亲王清晨带来了凄凉的和解,

太阳也惨得在云中躲闪。

大家先回去发几声感慨,

该恕的、该罚的再听宣判。

古往今来多少离合悲欢,

谁曾见这样的哀怨辛酸!(同下。)