字体设置:

SCENE V. Juliet's chamber.

Enter Nurse

Nurse

Mistress! what, mistress! Juliet! fast, I warrant her, she:
Why, lamb! why, lady! fie, you slug-a-bed!
Why, love, I say! madam! sweet-heart! why, bride!
What, not a word? you take your pennyworths now;
Sleep for a week; for the next night, I warrant,
The County Paris hath set up his rest,
That you shall rest but little. God forgive me,
Marry, and amen, how sound is she asleep!
I must needs wake her. Madam, madam, madam!
Ay, let the county take you in your bed;
He'll fright you up, i' faith. Will it not be?

Undraws the curtains

What, dress'd! and in your clothes! and down again!
I must needs wake you; Lady! lady! lady!
Alas, alas! Help, help! my lady's dead!
O, well-a-day, that ever I was born!
Some aqua vitae, ho! My lord! my lady!

Enter LADY CAPULET

LADY CAPULET

What noise is here?

Nurse

O lamentable day!

LADY CAPULET

What is the matter?

Nurse

Look, look! O heavy day!

LADY CAPULET

O me, O me! My child, my only life,
Revive, look up, or I will die with thee!
Help, help! Call help.

Enter CAPULET

CAPULET

For shame, bring Juliet forth; her lord is come.

Nurse

She's dead, deceased, she's dead; alack the day!

LADY CAPULET

Alack the day, she's dead, she's dead, she's dead!

CAPULET

Ha! let me see her: out, alas! she's cold:
Her blood is settled, and her joints are stiff;
Life and these lips have long been separated:
Death lies on her like an untimely frost
Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.

Nurse

O lamentable day!

LADY CAPULET

O woful time!

CAPULET

Death, that hath ta'en her hence to make me wail,
Ties up my tongue, and will not let me speak.

Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and PARIS, with Musicians

FRIAR LAURENCE

Come, is the bride ready to go to church?

CAPULET

Ready to go, but never to return.
O son! the night before thy wedding-day
Hath Death lain with thy wife. There she lies,
Flower as she was, deflowered by him.
Death is my son-in-law, Death is my heir;
My daughter he hath wedded: I will die,
And leave him all; life, living, all is Death's.

PARIS

Have I thought long to see this morning's face,
And doth it give me such a sight as this?

LADY CAPULET

Accursed, unhappy, wretched, hateful day!
Most miserable hour that e'er time saw
In lasting labour of his pilgrimage!
But one, poor one, one poor and loving child,
But one thing to rejoice and solace in,
And cruel death hath catch'd it from my sight!

Nurse

O woe! O woful, woful, woful day!
Most lamentable day, most woful day,
That ever, ever, I did yet behold!
O day! O day! O day! O hateful day!
Never was seen so black a day as this:
O woful day, O woful day!

PARIS

Beguiled, divorced, wronged, spited, slain!
Most detestable death, by thee beguil'd,
By cruel cruel thee quite overthrown!
O love! O life! not life, but love in death!

CAPULET

Despised, distressed, hated, martyr'd, kill'd!
Uncomfortable time, why camest thou now
To murder, murder our solemnity?
O child! O child! my soul, and not my child!
Dead art thou! Alack! my child is dead;
And with my child my joys are buried.

FRIAR LAURENCE

Peace, ho, for shame! confusion's cure lives not
In these confusions. Heaven and yourself
Had part in this fair maid; now heaven hath all,
And all the better is it for the maid:
Your part in her you could not keep from death,
But heaven keeps his part in eternal life.
The most you sought was her promotion;
For 'twas your heaven she should be advanced:
And weep ye now, seeing she is advanced
Above the clouds, as high as heaven itself?
O, in this love, you love your child so ill,
That you run mad, seeing that she is well:
She's not well married that lives married long;
But she's best married that dies married young.
Dry up your tears, and stick your rosemary
On this fair corse; and, as the custom is,
In all her best array bear her to church:
For though fond nature bids us an lament,
Yet nature's tears are reason's merriment.

CAPULET

All things that we ordained festival,
Turn from their office to black funeral;
Our instruments to melancholy bells,
Our wedding cheer to a sad burial feast,
Our solemn hymns to sullen dirges change,
Our bridal flowers serve for a buried corse,
And all things change them to the contrary.

FRIAR LAURENCE

Sir, go you in; and, madam, go with him;
And go, Sir Paris; every one prepare
To follow this fair corse unto her grave:
The heavens do lour upon you for some ill;
Move them no more by crossing their high will.

Exeunt CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, PARIS, and FRIAR LAURENCE

First Musician

Faith, we may put up our pipes, and be gone.

Nurse

Honest goodfellows, ah, put up, put up;
For, well you know, this is a pitiful case.

Exit

First Musician

Ay, by my troth, the case may be amended.

Enter PETER

PETER

Musicians, O, musicians, 'Heart's ease, Heart's
ease:' O, an you will have me live, play 'Heart's ease.'

First Musician

Why 'Heart's ease?'

PETER

O, musicians, because my heart itself plays 'My
heart is full of woe:' O, play me some merry dump,
to comfort me.

First Musician

Not a dump we; 'tis no time to play now.

PETER

You will not, then?

First Musician

No.

PETER

I will then give it you soundly.

First Musician

What will you give us?

PETER

No money, on my faith, but the gleek;
I will give you the minstrel.

First Musician

Then I will give you the serving-creature.

PETER

Then will I lay the serving-creature's dagger on
your pate. I will carry no crotchets: I'll re you,
I'll fa you; do you note me?

First Musician

An you re us and fa us, you note us.

Second Musician

Pray you, put up your dagger, and put out your wit.

PETER

Then have at you with my wit! I will dry-beat you
with an iron wit, and put up my iron dagger. Answer
me like men:
'When griping grief the heart doth wound,
And doleful dumps the mind oppress,
Then music with her silver sound'--
why 'silver sound'? why 'music with her silver
sound'? What say you, Simon Catling?

Musician

Marry, sir, because silver hath a sweet sound.

PETER

Pretty! What say you, Hugh Rebeck?

Second Musician

I say 'silver sound,' because musicians sound for silver.

PETER

Pretty too! What say you, James Soundpost?

Third Musician

Faith, I know not what to say.

PETER

O, I cry you mercy; you are the singer: I will say
for you. It is 'music with her silver sound,'
because musicians have no gold for sounding:
'Then music with her silver sound
With speedy help doth lend redress.'

Exit

First Musician

What a pestilent knave is this same!

Second Musician

Hang him, Jack! Come, we'll in here; tarry for the
mourners, and stay dinner.

Exeunt

乳媪上。

乳媪小姐!喂,小姐!朱丽叶!她准是睡熟了。喂,小羊!喂,小姐!哼,你这懒丫头!喂,亲亲!小姐!心肝!喂,新娘!怎么!一声也不响?现在尽你睡去,尽你睡一个星期;到今天晚上,帕里斯伯爵可不让你安安静静休息一会儿了。上帝饶恕我,阿门,她睡得多熟!我必须叫她醒来。小姐!小姐!小姐!好,让那伯爵自己到你床上来吧,那时你可要吓得跳起来了,是不是?怎么!衣服都穿好了,又重新睡下去吗?我必须把你叫醒。小姐!小姐!小姐!嗳哟!嗳哟!救命!救命!我的小姐死了!嗳哟!我还活着做什么!喂,拿一点酒来!老爷!太太!

凯普莱特夫人上。

凯普莱特夫人吵什么?

乳媪嗳哟,好伤心啊!

凯普莱特夫人什么事?

乳媪瞧,瞧!嗳哟,好伤心啊!

凯普莱特夫人嗳哟,嗳哟!我的孩子,我的唯一的生命!醒来!睁开你的眼睛来!你死了,叫我怎么活得下去?救命!救命!大家来啊!

凯普莱特上。

凯普莱特还不送朱丽叶出来,她的新郎已经来啦。

乳媪她死了,死了,她死了!嗳哟,伤心啊!

凯普莱特夫人唉!她死了,她死了,她死了!

凯普莱特嘿!让我瞧瞧。嗳哟!她身上冰冷的;她的血液已经停止不流,她的手脚都硬了;她的嘴唇里已经没有了生命的气息;死像一阵未秋先降的寒霜,摧残了这一朵最鲜嫩的娇花。

乳媪嗳哟,好伤心啊!

凯普莱特夫人嗳哟,好苦啊!

凯普莱特死神夺去了我的孩子,他使我悲伤得说不出话来。

劳伦斯神父、帕里斯及乐工等上。

劳伦斯来,新娘有没有预备好上教堂去?

凯普莱特她已经预备动身,可是这一去再不回来了。啊贤婿!死神已经在你新婚的前夜降临到你妻子的身上。她躺在那里,像一朵被他摧残了的鲜花。死神是我的新婿,是我的后嗣,他已经娶走了我的女儿。我也快要死了,把我的一切都传给他;我的生命财产,一切都是死神的!

帕里斯难道我眼巴巴望到天明,却让我看见这一个凄惨的情景吗?

凯普莱特夫人倒霉的、不幸的、可恨的日子!永无休止的时间的运行中的一个顶悲惨的时辰!我就生了这一个孩子,这一个可怜的疼爱的孩子,她是我唯一的宝贝和安慰,现在却被残酷的死神从我眼前夺了去啦!

乳媪好苦啊!好苦的、好苦的、好苦的日子啊!我这一生一世里顶伤心的日子,顶凄凉的日子!嗳哟,这个日子!这个可恨的日子!从来不曾见过这样倒霉的日子!好苦的、好苦的日子啊!

帕里斯最可恨的死,你欺骗了我,杀害了她,拆散了我们的良缘,一切都被残酷的、残酷的你破坏了!啊!爱人!啊,我的生命!没有生命,只有被死亡吞噬了的爱情!

凯普莱特悲痛的命运,为什么你要来打破、打破我们的盛礼?儿啊!儿啊!我的灵魂,你死了!你已经不是我的孩子了!死了!唉!我的孩子死了,我的快乐也随着我的孩子埋葬了!

劳伦斯静下来!不害羞吗?你们这样乱哭乱叫是无济于事的。上天和你们共有着这一个好女儿;现在她已经完全属于上天所有,这是她的幸福,因为你们不能使她的肉体避免死亡,上天却能使她的灵魂得到永生。你们竭力替她找寻一个美满的前途,因为你们的幸福是寄托在她的身上;现在她高高地升上云中去了,你们却为她哭泣吗?啊!你们瞧着她享受最大的幸福,却这样发疯一样号啕叫喊,这可以算是真爱你们的女儿吗?活着,嫁了人,一直到老,这样的婚姻有什么乐趣呢?在年轻时候结了婚而死去,才是最幸福不过的。揩干你们的眼泪,把你们的香花散布在这美丽的尸体上,按照着习惯,把她穿着盛装抬到教堂里去。愚痴的天性虽然使我们伤心痛哭,可是在理智眼中,这些天性的眼泪却是可笑的。

凯普莱特我们本来为了喜庆预备好的一切,现在都要变成悲哀的殡礼;我们的乐器要变成忧郁的丧钟,我们的婚筵要变成凄凉的丧席,我们的赞美诗要变成沉痛的挽歌,新娘手里的鲜花要放在坟墓中殉葬,一切都要相反而行。

劳伦斯凯普莱特先生,您进去吧;夫人,您陪他进去;帕里斯伯爵,您也去吧;大家准备送这具美丽的尸体下葬。上天的愤怒已经降临在你们身上,不要再违拂他的意旨,招致更大的灾祸。(凯普莱特夫妇、帕里斯、劳伦斯同下。)

乐工甲真的,咱们也可以收起笛子走啦。

乳媪啊!好兄弟们,收起来吧,收起来吧;这真是一场伤心的横祸!(下。)

乐工甲唉,我巴不得这事有什么办法补救才好。

彼得上。

彼得乐工!啊!乐工,《心里的安乐》,《心里的安乐》!啊!替我奏一曲《心里的安乐》,否则我要活不下去了。

乐工甲为什么要奏《心里的安乐》呢?

彼得啊!乐工,因为我的心在那里唱着《我心里充满了忧伤》。啊!替我奏一支快活的歌儿,安慰安慰我吧。

乐工甲不奏不奏,现在不是奏乐的时候。

彼得那么你们不奏吗?

乐工甲不奏。

彼得那么我就给你们——

乐工甲你给我们什么?

彼得我可不给你们钱,哼!我要给你们一顿骂;我骂你们是一群卖唱的叫化子。

乐工甲那么我就骂你是个下贱的奴才。

彼得那么我就把奴才的刀搁在你们的头颅上。我决不含糊:不是高音,就是低调,你们听见吗?

乐工甲什么高音低调,你倒还得懂这一套。

乐工乙且慢,君子动口,小人动手。

彼得好,那么让我用舌剑唇枪杀得你们抱头鼠窜。有本领的,回答我这一个问题:

悲哀伤痛着心灵,

忧郁萦绕在胸怀,

惟有音乐的银声——

为什么说“银声”?为什么说“音乐的银声”?西门凯特林,你怎么说?

乐工甲因为银子的声音很好听。

彼得说得好!休利培克,你怎么说?

乐工乙因为乐工奏乐的目的,是想人家赏他一些银子。

彼得说得好!詹姆士桑德普斯特,你怎么说?

乐工丙不瞒你说,我可不知道应当怎么说。

彼得啊!对不起,你是只会唱唱歌的;我替你说了吧:因为乐工尽管奏乐奏到老死,也换不到一些金子。 惟有音乐的银声, 可以把烦闷推开。(下。)

乐工甲真是个讨厌的家伙!

乐工乙该死的奴才!来,咱们且慢回去,等吊客来的时候吹奏两声,吃他们一顿饭再走。(同下。)