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SCENE V. Capulet's orchard.

Enter ROMEO and JULIET above, at the window

JULIET

Wilt thou be gone? it is not yet near day:
It was the nightingale, and not the lark,
That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear;
Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate-tree:
Believe me, love, it was the nightingale.

ROMEO

It was the lark, the herald of the morn,
No nightingale: look, love, what envious streaks
Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east:
Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
I must be gone and live, or stay and die.

JULIET

Yon light is not day-light, I know it, I:
It is some meteor that the sun exhales,
To be to thee this night a torch-bearer,
And light thee on thy way to Mantua:
Therefore stay yet; thou need'st not to be gone.

ROMEO

Let me be ta'en, let me be put to death;
I am content, so thou wilt have it so.
I'll say yon grey is not the morning's eye,
'Tis but the pale reflex of Cynthia's brow;
Nor that is not the lark, whose notes do beat
The vaulty heaven so high above our heads:
I have more care to stay than will to go:
Come, death, and welcome! Juliet wills it so.
How is't, my soul? let's talk; it is not day.

JULIET

It is, it is: hie hence, be gone, away!
It is the lark that sings so out of tune,
Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps.
Some say the lark makes sweet division;
This doth not so, for she divideth us:
Some say the lark and loathed toad change eyes,
O, now I would they had changed voices too!
Since arm from arm that voice doth us affray,
Hunting thee hence with hunt's-up to the day,
O, now be gone; more light and light it grows.

ROMEO

More light and light; more dark and dark our woes!

Enter Nurse, to the chamber

Nurse

Madam!

JULIET

Nurse?

Nurse

Your lady mother is coming to your chamber:
The day is broke; be wary, look about.

Exit

JULIET

Then, window, let day in, and let life out.

ROMEO

Farewell, farewell! one kiss, and I'll descend.

He goeth down

JULIET

Art thou gone so? love, lord, ay, husband, friend!
I must hear from thee every day in the hour,
For in a minute there are many days:
O, by this count I shall be much in years
Ere I again behold my Romeo!

ROMEO

Farewell!
I will omit no opportunity
That may convey my greetings, love, to thee.

JULIET

O think'st thou we shall ever meet again?

ROMEO

I doubt it not; and all these woes shall serve
For sweet discourses in our time to come.

JULIET

O God, I have an ill-divining soul!
Methinks I see thee, now thou art below,
As one dead in the bottom of a tomb:
Either my eyesight fails, or thou look'st pale.

ROMEO

And trust me, love, in my eye so do you:
Dry sorrow drinks our blood. Adieu, adieu!

Exit

JULIET

O fortune, fortune! all men call thee fickle:
If thou art fickle, what dost thou with him.
That is renown'd for faith? Be fickle, fortune;
For then, I hope, thou wilt not keep him long,
But send him back.

LADY CAPULET

[Within] Ho, daughter! are you up?

JULIET

Who is't that calls? is it my lady mother?
Is she not down so late, or up so early?
What unaccustom'd cause procures her hither?

Enter LADY CAPULET

LADY CAPULET

Why, how now, Juliet!

JULIET

Madam, I am not well.

LADY CAPULET

Evermore weeping for your cousin's death?
What, wilt thou wash him from his grave with tears?
An if thou couldst, thou couldst not make him live;
Therefore, have done: some grief shows much of love;
But much of grief shows still some want of wit.

JULIET

Yet let me weep for such a feeling loss.

LADY CAPULET

So shall you feel the loss, but not the friend
Which you weep for.

JULIET

Feeling so the loss,
Cannot choose but ever weep the friend.

LADY CAPULET

Well, girl, thou weep'st not so much for his death,
As that the villain lives which slaughter'd him.

JULIET

What villain madam?

LADY CAPULET

That same villain, Romeo.

JULIET

[Aside] Villain and he be many miles asunder.--
God Pardon him! I do, with all my heart;
And yet no man like he doth grieve my heart.

LADY CAPULET

That is, because the traitor murderer lives.

JULIET

Ay, madam, from the reach of these my hands:
Would none but I might venge my cousin's death!

LADY CAPULET

We will have vengeance for it, fear thou not:
Then weep no more. I'll send to one in Mantua,
Where that same banish'd runagate doth live,
Shall give him such an unaccustom'd dram,
That he shall soon keep Tybalt company:
And then, I hope, thou wilt be satisfied.

JULIET

Indeed, I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo, till I behold him--dead--
Is my poor heart for a kinsman vex'd.
Madam, if you could find out but a man
To bear a poison, I would temper it;
That Romeo should, upon receipt thereof,
Soon sleep in quiet. O, how my heart abhors
To hear him named, and cannot come to him.
To wreak the love I bore my cousin
Upon his body that slaughter'd him!

LADY CAPULET

Find thou the means, and I'll find such a man.
But now I'll tell thee joyful tidings, girl.

JULIET

And joy comes well in such a needy time:
What are they, I beseech your ladyship?

LADY CAPULET

Well, well, thou hast a careful father, child;
One who, to put thee from thy heaviness,
Hath sorted out a sudden day of joy,
That thou expect'st not nor I look'd not for.

JULIET

Madam, in happy time, what day is that?

LADY CAPULET

Marry, my child, early next Thursday morn,
The gallant, young and noble gentleman,
The County Paris, at Saint Peter's Church,
Shall happily make thee there a joyful bride.

JULIET

Now, by Saint Peter's Church and Peter too,
He shall not make me there a joyful bride.
I wonder at this haste; that I must wed
Ere he, that should be husband, comes to woo.
I pray you, tell my lord and father, madam,
I will not marry yet; and, when I do, I swear,
It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate,
Rather than Paris. These are news indeed!

LADY CAPULET

Here comes your father; tell him so yourself,
And see how he will take it at your hands.

Enter CAPULET and Nurse

CAPULET

When the sun sets, the air doth drizzle dew;
But for the sunset of my brother's son
It rains downright.
How now! a conduit, girl? what, still in tears?
Evermore showering? In one little body
Thou counterfeit'st a bark, a sea, a wind;
For still thy eyes, which I may call the sea,
Do ebb and flow with tears; the bark thy body is,
Sailing in this salt flood; the winds, thy sighs;
Who, raging with thy tears, and they with them,
Without a sudden calm, will overset
Thy tempest-tossed body. How now, wife!
Have you deliver'd to her our decree?

LADY CAPULET

Ay, sir; but she will none, she gives you thanks.
I would the fool were married to her grave!

CAPULET

Soft! take me with you, take me with you, wife.
How! will she none? doth she not give us thanks?
Is she not proud? doth she not count her blest,
Unworthy as she is, that we have wrought
So worthy a gentleman to be her bridegroom?

JULIET

Not proud, you have; but thankful, that you have:
Proud can I never be of what I hate;
But thankful even for hate, that is meant love.

CAPULET

How now, how now, chop-logic! What is this?
'Proud,' and 'I thank you,' and 'I thank you not;'
And yet 'not proud,' mistress minion, you,
Thank me no thankings, nor, proud me no prouds,
But fettle your fine joints 'gainst Thursday next,
To go with Paris to Saint Peter's Church,
Or I will drag thee on a hurdle thither.
Out, you green-sickness carrion! out, you baggage!
You tallow-face!

LADY CAPULET

Fie, fie! what, are you mad?

JULIET

Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

CAPULET

Hang thee, young baggage! disobedient wretch!
I tell thee what: get thee to church o' Thursday,
Or never after look me in the face:
Speak not, reply not, do not answer me;
My fingers itch. Wife, we scarce thought us blest
That God had lent us but this only child;
But now I see this one is one too much,
And that we have a curse in having her:
Out on her, hilding!

Nurse

God in heaven bless her!
You are to blame, my lord, to rate her so.

CAPULET

And why, my lady wisdom? hold your tongue,
Good prudence; smatter with your gossips, go.

Nurse

I speak no treason.

CAPULET

O, God ye god-den.

Nurse

May not one speak?

CAPULET

Peace, you mumbling fool!
Utter your gravity o'er a gossip's bowl;
For here we need it not.

LADY CAPULET

You are too hot.

CAPULET

God's bread! it makes me mad:
Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
Alone, in company, still my care hath been
To have her match'd: and having now provided
A gentleman of noble parentage,
Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly train'd,
Stuff'd, as they say, with honourable parts,
Proportion'd as one's thought would wish a man;
And then to have a wretched puling fool,
A whining mammet, in her fortune's tender,
To answer 'I'll not wed; I cannot love,
I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.'
But, as you will not wed, I'll pardon you:
Graze where you will you shall not house with me:
Look to't, think on't, I do not use to jest.
Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise:
An you be mine, I'll give you to my friend;
And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in
the streets,
For, by my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee,
Nor what is mine shall never do thee good:
Trust to't, bethink you; I'll not be forsworn.

Exit

JULIET

Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
O, sweet my mother, cast me not away!
Delay this marriage for a month, a week;
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.

LADY CAPULET

Talk not to me, for I'll not speak a word:
Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee.

Exit

JULIET

O God!--O nurse, how shall this be prevented?
My husband is on earth, my faith in heaven;
How shall that faith return again to earth,
Unless that husband send it me from heaven
By leaving earth? comfort me, counsel me.
Alack, alack, that heaven should practise stratagems
Upon so soft a subject as myself!
What say'st thou? hast thou not a word of joy?
Some comfort, nurse.

Nurse

Faith, here it is.
Romeo is banish'd; and all the world to nothing,
That he dares ne'er come back to challenge you;
Or, if he do, it needs must be by stealth.
Then, since the case so stands as now it doth,
I think it best you married with the county.
O, he's a lovely gentleman!
Romeo's a dishclout to him: an eagle, madam,
Hath not so green, so quick, so fair an eye
As Paris hath. Beshrew my very heart,
I think you are happy in this second match,
For it excels your first: or if it did not,
Your first is dead; or 'twere as good he were,
As living here and you no use of him.

JULIET

Speakest thou from thy heart?

Nurse

And from my soul too;
Or else beshrew them both.

JULIET

Amen!

Nurse

What?

JULIET

Well, thou hast comforted me marvellous much.
Go in: and tell my lady I am gone,
Having displeased my father, to Laurence' cell,
To make confession and to be absolved.

Nurse

Marry, I will; and this is wisely done.

Exit

JULIET

Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend!
Is it more sin to wish me thus forsworn,
Or to dispraise my lord with that same tongue
Which she hath praised him with above compare
So many thousand times? Go, counsellor;
Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain.
I'll to the friar, to know his remedy:
If all else fail, myself have power to die.

Exit

 

罗密欧及朱丽叶上。

朱丽叶你现在就要走了吗?天亮还有一会儿呢。那刺进你惊恐的耳膜中的,不是云雀,是夜莺的声音;它每天晚上在那边石榴树上歌唱。相信我,爱人,那是夜莺的歌声。

罗密欧那是报晓的云雀,不是夜莺。瞧,爱人,不作美的晨曦已经在东天的云朵上镶起了金线,夜晚的星光已经烧烬,愉快的白昼蹑足踏上了迷雾的山巅。我必须到别处去找寻生路,或者留在这儿束手等死。

朱丽叶那光明不是晨曦,我知道;那是从太阳中吐射出来的流星,要在今夜替你拿着火炬,照亮你到曼多亚去。所以你不必急着要去,再耽搁一会儿吧。

罗密欧让我被他们捉住,让我被他们处死;只要是你的意思,我就毫无怨恨。我愿意说那边灰白色的云彩不是黎明睁开它的睡眼,那不过是从月亮的眉宇间反映出来的微光;那响彻云霄的歌声,也不是出于云雀的喉中。我巴不得留在这里,永远不要离开。来吧,死,我欢迎你!因为这是朱丽叶的意思。怎么,我的灵魂?让我们谈谈;天还没有亮哩。

朱丽叶天已经亮了,天已经亮了;快走吧,快走吧!那唱得这样刺耳、嘶着粗涩的噪声和讨厌的锐音的,正是天际的云雀。有人说云雀会发出千变万化的甜蜜的歌声,这句话一点不对,因为它只使我们彼此分离;有人说云雀曾经和丑恶的蟾蜍交换眼睛,啊!我但愿它们也交换了声音,因为那声音使你离开了我的怀抱,用催醒的晨歌催促你登程。啊!现在你快走吧;天越来越亮了。

罗密欧天越来越亮,我们悲哀的心却越来越黑暗。

乳媪上。

乳媪小姐!

朱丽叶奶妈?

乳媪你的母亲就要到你房里来了。天已经亮啦,小心点儿。(下。)

朱丽叶那么窗啊,让白昼进来,让生命出去。

罗密欧再会,再会!给我一个吻,我就下去。(由窗口下降。)

朱丽叶你就这样走了吗?我的夫君,我的爱人,我的朋友!我必须在每一小时内的每一天听到你的消息,因为一分钟就等于许多天。啊!照这样计算起来,等我再看见我的罗密欧的时候,我不知道已经老到怎样了。

罗密欧再会!我决不放弃任何的机会,爱人,向你传达我的衷忱。

朱丽叶啊!你想我们会不会再有见面的日子?

罗密欧一定会有的;我们现在这一切悲哀痛苦,到将来便是握手谈心的资料。

朱丽叶上帝啊!我有一颗预感不祥的灵魂;你现在站在下面,我仿佛望见你像一具坟墓底下的尸骸。也许是我的眼光昏花,否则就是你的面容太惨白了。

罗密欧相信我,爱人,在我的眼中你也是这样;忧伤吸干了我们的血液。再会!再会!(下。)

朱丽叶命运啊命运!谁都说你反复无常;要是你真的反复无常,那么你怎样对待一个忠贞不贰的人呢?愿你不要改变你的轻浮的天性,因为这样也许你会早早打发他回来。

凯普莱特夫人(在内)喂,女儿!你起来了吗?

朱丽叶谁在叫我?是我的母亲吗?——难道她这么晚还没有睡觉,还是这么早就起来了?什么特殊的原因使她到这儿来?

凯普莱特夫人上。

凯普莱特夫人啊!怎么,朱丽叶!

朱丽叶母亲,我不大舒服。

凯普莱特夫人老是为了你表兄的死而掉泪吗?什么!你想用眼泪把他从坟墓里冲出来吗?就是冲得出来,你也没法子叫他复活;所以还是算了吧。适当的悲哀可以表示感情的深切,过度的伤心却可以证明智慧的欠缺。

朱丽叶可是让我为了这样一个痛心的损失而流泪吧。

凯普莱特夫人损失固然痛心,可是一个失去的亲人,不是眼泪哭得回来的。

朱丽叶因为这损失实在太痛心了,我不能不为了失去的亲人而痛哭。

凯普莱特夫人好,孩子,人已经死了,你也不用多哭他了;顶可恨的是那杀死他的恶人仍旧活在世上。

朱丽叶什么恶人,母亲?

凯普莱特夫人就是罗密欧那个恶人。

朱丽叶(旁白)恶人跟他相去真有十万八千里呢。——上帝饶恕他!我愿意全心饶恕他;可是没有一个人像他那样使我心里充满了悲伤。

凯普莱特夫人那是因为这个万恶的凶手还活在世上。

朱丽叶是的,母亲,我恨不得把他抓住在我的手里。但愿我能够独自报复这一段杀兄之仇!

凯普莱特夫人我们一定要报仇的,你放心吧;别再哭了。这个亡命的流徒现在到曼多亚去了,我要差一个人到那边去,用一种希有的毒药把他毒死,让他早点儿跟提伯尔特见面;那时候我想你一定可以满足了。

朱丽叶真的,我心里永远不会感到满足,除非我看见罗密欧在我的面前——死去;我这颗可怜的心是这样为了一个亲人而痛楚!母亲,要是您能够找到一个愿意带毒药去的人,让我亲手把它调好,好叫那罗密欧服下以后,就会安然睡去。唉!我心里多么难过,只听到他的名字,却不能赶到他的面前,为了我对哥哥的感情,我巴不得能在那杀死他的人的身上报这个仇!

凯普莱特夫人你去想办法,我一定可以找到这样一个人。可是,孩子,现在我要告诉你好消息。

朱丽叶在这样不愉快的时候,好消息来得真是再适当没有了。请问母亲,是什么好消息呢?

凯普莱特夫人哈哈,孩子,你有一个体贴你的好爸爸哩;他为了替你排解愁闷已经为你选定了一个大喜的日子,不但你想不到,就是我也没有想到。

朱丽叶母亲,快告诉我,是什么日子?

凯普莱特夫人哈哈,我的孩子,星期四的早晨,那位风流年少的贵人,帕里斯伯爵,就要在圣彼得教堂里娶你做他的幸福的新娘了。

朱丽叶凭着圣彼得教堂和圣彼得的名字起誓,我决不让他娶我做他的幸福的新娘。世间哪有这样匆促的事情,人家还没有来向我求过婚,我倒先做了他的妻子了!母亲,请您对我的父亲说,我现在还不愿意出嫁;就是要出嫁,我可以发誓,我也宁愿嫁给我所痛恨的罗密欧,不愿嫁给帕里斯。真是些好消息!

凯普莱特夫人你爸爸来啦;你自己对他说去,看他会不会听你的话。

凯普莱特及乳媪上。

凯普莱特太阳西下的时候,天空中落下了蒙蒙的细露;可是我的侄儿死了,却有倾盆的大雨送着他下葬。怎么!装起喷水管来了吗,孩子?咦!还在哭吗?雨到现在还没有停吗?你这小小的身体里面,也有船,也有海,也有风;因为你的眼睛就是海,永远有泪潮在那儿涨退;你的身体是一艘船,在这泪海上面航行;你的叹息是海上的狂风;你的身体经不起风浪的吹打,会在这汹涌的怒海中覆没的。怎么,妻子!你没有把我们的主意告诉她吗?

凯普莱特夫人我告诉她了!可是她说谢谢你,她不要嫁人。我希望这傻丫头还是死了干净!

凯普莱特且慢!讲明白点儿,讲明白点儿,妻子。怎么!她不要嫁人吗?她不谢谢我们吗?她不称心吗?像她这样一个贱丫头,我们替她找到了这么一位高贵的绅士做她的新郎,她还不想想这是多大的福气吗?

朱丽叶我没有喜欢,只有感激;你们不能勉强我喜欢一个我对他没有好感的人,可是我感激你们爱我的一片好心。

凯普莱特怎么!怎么!胡说八道!这是什么话?什么“喜欢”“不喜欢”,“感激”“不感激”!好丫头,我也不要你感谢,我也不要你喜欢,只要你预备好星期四到圣彼得教堂里去跟帕里斯结婚;你要是不愿意,我就把你装在木笼里拖了去。不要脸的死丫头,贱东西!

凯普莱特夫人嗳哟!嗳哟!你疯了吗?

朱丽叶好爸爸,我跪下来求求您,请您耐心听我说一句话。

凯普莱特该死的小贱妇!不孝的畜生!我告诉你,星期四给我到教堂里去,不然以后再也不要见我的面。不许说话,不要回答我;我的手指痒着呢。——夫人,我们常常怨叹自己福薄,只生下这一个孩子;可是现在我才知道就是这一个已经太多了,总是家门不幸,出了这一个冤孽!不要脸的贱货!

乳媪上帝祝福她!老爷,您不该这样骂她。

凯普莱特为什么不该!我的聪明的老太太?谁要你多嘴,我的好大娘?你去跟你那些婆婆妈妈们谈天去吧,去!

乳媪我又没有说过一句冒犯您的话。

凯普莱特啊,去你的吧。

乳媪人家就不能开口吗?

凯普莱特闭嘴,你这叽哩咕噜的蠢婆娘!我们不要听你的教训。

凯普莱特夫人你的脾气太躁了。

凯普莱特哼!我气都气疯啦。每天每夜,时时刻刻,不论忙着空着,独自一个人或是跟别人在一起,我心里总是在盘算着怎样把她许配给一份好好的人家;现在好容易找到一位出身高贵的绅士,又有家私,又年轻,又受过高尚的教养,正是人家说的十二分的人才,好到没得说的了;偏偏这个不懂事的傻丫头,放着送上门来的好福气不要,说什么“我不要结婚”、“我不懂恋爱”、“我年纪太小”、“请你原谅我”;好,你要是不愿意嫁人,我可以放你自由,尽你的意思到什么地方去,我这屋子里可容不得你了。你给我想想明白,我是一向说到哪里做到哪里的。星期四就在眼前;自己仔细考虑考虑。你倘然是我的女儿,就得听我的话嫁给我的朋友;你倘然不是我的女儿,那么你去上吊也好,做叫化子也好,挨饿也好,死在街道上也好,我都不管,因为凭着我的灵魂起誓,我是再也不会认你这个女儿的,你也别想我会分一点什么给你。我不会骗你,你想一想吧;我已经发过誓了,我一定要把它做到。(下。)

朱丽叶天知道我心里是多么难过,难道它竟会不给我一点慈悲吗?啊,我的亲爱的母亲!不要丢弃我!把这门亲事延期一个月或是一个星期也好;或者要是您不答应我,那么请您把我的新床安放在提伯尔特长眠的幽暗的坟茔里吧!

凯普莱特夫人不要对我讲话,我没有什么话好说的。随你的便吧,我是不管你啦。(下。)

朱丽叶上帝啊!啊,奶妈!这件事情怎么避过去呢?我的丈夫还在世间,我的誓言已经上达天听;倘使我的誓言可以收回,那么除非我的丈夫已经脱离人世,从天上把它送还给我。安慰安慰我,替我想想办法吧。唉!想不到天也会捉弄像我这样一个柔弱的人!你怎么说?难道你没有一句可以使我快乐的话吗?奶妈,给我一点安慰吧!

乳媪好,那么你听我说。罗密欧是已经放逐了;我可以拿随便什么东西跟你打赌,他再也不敢回来责问你,除非他偷偷地溜了回来。事情既然这样,那么我想你最好还是跟那伯爵结婚吧。啊!他真是个可爱的绅士!罗密欧比起他来只好算是一块抹布;小姐,一只鹰也没有像帕里斯那样一双又是碧绿好看、又是锐利的眼睛。说句该死的话,我想你这第二个丈夫,比第一个丈夫好得多啦;纵然不是好得多,可是你的第一个丈夫虽然还在世上,对你已经没有什么用处,也就跟死了差不多啦。

朱丽叶你些话是从心里说出来的吗?

乳媪那不但是我心里的话,也是我灵魂里的话;倘有虚假,让我的灵魂下地狱。

朱丽叶阿门!

乳媪什么!

朱丽叶好,你已经给了我很大的安慰。你进去吧;告诉我的母亲说我出去了,因为得罪了我的父亲,要到劳伦斯的寺院里去忏悔我的罪过。

乳媪很好,我就这样告诉她;这才是聪明的办法哩。(下。)

朱丽叶老而不死的魔鬼!顶丑恶的妖精!她希望我背弃我的盟誓;她几千次向我夸奖我的丈夫,说他比谁都好,现在却又用同一条舌头说他的坏话!去,我的顾问;从此以后,我再也不把你当作心腹看待了。我要到神父那儿去向他求救;要是一切办法都已用尽,我还有死这条路。(下。)