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SCENE II. Capulet's orchard.

Enter ROMEO

ROMEO

He jests at scars that never felt a wound.

JULIET appears above at a window

But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Who is already sick and pale with grief,
That thou her maid art far more fair than she:
Be not her maid, since she is envious;
Her vestal livery is but sick and green
And none but fools do wear it; cast it off.
It is my lady, O, it is my love!
O, that she knew she were!
She speaks yet she says nothing: what of that?
Her eye discourses; I will answer it.
I am too bold, 'tis not to me she speaks:
Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven,
Having some business, do entreat her eyes
To twinkle in their spheres till they return.
What if her eyes were there, they in her head?
The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars,
As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven
Would through the airy region stream so bright
That birds would sing and think it were not night.
See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand!
O, that I were a glove upon that hand,
That I might touch that cheek!

JULIET

Ay me!

ROMEO

She speaks:
O, speak again, bright angel! for thou art
As glorious to this night, being o'er my head
As is a winged messenger of heaven
Unto the white-upturned wondering eyes
Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him
When he bestrides the lazy-pacing clouds
And sails upon the bosom of the air.

JULIET

O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.

ROMEO

[Aside] Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

JULIET

'Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What's Montague? it is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What's in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for that name which is no part of thee
Take all myself.

ROMEO

I take thee at thy word:
Call me but love, and I'll be new baptized;
Henceforth I never will be Romeo.

JULIET

What man art thou that thus bescreen'd in night
So stumblest on my counsel?

ROMEO

By a name
I know not how to tell thee who I am:
My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself,
Because it is an enemy to thee;
Had I it written, I would tear the word.

JULIET

My ears have not yet drunk a hundred words
Of that tongue's utterance, yet I know the sound:
Art thou not Romeo and a Montague?

ROMEO

Neither, fair saint, if either thee dislike.

JULIET

How camest thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

ROMEO

With love's light wings did I o'er-perch these walls;
For stony limits cannot hold love out,
And what love can do that dares love attempt;
Therefore thy kinsmen are no let to me.

JULIET

If they do see thee, they will murder thee.

ROMEO

Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of their swords: look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against their enmity.

JULIET

I would not for the world they saw thee here.

ROMEO

I have night's cloak to hide me from their sight;
And but thou love me, let them find me here:
My life were better ended by their hate,
Than death prorogued, wanting of thy love.

JULIET

By whose direction found'st thou out this place?

ROMEO

By love, who first did prompt me to inquire;
He lent me counsel and I lent him eyes.
I am no pilot; yet, wert thou as far
As that vast shore wash'd with the farthest sea,
I would adventure for such merchandise.

JULIET

Thou know'st the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
For that which thou hast heard me speak to-night
Fain would I dwell on form, fain, fain deny
What I have spoke: but farewell compliment!
Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say 'Ay,'
And I will take thy word: yet if thou swear'st,
Thou mayst prove false; at lovers' perjuries
Then say, Jove laughs. O gentle Romeo,
If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully:
Or if thou think'st I am too quickly won,
I'll frown and be perverse an say thee nay,
So thou wilt woo; but else, not for the world.
In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond,
And therefore thou mayst think my 'havior light:
But trust me, gentleman, I'll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.
I should have been more strange, I must confess,
But that thou overheard'st, ere I was ware,
My true love's passion: therefore pardon me,
And not impute this yielding to light love,
Which the dark night hath so discovered.

ROMEO

Lady, by yonder blessed moon I swear
That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops--

JULIET

O, swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.

ROMEO

What shall I swear by?

JULIET

Do not swear at all;
Or, if thou wilt, swear by thy gracious self,
Which is the god of my idolatry,
And I'll believe thee.

ROMEO

If my heart's dear love--

JULIET

Well, do not swear: although I joy in thee,
I have no joy of this contract to-night:
It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden;
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say 'It lightens.' Sweet, good night!
This bud of love, by summer's ripening breath,
May prove a beauteous flower when next we meet.
Good night, good night! as sweet repose and rest
Come to thy heart as that within my breast!

ROMEO

O, wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied?

JULIET

What satisfaction canst thou have to-night?

ROMEO

The exchange of thy love's faithful vow for mine.

JULIET

I gave thee mine before thou didst request it:
And yet I would it were to give again.

ROMEO

Wouldst thou withdraw it? for what purpose, love?

JULIET

But to be frank, and give it thee again.
And yet I wish but for the thing I have:
My bounty is as boundless as the sea,
My love as deep; the more I give to thee,
The more I have, for both are infinite.

Nurse calls within

I hear some noise within; dear love, adieu!
Anon, good nurse! Sweet Montague, be true.
Stay but a little, I will come again.

Exit, above

ROMEO

O blessed, blessed night! I am afeard.
Being in night, all this is but a dream,
Too flattering-sweet to be substantial.

Re-enter JULIET, above

JULIET

Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed.
If that thy bent of love be honourable,
Thy purpose marriage, send me word to-morrow,
By one that I'll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite;
And all my fortunes at thy foot I'll lay
And follow thee my lord throughout the world.

Nurse

[Within] Madam!

JULIET

I come, anon.--But if thou mean'st not well,
I do beseech thee--

Nurse

[Within] Madam!

JULIET

By and by, I come:--
To cease thy suit, and leave me to my grief:
To-morrow will I send.

ROMEO

So thrive my soul--

JULIET

A thousand times good night!

Exit, above

ROMEO

A thousand times the worse, to want thy light.
Love goes toward love, as schoolboys from
their books,
But love from love, toward school with heavy looks.

Retiring

Re-enter JULIET, above

JULIET

Hist! Romeo, hist! O, for a falconer's voice,
To lure this tassel-gentle back again!
Bondage is hoarse, and may not speak aloud;
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine,
With repetition of my Romeo's name.

ROMEO

It is my soul that calls upon my name:
How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues by night,
Like softest music to attending ears!

JULIET

Romeo!

ROMEO

My dear?

JULIET

At what o'clock to-morrow
Shall I send to thee?

ROMEO

At the hour of nine.

JULIET

I will not fail: 'tis twenty years till then.
I have forgot why I did call thee back.

ROMEO

Let me stand here till thou remember it.

JULIET

I shall forget, to have thee still stand there,
Remembering how I love thy company.

ROMEO

And I'll still stay, to have thee still forget,
Forgetting any other home but this.

JULIET

'Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone:
And yet no further than a wanton's bird;
Who lets it hop a little from her hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.

ROMEO

I would I were thy bird.

JULIET

Sweet, so would I:
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.
Good night, good night! parting is such
sweet sorrow,
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

Exit above

ROMEO

Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast!
Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest!
Hence will I to my ghostly father's cell,
His help to crave, and my dear hap to tell.

Exit

罗密欧上。

罗密欧没有受过伤的才会讥笑别人身上的创痕。(朱丽叶自上方窗户中出现)轻声!那边窗子里亮起来的是什么光?那就是东方,朱丽叶就是太阳!起来吧,美丽的太阳!赶走那妒忌的月亮,她因为她的女弟子比她美得多,已经气得面色惨白了。既然她这样妒忌着你,你不要忠于她吧;脱下她给你的这一身惨绿色的贞女的道服,它是只配给愚人穿的。那是我的意中人;啊!那是我的爱;唉,但愿她知道我在爱着她!她欲言又止,可是她的眼睛已经道出了她的心事。待我去回答她吧;不,我不要太卤莽,她不是对我说话。天上两颗最灿烂的星,因为有事他去,请求她的眼睛替代它们在空中闪耀。要是她的眼睛变成了天上的星,天上的星变成了她的眼睛,那便怎样呢?她脸上的光辉会掩盖了星星的明亮,正像灯光在朝阳下黯然失色一样;在天上的她的眼睛,会在太空中大放光明,使鸟儿误认为黑夜已经过去而唱出它们的歌声。瞧!她用纤手托住了脸,那姿态是多么美妙!啊,但愿我是那一只手上的手套,好让我亲一亲她脸上的香泽!

朱丽叶唉!

罗密欧她说话了。啊!再说下去吧,光明的天使!因为我在这夜色之中仰视着你,就像一个尘世的凡人,张大了出神的眼睛,瞻望着一个生着翅膀的天使,驾着白云缓缓地驰过了天空一样。

朱丽叶罗密欧啊,罗密欧!为什么你偏偏是罗密欧呢?否认你的父亲,抛弃你的姓名吧;也许你不愿意这样做,那么只要你宣誓做我的爱人,我也不愿再姓凯普莱特了。

罗密欧(旁白)我还是继续听下去呢,还是现在就对她说话?

朱丽叶只有你的名字才是我的仇敌;你即使不姓蒙太古,仍然是这样的一个你。姓不姓蒙太古又有什么关系呢?它又不是手,又不是脚,又不是手臂,又不是脸,又不是身体上任何其他的部分。啊!换一个姓名吧!姓名本来是没有意义的;我们叫做玫瑰的这一种花,要是换了个名字,它的香味还是同样的芬芳;罗密欧要是换了别的名字,他的可爱的完美也决不会有丝毫改变。罗密欧,抛弃了你的名字吧;我愿意把我整个的心灵,赔偿你这一个身外的空名。

罗密欧那么我就听你的话,你只要叫我做爱,我就重新受洗,重新命名;从今以后,永远不再叫罗密欧了。

朱丽叶你是什么人,在黑夜里躲躲闪闪地偷听人家的话?

罗密欧我没法告诉你我叫什么名字。敬爱的神明,我痛恨我自己的名字,因为它是你的仇敌;要是把它写在纸上,我一定把这几个字撕成粉碎。

朱丽叶我的耳朵里还没有灌进从你嘴里吐出来的一百个字,可是我认识你的声音;你不是罗密欧,蒙太古家里的人吗?

罗密欧不是,美人,要是你不喜欢这两个名字。

朱丽叶告诉我,你怎么会到这儿来,为什么到这儿来?花园的墙这么高,是不容易爬上来的;要是我家里的人瞧见你在这儿,他们一定不让你活命。

罗密欧我借着爱的轻翼飞过园墙,因为砖石的墙垣是不能把爱情阻隔的;爱情的力量所能够做到的事,它都会冒险尝试,所以我不怕你家里人的干涉。

朱丽叶要是他们瞧见了你,一定会把你杀死的。

罗密欧唉!你的眼睛比他们二十柄刀剑还厉害;只要你用温柔的眼光看着我,他们就不能伤害我的身体。

朱丽叶我怎么也不愿让他们瞧见你在这儿。

罗密欧朦胧的夜色可以替我遮过他们的眼睛。只要你爱我,就让他们瞧见我吧;与其因为得不到你的爱情而在这世上捱命,还不如在仇人的刀剑下丧生。

朱丽叶谁叫你找到这儿来的?

罗密欧爱情怂恿我探听出这一个地方;他替我出主意,我借给他眼睛。我不会操舟驾舵,可是倘使你在辽远辽远的海滨,我也会冒着风波寻访你这颗珍宝。

朱丽叶幸亏黑夜替我罩上了一重面幕,否则为了我刚才被你听去的话,你一定可以看见我脸上羞愧的红晕。我真想遵守礼法,否认已经说过的言语,可是这些虚文俗礼,现在只好一切置之不顾了!你爱我吗?我知道你一定会说“是的”;我也一定会相信你的话;可是也许你起的誓只是一个谎,人家说,对于恋人们的寒盟背信,天神是一笑置之的。温柔的罗密欧啊!你要是真的爱我,就请你诚意告诉我;你要是嫌我太容易降心相从,我也会堆起怒容,装出倔强的神气,拒绝你的好意,好让你向我婉转求情,否则我是无论如何不会拒绝你的。俊秀的蒙太古啊,我真的太痴心了,所以也许你会觉得我的举动有点轻浮;可是相信我,朋友,总有一天你会知道我的忠心远胜过那些善于矜持作态的人。我必须承认,倘不是你乘我不备的时候偷听去了我的真情的表白,我一定会更加矜持一点的;所以原谅我吧,是黑夜泄漏了我心底的秘密,不要把我的允诺看作无耻的轻狂。

罗密欧姑娘,凭着这一轮皎洁的月亮,它的银光涂染着这些果树的梢端,我发誓——

朱丽叶啊!不要指着月亮起誓,它是变化无常的,每个月都有盈亏圆缺;你要是指着它起誓,也许你的爱情也会像它一样无常。

罗密欧那么我指着什么起誓呢?

朱丽叶不用起誓吧;或者要是你愿意的话,就凭着你优美的自身起誓,那是我所崇拜的偶像,我一定会相信你的。

罗密欧要是我的出自深心的爱情——

朱丽叶好,别起誓啦。我虽然喜欢你,却不喜欢今天晚上的密约;它太仓卒、太轻率、太出人意外了,正像一闪电光,等不及人家开一声口,已经消隐了下去。好人,再会吧!这一朵爱的蓓蕾,靠着夏天的暖风的吹拂,也许会在我们下次相见的时候,开出鲜艳的花来。晚安,晚安!但愿恬静的安息同样降临到你我两人的心头!

罗密欧啊!你就这样离我而去,不给我一点满足吗?

朱丽叶你今夜还要什么满足呢?

罗密欧你还没有把你的爱情的忠实的盟誓跟我交换。

朱丽叶在你没有要求以前,我已经把我的爱给了你了;可是我倒愿意重新给你。

罗密欧你要把它收回去吗?为什么呢,爱人?

朱丽叶为了表示我的慷慨,我要把它重新给你。可是我只愿意要我已有的东西:我的慷慨像海一样浩渺,我的爱情也像海一样深沉;我给你的越多,我自己也越是富有,因为这两者都是没有穷尽的。(乳媪在内呼唤)我听见里面有人在叫;亲爱的,再会吧!——就来了,好奶妈!——亲爱的蒙太古,愿你不要负心。再等一会儿,我就会来的。(自上方下。)

罗密欧幸福的,幸福的夜啊!我怕我只是在晚上做了一个梦,这样美满的事不会是真实的。

朱丽叶自上方重上。

朱丽叶亲爱的罗密欧,再说三句话,我们真的要再会了。要是你的爱情的确是光明正大,你的目的是在于婚姻,那么明天我会叫一个人到你的地方来,请你叫他带一个信给我,告诉我你愿意在什么地方、什么时候举行婚礼;我就会把我的整个命运交托给你,把你当作我的主人,跟随你到天涯海角。

乳媪(在内)小姐!

朱丽叶就来。——可是你要是没有诚意,那么我请求你——

乳媪(在内)小姐!

朱丽叶等一等,我来了。——停止你的求爱,让我一个人独自伤心吧。明天我就叫人来看你。

罗密欧凭着我的灵魂——

朱丽叶一千次的晚安!(自上方下。)

罗密欧晚上没有你的光,我只有一千次的心伤!恋爱的人去赴他情人的约会,像一个放学归来的儿童;可是当他和情人分别的时候,却像上学去一般满脸懊丧。(退后。)

朱丽叶自上方重上。

朱丽叶嘘!罗密欧!嘘!唉!我希望我会发出呼鹰的声音,招这只鹰儿回来。我不能高声说话,否则我要让我的喊声传进厄科①(厄科(Echo),是希腊神话中的仙女,因恋爱美少年那耳喀索斯不遂而形消体灭,化为山谷中的回声。 )的洞穴,让她的无形的喉咙因为反复叫喊着我的罗密欧的名字而变成嘶哑。

罗密欧那是我的灵魂在叫喊着我的名字。恋人的声音在晚间多么清婉,听上去就像最柔和的音乐!

朱丽叶罗密欧!

罗密欧我的爱!

朱丽叶明天我应该在什么时候叫人来看你?

罗密欧就在九点钟吧。

朱丽叶我一定不失信;挨到那个时候,该有二十年那么长久!我记不起为什么要叫你回来了。

罗密欧让我站在这儿,等你记起了告诉我。

朱丽叶你这样站在我的面前,我一心想着多么爱跟你在一块儿,一定永远记不起来了。

罗密欧那么我就永远等在这儿,让你永远记不起来,忘记除了这里以外还有什么家。

朱丽叶天快要亮了;我希望你快去;可是我就好比一个淘气的女孩子,像放松一个囚犯似的让她心爱的鸟儿暂时跳出她的掌心,又用一根丝线把它拉了回来,爱的私心使她不愿意给它自由。

罗密欧我但愿我是你的鸟儿。

朱丽叶好人,我也但愿这样;可是我怕你会死在我的过分的爱抚里。晚安!晚安!离别是这样甜蜜的凄清,我真要向你道晚安直到天明!(下。)

罗密欧但愿睡眠合上你的眼睛!

但愿平静安息我的心灵!

我如今要去向神父求教,

把今宵的艳遇诉他知晓。(下。)