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SCENE I. Verona. A public place.

Enter SAMPSON and GREGORY, of the house of Capulet, armed with swords and bucklers

SAMPSON

Gregory, o' my word, we'll not carry coals.

GREGORY

No, for then we should be colliers.

SAMPSON

I mean, an we be in choler, we'll draw.

GREGORY

Ay, while you live, draw your neck out o' the collar.

SAMPSON

I strike quickly, being moved.

GREGORY

But thou art not quickly moved to strike.

SAMPSON

A dog of the house of Montague moves me.

GREGORY

To move is to stir; and to be valiant is to stand:
therefore, if thou art moved, thou runn'st away.

SAMPSON

A dog of that house shall move me to stand: I will
take the wall of any man or maid of Montague's.

GREGORY

That shows thee a weak slave; for the weakest goes
to the wall.

SAMPSON

True; and therefore women, being the weaker vessels,
are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push
Montague's men from the wall, and thrust his maids
to the wall.

GREGORY

The quarrel is between our masters and us their men.

SAMPSON

'Tis all one, I will show myself a tyrant: when I
have fought with the men, I will be cruel with the
maids, and cut off their heads.

GREGORY

The heads of the maids?

SAMPSON

Ay, the heads of the maids, or their maidenheads;
take it in what sense thou wilt.

GREGORY

They must take it in sense that feel it.

SAMPSON

Me they shall feel while I am able to stand: and
'tis known I am a pretty piece of flesh.

GREGORY

'Tis well thou art not fish; if thou hadst, thou
hadst been poor John. Draw thy tool! here comes
two of the house of the Montagues.

SAMPSON

My naked weapon is out: quarrel, I will back thee.

GREGORY

How! turn thy back and run?

SAMPSON

Fear me not.

GREGORY

No, marry; I fear thee!

SAMPSON

Let us take the law of our sides; let them begin.

GREGORY

I will frown as I pass by, and let them take it as
they list.

SAMPSON

Nay, as they dare. I will bite my thumb at them;
which is a disgrace to them, if they bear it.

Enter ABRAHAM and BALTHASAR

ABRAHAM

Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

SAMPSON

I do bite my thumb, sir.

ABRAHAM

Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

SAMPSON

[Aside to GREGORY] Is the law of our side, if I say
ay?

GREGORY

No.

SAMPSON

No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you, sir, but I
bite my thumb, sir.

GREGORY

Do you quarrel, sir?

ABRAHAM

Quarrel sir! no, sir.

SAMPSON

If you do, sir, I am for you: I serve as good a man as you.

ABRAHAM

No better.

SAMPSON

Well, sir.

GREGORY

Say 'better:' here comes one of my master's kinsmen.

SAMPSON

Yes, better, sir.

ABRAHAM

You lie.

SAMPSON

Draw, if you be men. Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.

They fight

Enter BENVOLIO

BENVOLIO

Part, fools!
Put up your swords; you know not what you do.

Beats down their swords

Enter TYBALT

TYBALT

What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds?
Turn thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death.

BENVOLIO

I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword,
Or manage it to part these men with me.

TYBALT

What, drawn, and talk of peace! I hate the word,
As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee:
Have at thee, coward!

They fight

Enter, several of both houses, who join the fray; then enter Citizens, with clubs

First Citizen

Clubs, bills, and partisans! strike! beat them down!
Down with the Capulets! down with the Montagues!

Enter CAPULET in his gown, and LADY CAPULET

CAPULET

What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!

LADY CAPULET

A crutch, a crutch! why call you for a sword?

CAPULET

My sword, I say! Old Montague is come,
And flourishes his blade in spite of me.

Enter MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE

MONTAGUE

Thou villain Capulet,--Hold me not, let me go.

LADY MONTAGUE

Thou shalt not stir a foot to seek a foe.

Enter PRINCE, with Attendants

PRINCE

Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace,
Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel,--
Will they not hear? What, ho! you men, you beasts,
That quench the fire of your pernicious rage
With purple fountains issuing from your veins,
On pain of torture, from those bloody hands
Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground,
And hear the sentence of your moved prince.
Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word,
By thee, old Capulet, and Montague,
Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets,
And made Verona's ancient citizens
Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments,
To wield old partisans, in hands as old,
Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate:
If ever you disturb our streets again,
Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.
For this time, all the rest depart away:
You Capulet; shall go along with me:
And, Montague, come you this afternoon,
To know our further pleasure in this case,
To old Free-town, our common judgment-place.
Once more, on pain of death, all men depart.

Exeunt all but MONTAGUE, LADY MONTAGUE, and BENVOLIO

MONTAGUE

Who set this ancient quarrel new abroach?
Speak, nephew, were you by when it began?

BENVOLIO

Here were the servants of your adversary,
And yours, close fighting ere I did approach:
I drew to part them: in the instant came
The fiery Tybalt, with his sword prepared,
Which, as he breathed defiance to my ears,
He swung about his head and cut the winds,
Who nothing hurt withal hiss'd him in scorn:
While we were interchanging thrusts and blows,
Came more and more and fought on part and part,
Till the prince came, who parted either part.

LADY MONTAGUE

O, where is Romeo? saw you him to-day?
Right glad I am he was not at this fray.

BENVOLIO

Madam, an hour before the worshipp'd sun
Peer'd forth the golden window of the east,
A troubled mind drave me to walk abroad;
Where, underneath the grove of sycamore
That westward rooteth from the city's side,
So early walking did I see your son:
Towards him I made, but he was ware of me
And stole into the covert of the wood:
I, measuring his affections by my own,
That most are busied when they're most alone,
Pursued my humour not pursuing his,
And gladly shunn'd who gladly fled from me.

MONTAGUE

Many a morning hath he there been seen,
With tears augmenting the fresh morning dew.
Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs;
But all so soon as the all-cheering sun
Should in the furthest east begin to draw
The shady curtains from Aurora's bed,
Away from the light steals home my heavy son,
And private in his chamber pens himself,
Shuts up his windows, locks far daylight out
And makes himself an artificial night:
Black and portentous must this humour prove,
Unless good counsel may the cause remove.

BENVOLIO

My noble uncle, do you know the cause?

MONTAGUE

I neither know it nor can learn of him.

BENVOLIO

Have you importuned him by any means?

MONTAGUE

Both by myself and many other friends:
But he, his own affections' counsellor,
Is to himself--I will not say how true--
But to himself so secret and so close,
So far from sounding and discovery,
As is the bud bit with an envious worm,
Ere he can spread his sweet leaves to the air,
Or dedicate his beauty to the sun.
Could we but learn from whence his sorrows grow.
We would as willingly give cure as know.

Enter ROMEO

BENVOLIO

See, where he comes: so please you, step aside;
I'll know his grievance, or be much denied.

MONTAGUE

I would thou wert so happy by thy stay,
To hear true shrift. Come, madam, let's away.

Exeunt MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE

BENVOLIO

Good-morrow, cousin.

ROMEO

Is the day so young?

BENVOLIO

But new struck nine.

ROMEO

Ay me! sad hours seem long.
Was that my father that went hence so fast?

BENVOLIO

It was. What sadness lengthens Romeo's hours?

ROMEO

Not having that, which, having, makes them short.

BENVOLIO

In love?

ROMEO

Out--

BENVOLIO

Of love?

ROMEO

Out of her favour, where I am in love.

BENVOLIO

Alas, that love, so gentle in his view,
Should be so tyrannous and rough in proof!

ROMEO

Alas, that love, whose view is muffled still,
Should, without eyes, see pathways to his will!
Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here?
Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all.
Here's much to do with hate, but more with love.
Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!
O any thing, of nothing first create!
O heavy lightness! serious vanity!
Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!
Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire,
sick health!
Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!
This love feel I, that feel no love in this.
Dost thou not laugh?

BENVOLIO

No, coz, I rather weep.

ROMEO

Good heart, at what?

BENVOLIO

At thy good heart's oppression.

ROMEO

Why, such is love's transgression.
Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast,
Which thou wilt propagate, to have it prest
With more of thine: this love that thou hast shown
Doth add more grief to too much of mine own.
Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs;
Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes;
Being vex'd a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears:
What is it else? a madness most discreet,
A choking gall and a preserving sweet.
Farewell, my coz.

BENVOLIO

Soft! I will go along;
An if you leave me so, you do me wrong.

ROMEO

Tut, I have lost myself; I am not here;
This is not Romeo, he's some other where.

BENVOLIO

Tell me in sadness, who is that you love.

ROMEO

What, shall I groan and tell thee?

BENVOLIO

Groan! why, no.
But sadly tell me who.

ROMEO

Bid a sick man in sadness make his will:
Ah, word ill urged to one that is so ill!
In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.

BENVOLIO

I aim'd so near, when I supposed you loved.

ROMEO

A right good mark-man! And she's fair I love.

BENVOLIO

A right fair mark, fair coz, is soonest hit.

ROMEO

Well, in that hit you miss: she'll not be hit
With Cupid's arrow; she hath Dian's wit;
And, in strong proof of chastity well arm'd,
From love's weak childish bow she lives unharm'd.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms,
Nor bide the encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O, she is rich in beauty, only poor,
That when she dies with beauty dies her store.

BENVOLIO

Then she hath sworn that she will still live chaste?

ROMEO

She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste,
For beauty starved with her severity
Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
She is too fair, too wise, wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair:
She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow
Do I live dead that live to tell it now.

BENVOLIO

Be ruled by me, forget to think of her.

ROMEO

O, teach me how I should forget to think.

BENVOLIO

By giving liberty unto thine eyes;
Examine other beauties.

ROMEO

'Tis the way
To call hers exquisite, in question more:
These happy masks that kiss fair ladies' brows
Being black put us in mind they hide the fair;
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost:
Show me a mistress that is passing fair,
What doth her beauty serve, but as a note
Where I may read who pass'd that passing fair?
Farewell: thou canst not teach me to forget.

BENVOLIO

I'll pay that doctrine, or else die in debt.

Exeunt

山普孙及葛莱古里各持盾剑上。

山普孙葛莱古里,咱们可真的不能让人家当做苦力一样欺侮。

葛莱古里对了,咱们不是可以随便给人欺侮的。

山普孙我说,咱们要是发起脾气来,就会拔剑动武。

葛莱古里对了,你可不要把脖子缩到领口里去。

山普孙我一动性子,我的剑是不认人的。

葛莱古里可是你不大容易动性子。

山普孙我见了蒙太古家的狗子就生气。

葛莱古里有胆量的,生了气就应当站住不动;逃跑的不是好汉。

山普孙我见了他们家里的狗子,就会站住不动;蒙太古家里任何男女碰到了我,就像是碰到墙壁一样。

葛莱古里这正说明你是个软弱无能的奴才;只有最没出息的家伙,才去墙底下躲难。

山普孙的确不错;所以生来软弱的女人,就老是被人逼得不能动:我见了蒙太古家里人来,是男人我就把他们从墙边推出去,是女人我就把她们望着墙壁摔过去。

葛莱古里吵架是咱们两家主仆男人们的事,与她们女人有什么相干?

山普孙那我不管,我要做一个杀人不眨眼的魔王;一面跟男人们打架,一面对娘儿们也不留情面,我要她们的命。

葛莱古里要娘儿们的性命吗?

山普孙对了,娘儿们的性命,或是她们视同性命的童贞,你爱怎么说就怎么说。

葛莱古里那就要看对方怎样感觉了。

山普孙只要我下手,她们就会尝到我的辣手:就是有名的一身横肉呢。

葛莱古里幸而你还不是一身鱼肉;否则你便是一条可怜虫了。拔出你的家伙来;有两个蒙太古家的人来啦。

亚伯拉罕及鲍尔萨泽上。

山普孙我的剑已经出鞘;你去跟他们吵起来,我就在你背后帮你的忙。

葛莱古里怎么?你想转过背逃走吗?

山普孙你放心吧,我不是那样的人。

葛莱古里哼,我倒有点不放心!

山普孙还是让他们先动手,打起官司来也是咱们的理直。

葛莱古里我走过去向他们横个白眼,瞧他们怎么样。

山普孙好,瞧他们有没有胆量。我要向他们咬我的大拇指,瞧他们能不能忍受这样的侮辱。

亚伯拉罕你向我们咬你的大拇指吗?

山普孙我是咬我的大拇指。

亚伯拉罕你是向我们咬你的大拇指吗?

山普孙(向葛莱古里旁白)要是我说是,那么打起官司来是谁的理直?

葛莱古里(向山普孙旁白)是他们的理直。

山普孙不,我不是向你们咬我的大拇指;可是我是咬我的大拇指。

葛莱古里你是要向我们挑衅吗?

亚伯拉罕挑衅!不,哪儿的话。

山普孙你要是想跟我们吵架,那么我可以奉陪;你也是你家主子的奴才,我也是我家主子的奴才,难道我家的主子就比不上你家的主子?

亚伯拉罕比不上。

山普孙好。

葛莱古里(向山普孙旁白)说“比得上”;我家老爷的一位亲戚来了。

山普孙比得上。

亚伯拉罕你胡说。

山普孙是汉子就拔出剑来。葛莱古里,别忘了你的杀手剑。(双方互斗。)

班伏里奥上。

班伏里奥分开,蠢才!收起你们的剑;你们不知道你们在干些什么事。(击下众仆的剑。)

提伯尔特上。

提伯尔特怎么!你跟这些不中用的奴才吵架吗?过来,班伏里奥,让我结果你的性命。

班伏里奥我不过维持和平;收起你的剑,或者帮我分开这些人。

提伯尔特什么!你拔出了剑,还说什么和平?我痛恨这两个字,就跟我痛恨地狱、痛恨所有蒙太古家的人和你一样。照剑,懦夫!(二人相斗。)

两家各有若干人上,加入争斗;一群市民持枪棍继上。

众市民打!打!打!把他们打下来!打倒凯普莱特!打倒蒙太古!

凯普莱特穿长袍及凯普莱特夫人同上。

凯普莱特什么事吵得这个样子?喂!把我的长剑拿来。

凯普莱特夫人拐杖呢?拐杖呢?你要剑干什么?

凯普莱特快拿剑来!蒙太古那老东西来啦;他还晃着他的剑,明明在跟我寻事。

蒙太古及蒙太古夫人上。

蒙太古凯普莱特,你这奸贼!——别拉住我;让我走。

蒙太古夫人你要去跟人家吵架,我连一步也不让你走。

亲王率侍从上。

亲王目无法纪的臣民,扰乱治安的罪人,你们的刀剑都被你们邻人的血玷污了;——他们不听我的话吗?喂,听着!你们这些人,你们这些畜生,你们为了扑灭你们怨毒的怒焰,不惜让殷红的流泉从你们的血管里喷涌出来;他们要是畏惧刑法,赶快从你们血腥的手里丢下你们的凶器,静听你们震怒的君王的判决。凯普莱特,蒙太古,你们已经三次为了一句口头上的空言,引起了市民的械斗,扰乱了我们街道上的安宁,害得维洛那的年老公民,也不能不脱下他们尊严的装束,在他们习于安乐的苍老衰弱的手里夺过古旧的长枪,分解你们溃烂的纷争。要是你们以后再在市街上闹事,就要把你们的生命作为扰乱治安的代价。现在别人都给我退下去;凯普莱特,你跟我来;蒙太古,你今天下午到自由村的审判厅里来,听候我对于今天这一案的宣判。大家散开去,倘有逗留不去的,格杀勿论!(除蒙太古夫妇及班伏里奥外皆下。)

蒙太古这一场宿怨是谁又重新煽风点火?侄儿,对我说,他们动手的时候,你也在场吗?

班伏里奥我还没有到这儿来,您的仇家的仆人跟你们家里的仆人已经打成一团了。我拔出剑来分开他们;就在这时候,那个性如烈火的提伯尔特提着剑来了,他对我出言不逊,把剑在他自己头上舞得嗖嗖直响,就像风在那儿讥笑他的装腔作势一样。当我们正在剑来剑去的时候,人越来越多,有的帮这一面,有的帮那一面,乱哄哄地互相争斗,直等亲王来了,方才把两边的人喝开。

蒙太古夫人啊,罗密欧呢?你今天见过他吗?我很高兴他没有参加这场争斗。

班伏里奥伯母,在尊严的太阳开始从东方的黄金窗里探出头来的一小时以前,我因为心中烦闷,到郊外去散步,在城西一丛枫树的下面,我看见罗密欧兄弟一早在那儿走来走去。我正要向他走过去,他已经看见了我,就躲到树林深处去了。我因为自己也是心灰意懒,觉得连自己这一身也是多余的,只想找一处没有人迹的地方,所以凭着自己的心境推测别人的心境,也就不去找他多事,彼此互相避开了。

蒙太古好多天的早上曾经有人在那边看见过他,用眼泪洒为清晨的露水,用长叹嘘成天空的云雾;可是一等到鼓舞众生的太阳在东方的天边开始揭起黎明女神床上灰黑色的帐幕的时候,我那怀着一颗沉重的心的儿子,就逃避了光明,溜回到家里;一个人关起了门躲在房间里,闭紧了窗子,把大好的阳光锁在外面,为他自己造成了一个人工的黑夜。他这一种怪脾气恐怕不是好兆,除非良言劝告可以替他解除心头的烦恼。

班伏里奥伯父,您知道他的烦恼的根源吗?

蒙太古我不知道,也没有法子从他自己嘴里探听出来。

班伏里奥您有没有设法探问过他?

蒙太古我自己以及许多其他的朋友都曾经探问过他,可是他把心事一古脑儿闷在自己肚里,总是守口如瓶,不让人家试探出来,正像一条初生的蓓蕾,还没有迎风舒展它的嫩瓣,向太阳献吐它的娇艳,就给妒嫉的蛀虫咬啮了一样。只要能够知道他的悲哀究竟是从什么地方来的,我们一定会尽心竭力替他找寻治疗的方案。

班伏里奥瞧,他来了;请您站在一旁,等我去问问他究竟有些什么心事,看他理不理我。

蒙太古但愿你留在这儿,能够听到他的真情的吐露。来,夫人,我们去吧。(蒙太古夫妇同下。)

罗密欧上。

班伏里奥早安,兄弟。

罗密欧天还是这样早吗?

班伏里奥刚敲过九点钟。

罗密欧唉!在悲哀里度过的时间似乎是格外长的。急忙忙地走过去的那个人,不就是我的父亲吗?

班伏里奥正是。什么悲哀使罗密欧的时间过得这样长?

罗密欧因为我缺少了可以使时间变为短促的东西。

班伏里奥你跌进恋爱的网里了吗?

罗密欧我还在门外徘徊——

班伏里奥在恋爱的门外?

罗密欧我不能得到我的意中人的欢心。

班伏里奥唉!想不到爱神的外表这样温柔,实际上却是如此残暴!

罗密欧唉!想不到爱神蒙着眼睛,却会一直闯进人们的心灵!我们在什么地方吃饭?嗳哟!又是谁在这儿打过架了?可是不必告诉我,我早就知道了。这些都是怨恨造成的后果,可是爱情的力量比它要大过许多。啊,吵吵闹闹的相爱,亲亲热热的怨恨!啊,无中生有的一切!啊,沉重的轻浮,严肃的狂妄,整齐的混乱,铅铸的羽毛,光明的烟雾,寒冷的火焰,憔悴的健康,永远觉醒的睡眠,否定的存在!我感觉到的爱情正是这么一种东西,可是我并不喜爱这一种爱情。你不会笑我吗?

班伏里奥不,兄弟,我倒是有点儿想哭。

罗密欧好人,为什么呢?

班伏里奥因为瞧着你善良的心受到这样的痛苦。

罗密欧唉!这就是爱情的错误,我自己已经有太多的忧愁重压在我的心头,你对我表示的同情,徒然使我在太多的忧愁之上再加上一重忧愁。爱情是叹息吹起的一阵烟;恋人的眼中有它净化了的火星;恋人的眼泪是它激起的波涛。它又是最智慧的疯狂,哽喉的苦味,吃不到嘴的蜜糖。再见,兄弟。(欲去。)

班伏里奥且慢,让我跟你一块儿去;要是你就这样丢下了我,未免太不给我面子啦。

罗密欧嘿!我已经遗失了我自己;我不在这儿;这不是罗密欧,他是在别的地方。

班伏里奥老实告诉我,你所爱的是谁?

罗密欧什么!你要我在痛苦呻吟中说出她的名字来吗?

班伏里奥痛苦呻吟!不,你只要告诉我她是谁就得了。

罗密欧叫一个病人郑重其事地立起遗嘱来!啊,对于一个病重的人,还有什么比这更刺痛他的心?老实对你说,兄弟,我是爱上了一个女人。

班伏里奥我说你一定在恋爱,果然猜得不错。

罗密欧好一个每发必中的射手!我所爱的是一位美貌的姑娘。

班伏里奥好兄弟,目标越好,射得越准。

罗密欧你这一箭就射岔了。丘匹德的金箭不能射中她的心;她有狄安娜女神的圣洁,不让爱情软弱的弓矢损害她的坚不可破的贞操。她不愿听任深怜密爱的词句把她包围,也不愿让灼灼逼人的眼光向她进攻,更不愿接受可以使圣人动心的黄金的诱惑;啊!美貌便是她巨大的财富,只可惜她一死以后,她的美貌也要化为黄土!

班伏里奥那么她已经立誓终身守贞不嫁了吗?

罗密欧她已经立下了这样的誓言,为了珍惜她自己,造成了莫大的浪费;因为她让美貌在无情的岁月中日渐枯萎,不知道替后世传留下她的绝世容华。她是个太美丽、太聪明的人儿,不应该剥夺她自身的幸福,使我抱恨终天。她已经立誓割舍爱情,我现在活着也就等于死去一般。

班伏里奥听我的劝告,别再想起她了。

罗密欧啊!那么你教我怎样忘记吧。

班伏里奥你可以放纵你的眼睛,让它们多看几个世间的美人。

罗密欧那不过格外使我觉得她的美艳无双罢了。那些吻着美人娇额的幸运的面罩,因为它们是黑色的缘故,常常使我们想起被它们遮掩的面庞不知多么娇丽。突然盲目的人,永远不会忘记存留在他消失了的视觉中的宝贵的影像。给我着一个姿容绝代的美人,她的美貌除了使我记起世上有一个人比她更美以外,还有什么别的用处?再见,你不能教我怎样忘记。

班伏里奥我一定要证明我的意见不错,否则死不瞑目。(同下。)