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SCENE I. A Sea-port in Cyprus. An open place near the quay.

 

Enter MONTANO and two Gentlemen

MONTANO

What from the cape can you discern at sea?

First Gentleman

Nothing at all: it is a highwrought flood;
I cannot, 'twixt the heaven and the main,
Descry a sail.

MONTANO

Methinks the wind hath spoke aloud at land;
A fuller blast ne'er shook our battlements:
If it hath ruffian'd so upon the sea,
What ribs of oak, when mountains melt on them,
Can hold the mortise? What shall we hear of this?

Second Gentleman

A segregation of the Turkish fleet:
For do but stand upon the foaming shore,
The chidden billow seems to pelt the clouds;
The wind-shaked surge, with high and monstrous mane,
seems to cast water on the burning bear,
And quench the guards of the ever-fixed pole:
I never did like molestation view
On the enchafed flood.

MONTANO

If that the Turkish fleet
Be not enshelter'd and embay'd, they are drown'd:
It is impossible they bear it out.

Enter a third Gentleman

Third Gentleman

News, lads! our wars are done.
The desperate tempest hath so bang'd the Turks,
That their designment halts: a noble ship of Venice
Hath seen a grievous wreck and sufferance
On most part of their fleet.

MONTANO

How! is this true?

Third Gentleman

The ship is here put in,
A Veronesa; Michael Cassio,
Lieutenant to the warlike Moor Othello,
Is come on shore: the Moor himself at sea,
And is in full commission here for Cyprus.

MONTANO

I am glad on't; 'tis a worthy governor.

Third Gentleman

But this same Cassio, though he speak of comfort
Touching the Turkish loss, yet he looks sadly,
And prays the Moor be safe; for they were parted
With foul and violent tempest.

MONTANO

Pray heavens he be;
For I have served him, and the man commands
Like a full soldier. Let's to the seaside, ho!
As well to see the vessel that's come in
As to throw out our eyes for brave Othello,
Even till we make the main and the aerial blue
An indistinct regard.

Third Gentleman

Come, let's do so:
For every minute is expectancy
Of more arrivance.

Enter CASSIO

CASSIO

Thanks, you the valiant of this warlike isle,
That so approve the Moor! O, let the heavens
Give him defence against the elements,
For I have lost us him on a dangerous sea.

MONTANO

Is he well shipp'd?

CASSIO

His bark is stoutly timber'd, his pilot
Of very expert and approved allowance;
Therefore my hopes, not surfeited to death,
Stand in bold cure.

A cry within 'A sail, a sail, a sail!'

Enter a fourth Gentleman

CASSIO

What noise?

Fourth Gentleman

The town is empty; on the brow o' the sea
Stand ranks of people, and they cry 'A sail!'

CASSIO

My hopes do shape him for the governor.

Guns heard

Second Gentlemen

They do discharge their shot of courtesy:
Our friends at least.

CASSIO

I pray you, sir, go forth,
And give us truth who 'tis that is arrived.

Second Gentleman

I shall.

Exit

MONTANO

But, good lieutenant, is your general wived?

CASSIO

Most fortunately: he hath achieved a maid
That paragons description and wild fame;
One that excels the quirks of blazoning pens,
And in the essential vesture of creation
Does tire the ingener.

Re-enter second Gentleman

How now! who has put in?

Second Gentleman

'Tis one Iago, ancient to the general.

CASSIO

Has had most favourable and happy speed:
Tempests themselves, high seas, and howling winds,
The gutter'd rocks and congregated sands--
Traitors ensteep'd to clog the guiltless keel,--
As having sense of beauty, do omit
Their mortal natures, letting go safely by
The divine Desdemona.

MONTANO

What is she?

CASSIO

She that I spake of, our great captain's captain,
Left in the conduct of the bold Iago,
Whose footing here anticipates our thoughts
A se'nnight's speed. Great Jove, Othello guard,
And swell his sail with thine own powerful breath,
That he may bless this bay with his tall ship,
Make love's quick pants in Desdemona's arms,
Give renew'd fire to our extincted spirits
And bring all Cyprus comfort!

Enter DESDEMONA, EMILIA, IAGO, RODERIGO, and Attendants

O, behold,
The riches of the ship is come on shore!
Ye men of Cyprus, let her have your knees.
Hail to thee, lady! and the grace of heaven,
Before, behind thee, and on every hand,
Enwheel thee round!

DESDEMONA

I thank you, valiant Cassio.
What tidings can you tell me of my lord?

CASSIO

He is not yet arrived: nor know I aught
But that he's well and will be shortly here.

DESDEMONA

O, but I fear--How lost you company?

CASSIO

The great contention of the sea and skies
Parted our fellowship--But, hark! a sail.

Within 'A sail, a sail!' Guns heard

Second Gentleman

They give their greeting to the citadel;
This likewise is a friend.

CASSIO

See for the news.

Exit Gentleman

Good ancient, you are welcome.

To EMILIA

Welcome, mistress.
Let it not gall your patience, good Iago,
That I extend my manners; 'tis my breeding
That gives me this bold show of courtesy.

Kissing her

IAGO

Sir, would she give you so much of her lips
As of her tongue she oft bestows on me,
You'll have enough.

DESDEMONA

Alas, she has no speech.

IAGO

In faith, too much;
I find it still, when I have list to sleep:
Marry, before your ladyship, I grant,
She puts her tongue a little in her heart,
And chides with thinking.

EMILIA

You have little cause to say so.

IAGO

Come on, come on; you are pictures out of doors,
Bells in your parlors, wild-cats in your kitchens,
Saints m your injuries, devils being offended,
Players in your housewifery, and housewives' in your beds.

DESDEMONA

O, fie upon thee, slanderer!

IAGO

Nay, it is true, or else I am a Turk:
You rise to play and go to bed to work.

EMILIA

You shall not write my praise.

IAGO

No, let me not.

DESDEMONA

What wouldst thou write of me, if thou shouldst
praise me?

IAGO

O gentle lady, do not put me to't;
For I am nothing, if not critical.

DESDEMONA

Come on assay. There's one gone to the harbour?

IAGO

Ay, madam.

DESDEMONA

I am not merry; but I do beguile
The thing I am, by seeming otherwise.
Come, how wouldst thou praise me?

IAGO

I am about it; but indeed my invention
Comes from my pate as birdlime does from frize;
It plucks out brains and all: but my Muse labours,
And thus she is deliver'd.
If she be fair and wise, fairness and wit,
The one's for use, the other useth it.

DESDEMONA

Well praised! How if she be black and witty?

IAGO

If she be black, and thereto have a wit,
She'll find a white that shall her blackness fit.

DESDEMONA

Worse and worse.

EMILIA

How if fair and foolish?

IAGO

She never yet was foolish that was fair;
For even her folly help'd her to an heir.

DESDEMONA

These are old fond paradoxes to make fools laugh i'
the alehouse. What miserable praise hast thou for
her that's foul and foolish?

IAGO

There's none so foul and foolish thereunto,
But does foul pranks which fair and wise ones do.

DESDEMONA

O heavy ignorance! thou praisest the worst best.
But what praise couldst thou bestow on a deserving
woman indeed, one that, in the authority of her
merit, did justly put on the vouch of very malice itself?

IAGO

She that was ever fair and never proud,
Had tongue at will and yet was never loud,
Never lack'd gold and yet went never gay,
Fled from her wish and yet said 'Now I may,'
She that being anger'd, her revenge being nigh,
Bade her wrong stay and her displeasure fly,
She that in wisdom never was so frail
To change the cod's head for the salmon's tail;
She that could think and ne'er disclose her mind,
See suitors following and not look behind,
She was a wight, if ever such wight were,--

DESDEMONA

To do what?

IAGO

To suckle fools and chronicle small beer.

DESDEMONA

O most lame and impotent conclusion! Do not learn
of him, Emilia, though he be thy husband. How say
you, Cassio? is he not a most profane and liberal
counsellor?

CASSIO

He speaks home, madam: You may relish him more in
the soldier than in the scholar.

IAGO

[Aside] He takes her by the palm: ay, well said,
whisper: with as little a web as this will I
ensnare as great a fly as Cassio. Ay, smile upon
her, do; I will gyve thee in thine own courtship.
You say true; 'tis so, indeed: if such tricks as
these strip you out of your lieutenantry, it had
been better you had not kissed your three fingers so
oft, which now again you are most apt to play the
sir in. Very good; well kissed! an excellent
courtesy! 'tis so, indeed. Yet again your fingers
to your lips? would they were clyster-pipes for your sake!

Trumpet within

The Moor! I know his trumpet.

CASSIO

'Tis truly so.

DESDEMONA

Let's meet him and receive him.

CASSIO

Lo, where he comes!

Enter OTHELLO and Attendants

OTHELLO

O my fair warrior!

DESDEMONA

My dear Othello!

OTHELLO

It gives me wonder great as my content
To see you here before me. O my soul's joy!
If after every tempest come such calms,
May the winds blow till they have waken'd death!
And let the labouring bark climb hills of seas
Olympus-high and duck again as low
As hell's from heaven! If it were now to die,
'Twere now to be most happy; for, I fear,
My soul hath her content so absolute
That not another comfort like to this
Succeeds in unknown fate.

DESDEMONA

The heavens forbid
But that our loves and comforts should increase,
Even as our days do grow!

OTHELLO

Amen to that, sweet powers!
I cannot speak enough of this content;
It stops me here; it is too much of joy:
And this, and this, the greatest discords be

Kissing her

That e'er our hearts shall make!

IAGO

[Aside] O, you are well tuned now!
But I'll set down the pegs that make this music,
As honest as I am.

OTHELLO

Come, let us to the castle.
News, friends; our wars are done, the Turks
are drown'd.
How does my old acquaintance of this isle?
Honey, you shall be well desired in Cyprus;
I have found great love amongst them. O my sweet,
I prattle out of fashion, and I dote
In mine own comforts. I prithee, good Iago,
Go to the bay and disembark my coffers:
Bring thou the master to the citadel;
He is a good one, and his worthiness
Does challenge much respect. Come, Desdemona,
Once more, well met at Cyprus.

Exeunt OTHELLO, DESDEMONA, and Attendants

IAGO

Do thou meet me presently at the harbour. Come
hither. If thou be'st valiant,-- as, they say, base
men being in love have then a nobility in their
natures more than is native to them--list me. The
lieutenant tonight watches on the court of
guard:--first, I must tell thee this--Desdemona is
directly in love with him.

RODERIGO

With him! why, 'tis not possible.

IAGO

Lay thy finger thus, and let thy soul be instructed.
Mark me with what violence she first loved the Moor,
but for bragging and telling her fantastical lies:
and will she love him still for prating? let not
thy discreet heart think it. Her eye must be fed;
and what delight shall she have to look on the
devil? When the blood is made dull with the act of
sport, there should be, again to inflame it and to
give satiety a fresh appetite, loveliness in favour,
sympathy in years, manners and beauties; all which
the Moor is defective in: now, for want of these
required conveniences, her delicate tenderness will
find itself abused, begin to heave the gorge,
disrelish and abhor the Moor; very nature will
instruct her in it and compel her to some second
choice. Now, sir, this granted,--as it is a most
pregnant and unforced position--who stands so
eminent in the degree of this fortune as Cassio
does? a knave very voluble; no further
conscionable than in putting on the mere form of
civil and humane seeming, for the better compassing
of his salt and most hidden loose affection? why,
none; why, none: a slipper and subtle knave, a
finder of occasions, that has an eye can stamp and
counterfeit advantages, though true advantage never
present itself; a devilish knave. Besides, the
knave is handsome, young, and hath all those
requisites in him that folly and green minds look
after: a pestilent complete knave; and the woman
hath found him already.

RODERIGO

I cannot believe that in her; she's full of
most blessed condition.

IAGO

Blessed fig's-end! the wine she drinks is made of
grapes: if she had been blessed, she would never
have loved the Moor. Blessed pudding! Didst thou
not see her paddle with the palm of his hand? didst
not mark that?

RODERIGO

Yes, that I did; but that was but courtesy.

IAGO

Lechery, by this hand; an index and obscure prologue
to the history of lust and foul thoughts. They met
so near with their lips that their breaths embraced
together. Villanous thoughts, Roderigo! when these
mutualities so marshal the way, hard at hand comes
the master and main exercise, the incorporate
conclusion, Pish! But, sir, be you ruled by me: I
have brought you from Venice. Watch you to-night;
for the command, I'll lay't upon you. Cassio knows
you not. I'll not be far from you: do you find
some occasion to anger Cassio, either by speaking
too loud, or tainting his discipline; or from what
other course you please, which the time shall more
favourably minister.

RODERIGO

Well.

IAGO

Sir, he is rash and very sudden in choler, and haply
may strike at you: provoke him, that he may; for
even out of that will I cause these of Cyprus to
mutiny; whose qualification shall come into no true
taste again but by the displanting of Cassio. So
shall you have a shorter journey to your desires by
the means I shall then have to prefer them; and the
impediment most profitably removed, without the
which there were no expectation of our prosperity.

RODERIGO

I will do this, if I can bring it to any
opportunity.

IAGO

I warrant thee. Meet me by and by at the citadel:
I must fetch his necessaries ashore. Farewell.

RODERIGO

Adieu.

Exit

IAGO

That Cassio loves her, I do well believe it;
That she loves him, 'tis apt and of great credit:
The Moor, howbeit that I endure him not,
Is of a constant, loving, noble nature,
And I dare think he'll prove to Desdemona
A most dear husband. Now, I do love her too;
Not out of absolute lust, though peradventure
I stand accountant for as great a sin,
But partly led to diet my revenge,
For that I do suspect the lusty Moor
Hath leap'd into my seat; the thought whereof
Doth, like a poisonous mineral, gnaw my inwards;
And nothing can or shall content my soul
Till I am even'd with him, wife for wife,
Or failing so, yet that I put the Moor
At least into a jealousy so strong
That judgment cannot cure. Which thing to do,
If this poor trash of Venice, whom I trash
For his quick hunting, stand the putting on,
I'll have our Michael Cassio on the hip,
Abuse him to the Moor in the rank garb--
For I fear Cassio with my night-cap too--
Make the Moor thank me, love me and reward me.
For making him egregiously an ass
And practising upon his peace and quiet
Even to madness. 'Tis here, but yet confused:
Knavery's plain face is never seen tin used.

Exit

第二幕 第一场 塞浦路斯岛海口一市镇 码头附近的广场

蒙太诺及二军官上。

蒙太诺你从那海岬望出去,看见海里有什么船只没有?

军官甲一点望不见。波浪很高,在海天之间,我看不见一片船帆。

蒙太诺风在陆地上吹得也很厉害;从来不曾有这么大的暴风摇撼过我们的雉堞。要是它在海上也这么猖狂,哪一艘橡树造成的船身支持得住山一样的巨涛迎头倒下?我们将要从这场风暴中间听到什么消息呢?

军官乙土耳其的舰队一定要被风浪冲散了。你只要站在白沫飞溅的海岸上,就可以看见咆哮的汹涛直冲云霄,被狂风卷起的怒浪奔腾山立,好像要把海水浇向光明的大熊星上,熄灭那照耀北极的永古不移的斗宿一样。我从来没有见过这样可怕的惊涛骇浪。

蒙太诺要是土耳其舰队没有避进港里,它们一定沉没了;这样的风浪是抵御不了的。

另一军官上。

军官丙报告消息!咱们的战事已经结束了。土耳其人遭受这场风暴的突击,不得不放弃他们进攻的计划。一艘从威尼斯来的大船一路上看见他们的船只或沉或破,大部分零落不堪。

蒙太诺啊!这是真的吗?

军官丙大船已经在这儿进港,是一艘维洛那造的船;迈克尔·凯西奥,那勇武的摩尔人奥赛罗的副将,已经上岸来了;那摩尔人自己还在海上,他是奉到全权委任,到塞浦路斯这儿来的。

蒙太诺我很高兴,这是一位很有才能的总督。

军官丙可是这个凯西奥说起土耳其的损失,虽然兴高采烈,同时却满脸愁容,祈祷着那摩尔人的安全,因为他们是在险恶的大风浪中彼此失散的。

蒙太诺但愿他平安无恙;因为我曾经在他手下做过事,知道他在治军用兵这方面,的确是一个大将之才。来,让我们到海边去!一方面看看新到的船舶,一方面把我们的眼睛遥望到海天相接的远处,盼候着勇敢的奥赛罗。

军官丙来,我们去吧;因为每一分钟都会有更多的人到来。

凯西奥上。

凯西奥谢谢,你们这座尚武的岛上的各位壮士,因为你们这样褒奖我们的主帅。啊!但愿上天帮助他战胜风浪,因为我是在险恶的波涛之中和他失散的。

蒙太诺他的船靠得住吗?

凯西奥船身很坚固,舵师是一个大家公认的很有经验的人,所以我还抱着很大的希望。(内呼声:“一条船!一条船!一条船!”)

一使者上。

凯西奥什么声音?

使者全市的人都出来了;海边站满了人,他们在嚷,“一条船!一条船!”

凯西奥我希望那就是我们新任的总督。(炮声。)

军官乙他们在放礼炮了;即使不是总督,至少也是我们的朋友。

凯西奥请你去看一看,回来告诉我们究竟是什么人来了。

军官乙我就去。(下。)

蒙太诺可是,副将,你们主帅有没有结过婚?

凯西奥他的婚姻是再幸福不过的。他娶到了一位小姐,她的美貌才德,胜过一切的形容和盛大的名誉;笔墨的赞美不能写尽她的好处,没有一句适当的言语可以充分表出她的天赋的优美。

军官乙重上。

凯西奥啊!谁到来了?

军官乙是元帅麾下的一个旗官,名叫伊阿古。

凯西奥他倒一帆风顺地到了。汹涌的怒涛,咆哮的狂风,埋伏在海底、跟往来的船只作对的礁石沙碛,似乎也懂得爱惜美人,收敛了它们凶恶的本性,让神圣的苔丝狄蒙娜安然通过。

蒙太诺她是谁?

凯西奥就是我刚才说起的,我们大帅的主帅。勇敢的伊阿古护送她到这儿来,想不到他们路上走得这么快,比我们的预期还早七天。伟大的乔武啊,保佑奥赛罗,吹一口你的大力的气息在他的船帆上,让他的高大的桅樯在这儿海港里显现它的雄姿,让他跳动着一颗恋人的心投进了苔丝狄蒙娜的怀里,重新燃起我们奄奄欲绝的精神,使整个塞浦路斯充满了兴奋!

苔丝狄蒙娜、爱米利娅、伊阿古、罗德利哥及侍从等上。

凯西奥啊!瞧,船上的珍宝到岸上来了。塞浦路斯人啊,向她下跪吧。祝福你,夫人!愿神灵在你前后左右周遭呵护你!

苔丝狄蒙娜谢谢您,英勇的凯西奥。您知道我丈夫的什么消息吗?

凯西奥他还没有到来;我只知道他是平安的,大概不久就会到来。

苔丝狄蒙娜啊!可是我怕——你们怎么会分散的?

凯西奥天风和海水的猛烈的激战,使我们彼此失散。可是听!有船来了。(内呼声:“一条船!一条船!”炮声。)

军官乙他们向我们城上放礼炮了;到来的也是我们的朋友。

凯西奥你去探看探看。(军官乙下。向伊阿古)老总,欢迎!(向爱米利娅)欢迎,嫂子!请你不要恼怒,好伊阿古,我总得讲究个礼貌,按照我的教养,我就得来这么一个大胆的见面礼。(吻爱米利娅。)

伊阿古老兄,要是她向你掀动她的嘴唇,也像她向我掀动她的舌头一样,那你就要叫苦不迭了。

苔丝狄蒙娜唉!她又不会多嘴。

伊阿古真的,她太会多嘴了;每次我想睡觉的时候,总是被她吵得不得安宁。不过,在您夫人的面前,我还要说一句,她有些话是放在心里说的,人家瞧她不开口,她却在心里骂人。

爱米利娅你没有理由这样冤枉我。

伊阿古得啦,得啦,你们跑出门来像图画,走进房去像响铃,到了灶下像野猫;害人的时候,面子上装得像个圣徒,人家冒犯了你们,你们便活像夜叉;叫你们管家,你们只会一味胡闹,一上床却又十足像个忙碌的主妇。

苔丝狄蒙娜啊,啐!你这毁谤女人的家伙!

伊阿古不,我说的话儿千真万确,

你们起来游戏,上床工作。

爱米利娅我再也不要你给我编什么赞美诗了。

伊阿古好,不要叫我编。

苔丝狄蒙娜要是叫你赞美我,你要怎么编法呢?

伊阿古啊,好夫人,别叫我做这件事,因为我的脾气是要吹毛求疵的。

苔丝狄蒙娜来,试试看。有人到港口去了吗?

伊阿古是,夫人。

苔丝狄蒙娜我虽然心里愁闷,姑且强作欢容。来,你怎么赞美我?

伊阿古我正在想着呢;可是我的诗情粘在我的脑壳里,用力一挤就会把脑浆一起挤出的。我的诗神可在难产呢——有了——好容易把孩子养出来了:

她要是既漂亮又智慧,

就不会误用她的娇美。

苔丝狄蒙娜赞美得好!要是她虽黑丑而聪明呢?

伊阿古她要是虽黑丑却聪明,包她找到一位俊郎君。

苔丝狄蒙娜不成话。

爱米利娅要是美貌而愚笨呢?

伊阿古美女人决不是笨冬瓜,

蠢煞也会抱个小娃娃。

苔丝狄蒙娜这些都是在酒店里骗傻瓜们笑笑的古老的歪诗。还有一种又丑又笨的女人,你也能够勉强赞美她两句吗?

伊阿古别嫌她心肠笨相貌丑,

女人的戏法一样拿手。

苔丝狄蒙娜啊,岂有此理!你把最好的赞美给了最坏的女人。可是对于一个贤惠的女人——就连天生的坏蛋看见她这么好,也不由得对天起誓,说她真是个好女人——你又怎么赞美她呢?

伊阿古她长得美,却从不骄傲,

能说会道,却从不叫嚣;

有的是钱,但从不妖娆;

摆脱欲念,嘴里说“我要!”

她受人气恼,想把仇报,

却平了气,把烦恼打消;

明白懂事,不朝三暮四,

不拿鳕鱼头换鲑鱼翅;①(鳕鱼头比喻傻瓜;全句意谓:嫁了傻瓜,并不另找漂亮的相好。

会动脑筋,却闭紧小嘴,

有人钉梢,她头也不回;

要是有这样的女娇娘——

苔丝狄蒙娜要她干什么呢?

伊阿古去奶傻孩子,去记油盐账。

苔丝狄蒙娜啊,这可真是最蹩脚、最松劲的收梢!爱米利娅,不要听他的话,虽然他是你的丈夫。你怎么说,凯西奥?他不是一个粗俗的、胡说八道的家伙吗?

凯西奥他说得很直爽,夫人。您要是把他当作一个军人,不把他当作一个文士,您就不会嫌他出言粗俗了。

伊阿古(旁白)他捏着她的手心。嗯,交头接耳,好得很。我只要张起这么一个小小的网,就可以捉住像凯西奥这样一只大苍蝇。嗯,对她微笑,很好;我要叫你跌翻在你自己的礼貌中间。——您说得对,正是正是。——要是这种鬼殷勤会葬送你的前程,你还是不要老是吻着你的三个指头,表示你的绅士风度吧。很好;吻得不错!绝妙的礼貌!正是正是。又把你的手指放到你的嘴唇上去了吗?让你的手指头变做你的通肠管我才高兴呢。(喇叭声)主师来了!我听得出他的喇叭声音。

凯西奥真的是他。

苔丝狄蒙娜让我们去迎接他。

凯西奥瞧!他来了。

奥赛罗及侍从等上。

奥赛罗啊,我的娇美的战士!

苔丝狄蒙娜我的亲爱的奥赛罗!

奥赛罗看见你比我先到这里,真使我又惊又喜。啊,我的心爱的人!要是每一次暴风雨之后,都有这样和煦的阳光,那么尽管让狂风肆意地吹,把死亡都吹醒了吧!让那辛苦挣扎的船舶爬上一座座如山的高浪,就像从高高的云上堕下幽深的地狱一般,一泻千丈地跌下来吧!要是我现在死去,那才是最幸福的;因为我怕我的灵魂已经尝到了无上的欢乐,此生此世,再也不会有同样令人欣喜的事情了。

苔丝狄蒙娜但愿上天眷顾,让我们的爱情和欢乐与日俱增!

奥赛罗阿门,慈悲的神明!我不能充分说出我心头的快乐;太多的欢喜憋住了我的呼吸。(吻苔丝狄蒙娜)一个——再来一个——这便是两颗心儿间最大的冲突了。

伊阿古(旁白)啊,你们现在是琴瑟调和,看我不动声色,就叫你们松了弦线走了音。

奥赛罗来,让我们到城堡里去。好消息,朋友们;我们的战事已经结束,土耳其人全都淹死了。我的岛上的旧友,您好?爱人,你在塞浦路斯将要受到众人的宠爱,我觉得他们都是非常热情的。啊,亲爱的,我自己太高兴了,所以会做出这样忘形的话来。好伊阿古,请你到港口去一趟,把我的箱子搬到岸上。带那船长到城堡里来;他是一个很好的家伙,他的才能非常叫人钦佩。来,苔丝狄蒙娜,我们又在塞浦路斯岛团圆了。(除伊阿古、罗德利哥外均下。)

伊阿古你马上就到港口来会我。过来。人家说,爱情可以刺激懦夫,使他鼓起本来所没有的勇气;要是你果然有胆量,请听我说。副将今晚在卫舍守夜。第一我必须告诉你,苔丝狄蒙娜直截了当地跟他发生了恋爱。

罗德利哥跟他发生了恋爱!那是不会有的事。

伊阿古闭住你的嘴,好好听我说。你看她当初不过因为这摩尔人向她吹了些法螺,撒下了一些漫天的大谎,她就爱得他那么热烈;难道她会继续爱他,只是为了他的吹牛的本领吗?你是个聪明人,不要以为世上会有这样的事。她的视觉必须得到满足;她能够从魔鬼脸上感到什么佳趣?情欲在一阵兴奋过了以后而渐生厌倦的时候,必须换一换新鲜的口味,方才可以把它重新刺激起来,或者是容貌的漂亮,或者是年龄的相称,或者是举止的风雅,这些都是这摩尔人所欠缺的;她因为在这些必要的方面不能得到满足,一定会觉得她的青春娇艳所托非人,而开始对这摩尔人由失望而憎恨,由憎恨而厌恶,她的天性就会迫令她再作第二次的选择。这种情形是很自然而可能的;要是承认了这一点,试问哪一个人比凯西奥更有享受这一种福分的便利?一个很会讲话的家伙,为了达到他的秘密的淫邪的欲望,他会恬不为意地装出一副殷勤文雅的外表。哼,谁也比不上他;哼,谁也比不上他!一个狡猾阴险的家伙,惯会乘机取利,无孔不钻——钻得进钻不进他才不管呢。一个鬼一样的家伙!而且,这家伙又漂亮,又年轻,凡是可以使无知妇女醉心的条件,他无一不备;一个十足害人的家伙。这女人已经把他勾上了。

罗德利哥我不能相信,她是一位圣洁的女人。

伊阿古他妈的圣洁!她喝的酒也是用葡萄酿成的;她要是圣洁,她就不会爱这摩尔人了。哼,圣洁!你没有看见她捏他的手心吗?你没有看见吗?

罗德利哥是的,我看见的;可是那不过是礼貌罢了。

伊阿古我举手为誓,这明明是奸淫!这一段意味深长的楔子,就包括无限淫情欲念的交流。他们的嘴唇那么贴近,他们的呼吸简直互相拥抱了。该死的思想,罗德利哥!这种表面上的亲热一开了端,主要的好戏就会跟着上场,肉体的结合是必然的结论。呸!可是,老兄,你依着我的话做去。我特意把你从威尼斯带来,今晚你去值班守夜,我会给你把命令弄来;凯西奥是不认识你的;我就在离你不远的地方看着你;你见了凯西奥就找一些借口向他挑衅,或者高声辱骂,破坏他的军纪,或者随你的意思用其他无论什么比较适当的方法。

罗德利哥好。

伊阿古老兄,他是个性情暴躁、易于发怒的人,也许会向你动武;即使他不动武,你也要激动他和你打起架来;因为借着这一个理由,我就可以在塞浦路斯人中间煽起一场暴动,假如要平息他们的愤怒,除了把凯西奥解职以外没有其他方法。这样你就可以在我的设计协助之下,早日达到你的愿望,你的阻碍也可以从此除去,否则我们的事情是决无成功之望的。

罗德利哥我愿意这样干,要是我能够找到下手的机会。

伊阿古那我可以向你保证。等会儿在城门口见我。我现在必须去替他把应用物件搬上岸来。再会。

罗德利哥再会。(下。)

伊阿古凯西奥爱她,这一点我是可以充分相信的;她爱凯西奥,这也是一件很自然而可能的事。这摩尔人我虽然气他不过,却有一副坚定、仁爱、正直的性格;我相信他会对苔丝狄蒙娜做一个最多情的丈夫。讲到我自己,我也是爱她的,并不完全出于情欲的冲动——虽然也许我犯的罪名也并不轻一些儿——可是一半是为要报复我的仇恨,因为我疑心这好色的摩尔人已经跳上了我的坐骑。这一种思想像毒药一样腐蚀我的肝肠,什么都不能使我心满意足,除非老婆对老婆,在他身上发泄这一口怨气;即使不能做到这一点,我也要叫这摩尔人心里长起根深蒂固的嫉妒来,没有一种理智的药饵可以把它治疗。为了达到这一个目的,我已经利用这威尼斯的瘟生做我的鹰犬;要是他果然听我的嗾使,我就可以抓住我们那位迈克尔·凯西奥的把柄,在这摩尔人面前大大地诽谤他——因为我疑心凯西奥跟我的妻子也是有些暧昧的。这样我可以让这摩尔人感谢我、喜欢我、报答我,因为我叫他做了一头大大的驴子,用诡计捣乱他的平和安宁,使他因气愤而发疯。方针已经决定,前途未可预料;阴谋的面目直到下手才会揭晓。(下。)