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SCENE I. Venice. A street.

 

Enter RODERIGO and IAGO

RODERIGO

Tush! never tell me; I take it much unkindly
That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse
As if the strings were thine, shouldst know of this.

IAGO

'Sblood, but you will not hear me:
If ever I did dream of such a matter, Abhor me.

RODERIGO

Thou told'st me thou didst hold him in thy hate.

IAGO

Despise me, if I do not. Three great ones of the city,
In personal suit to make me his lieutenant,
Off-capp'd to him: and, by the faith of man,
I know my price, I am worth no worse a place:
But he; as loving his own pride and purposes,
Evades them, with a bombast circumstance
Horribly stuff'd with epithets of war;
And, in conclusion,
Nonsuits my mediators; for, 'Certes,' says he,
'I have already chose my officer.'
And what was he?
Forsooth, a great arithmetician,
One Michael Cassio, a Florentine,
A fellow almost damn'd in a fair wife;
That never set a squadron in the field,
Nor the division of a battle knows
More than a spinster; unless the bookish theoric,
Wherein the toged consuls can propose
As masterly as he: mere prattle, without practise,
Is all his soldiership. But he, sir, had the election:
And I, of whom his eyes had seen the proof
At Rhodes, at Cyprus and on other grounds
Christian and heathen, must be be-lee'd and calm'd
By debitor and creditor: this counter-caster,
He, in good time, must his lieutenant be,
And I--God bless the mark!--his Moorship's ancient.

RODERIGO

By heaven, I rather would have been his hangman.

IAGO

Why, there's no remedy; 'tis the curse of service,
Preferment goes by letter and affection,
And not by old gradation, where each second
Stood heir to the first. Now, sir, be judge yourself,
Whether I in any just term am affined
To love the Moor.

RODERIGO

I would not follow him then.

IAGO

O, sir, content you;
I follow him to serve my turn upon him:
We cannot all be masters, nor all masters
Cannot be truly follow'd. You shall mark
Many a duteous and knee-crooking knave,
That, doting on his own obsequious bondage,
Wears out his time, much like his master's ass,
For nought but provender, and when he's old, cashier'd:
Whip me such honest knaves. Others there are
Who, trimm'd in forms and visages of duty,
Keep yet their hearts attending on themselves,
And, throwing but shows of service on their lords,
Do well thrive by them and when they have lined
their coats
Do themselves homage: these fellows have some soul;
And such a one do I profess myself. For, sir,
It is as sure as you are Roderigo,
Were I the Moor, I would not be Iago:
In following him, I follow but myself;
Heaven is my judge, not I for love and duty,
But seeming so, for my peculiar end:
For when my outward action doth demonstrate
The native act and figure of my heart
In compliment extern, 'tis not long after
But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve
For daws to peck at: I am not what I am.

RODERIGO

What a full fortune does the thicklips owe
If he can carry't thus!

IAGO

Call up her father,
Rouse him: make after him, poison his delight,
Proclaim him in the streets; incense her kinsmen,
And, though he in a fertile climate dwell,
Plague him with flies: though that his joy be joy,
Yet throw such changes of vexation on't,
As it may lose some colour.

RODERIGO

Here is her father's house; I'll call aloud.

IAGO

Do, with like timorous accent and dire yell
As when, by night and negligence, the fire
Is spied in populous cities.

RODERIGO

What, ho, Brabantio! Signior Brabantio, ho!

IAGO

Awake! what, ho, Brabantio! thieves! thieves! thieves!
Look to your house, your daughter and your bags!
Thieves! thieves!

BRABANTIO appears above, at a window

BRABANTIO

What is the reason of this terrible summons?
What is the matter there?

RODERIGO

Signior, is all your family within?

IAGO

Are your doors lock'd?

BRABANTIO

Why, wherefore ask you this?

IAGO

'Zounds, sir, you're robb'd; for shame, put on
your gown;
Your heart is burst, you have lost half your soul;
Even now, now, very now, an old black ram
Is topping your white ewe. Arise, arise;
Awake the snorting citizens with the bell,
Or else the devil will make a grandsire of you:
Arise, I say.

BRABANTIO

What, have you lost your wits?

RODERIGO

Most reverend signior, do you know my voice?

BRABANTIO

Not I what are you?

RODERIGO

My name is Roderigo.

BRABANTIO

The worser welcome:
I have charged thee not to haunt about my doors:
In honest plainness thou hast heard me say
My daughter is not for thee; and now, in madness,
Being full of supper and distempering draughts,
Upon malicious bravery, dost thou come
To start my quiet.

RODERIGO

Sir, sir, sir,--

BRABANTIO

But thou must needs be sure
My spirit and my place have in them power
To make this bitter to thee.

RODERIGO

Patience, good sir.

BRABANTIO

What tell'st thou me of robbing? this is Venice;
My house is not a grange.

RODERIGO

Most grave Brabantio,
In simple and pure soul I come to you.

IAGO

'Zounds, sir, you are one of those that will not
serve God, if the devil bid you. Because we come to
do you service and you think we are ruffians, you'll
have your daughter covered with a Barbary horse;
you'll have your nephews neigh to you; you'll have
coursers for cousins and gennets for germans.

BRABANTIO

What profane wretch art thou?

IAGO

I am one, sir, that comes to tell you your daughter
and the Moor are now making the beast with two backs.

BRABANTIO

Thou art a villain.

IAGO

You are--a senator.

BRABANTIO

This thou shalt answer; I know thee, Roderigo.

RODERIGO

Sir, I will answer any thing. But, I beseech you,
If't be your pleasure and most wise consent,
As partly I find it is, that your fair daughter,
At this odd-even and dull watch o' the night,
Transported, with no worse nor better guard
But with a knave of common hire, a gondolier,
To the gross clasps of a lascivious Moor--
If this be known to you and your allowance,
We then have done you bold and saucy wrongs;
But if you know not this, my manners tell me
We have your wrong rebuke. Do not believe
That, from the sense of all civility,
I thus would play and trifle with your reverence:
Your daughter, if you have not given her leave,
I say again, hath made a gross revolt;
Tying her duty, beauty, wit and fortunes
In an extravagant and wheeling stranger
Of here and every where. Straight satisfy yourself:
If she be in her chamber or your house,
Let loose on me the justice of the state
For thus deluding you.

BRABANTIO

Strike on the tinder, ho!
Give me a taper! call up all my people!
This accident is not unlike my dream:
Belief of it oppresses me already.
Light, I say! light!

Exit above

IAGO

Farewell; for I must leave you:
It seems not meet, nor wholesome to my place,
To be produced--as, if I stay, I shall--
Against the Moor: for, I do know, the state,
However this may gall him with some cheque,
Cannot with safety cast him, for he's embark'd
With such loud reason to the Cyprus wars,
Which even now stand in act, that, for their souls,
Another of his fathom they have none,
To lead their business: in which regard,
Though I do hate him as I do hell-pains.
Yet, for necessity of present life,
I must show out a flag and sign of love,
Which is indeed but sign. That you shall surely find him,
Lead to the Sagittary the raised search;
And there will I be with him. So, farewell.

Exit

Enter, below, BRABANTIO, and Servants with torches

BRABANTIO

It is too true an evil: gone she is;
And what's to come of my despised time
Is nought but bitterness. Now, Roderigo,
Where didst thou see her? O unhappy girl!
With the Moor, say'st thou? Who would be a father!
How didst thou know 'twas she? O she deceives me
Past thought! What said she to you? Get more tapers:
Raise all my kindred. Are they married, think you?

RODERIGO

Truly, I think they are.

BRABANTIO

O heaven! How got she out? O treason of the blood!
Fathers, from hence trust not your daughters' minds
By what you see them act. Is there not charms
By which the property of youth and maidhood
May be abused? Have you not read, Roderigo,
Of some such thing?

RODERIGO

Yes, sir, I have indeed.

BRABANTIO

Call up my brother. O, would you had had her!
Some one way, some another. Do you know
Where we may apprehend her and the Moor?

RODERIGO

I think I can discover him, if you please,
To get good guard and go along with me.

BRABANTIO

Pray you, lead on. At every house I'll call;
I may command at most. Get weapons, ho!
And raise some special officers of night.
On, good Roderigo: I'll deserve your pains.

Exeunt

罗德利哥及伊阿古上。

罗德利哥嘿!别对我说,伊阿古;我把我的钱袋交给你支配,让你随意花用,你却做了他们的同谋,这太不够朋友啦。

伊阿古他妈的!你总不肯听我说下去。要是我做梦会想到这种事情,你不要把我当做一个人。

罗德利哥你告诉我你恨他。

伊阿古要是我不恨他,你从此别理我。这城里的三个当道要人亲自向他打招呼,举荐我做他的副将;凭良心说,我知道我自己的价值,难道我就做不得一个副将?可是他眼睛里只有自己没有别人,对于他们的请求,都用一套充满了军事上口头禅的空话回绝了;因为,他说,“我已经选定我的将佐了。”他选中的是个什么人呢?哼,一个算学大家,一个叫做迈克尔·凯西奥的弗罗棱萨人,一个几乎因为娶了娇妻而误了终身的家伙;他从来不曾在战场上领过一队兵,对于布阵作战的知识,懂得简直也不比一个老守空闺的女人多;即使懂得一些书本上的理论,那些身穿宽袍的元老大人们讲起来也会比他更头头是道;只有空谈,不切实际,这就是他的全部的军人资格。可是,老兄,他居然得到了任命;我在罗得斯岛、塞浦路斯岛,以及其他基督徒和异教徒的国土之上,立过多少的军功,都是他亲眼看见的,现在却必须低首下心,受一个市侩的指挥。这位掌柜居然做起他的副将来,而我呢——上帝恕我这样说——却只在这位黑将军的麾下充一名旗官。

罗德利哥天哪,我宁愿做他的刽子手。

伊阿古这也是没有办法呀。说来真叫人恼恨,军队里的升迁可以全然不管古来的定法,按照各人的阶级依次递补,只要谁的脚力大,能够得到上官的欢心,就可以越级躐升。现在,老兄,请你替我评一评,我究竟有什么理由要跟这摩尔人要好。

罗德利哥假如是我,我就不愿跟随他。

伊阿古啊,老兄,你放心吧;我所以跟随他,不过是要利用他达到我自己的目的。我们不能每个人都是主人,每个主人也不是都该让仆人忠心地追随他。你可以看到,有一辈天生的奴才,他们卑躬屈节,拚命讨主人的好,甘心受主人的鞭策,像一头驴子似的,为了一些粮草而出卖他们的一生,等到年纪老了,主人就把他们撵走;这种老实的奴才是应该抽一顿鞭子的。还有一种人,表面上尽管装出一副鞠躬如也的样子,骨子里却是为他们自己打算;看上去好像替主人做事,实际却靠着主人发展自己的势力,等捞足了油水,就可以知道他所尊敬的其实是他本人;像这种人还有几分头脑;我承认我自己就属于这一类。因为,老兄,正像你是罗德利哥而不是别人一样,我要是做了那摩尔人,我就不会是伊阿古。同样地没有错,虽说我跟随他,其实还是跟随我自己。上天是我的公证人,我这样对他陪着小心,既不是为了忠心,也不是为了义务,只是为了自己的利益,才装出这一副假脸。要是我表面上的恭而敬之的行为会泄露我内心的活动,那么不久我就要掬出我的心来,让乌鸦们乱啄了。世人所知道的我,并不是实在的我。

罗德利哥要是那厚嘴唇的家伙也有这么一手,那可让他交上大运了!

伊阿古叫起她的父亲来;不要放过他,打断他的兴致,在各处街道上宣布他的罪恶;激怒她的亲族。让他虽然住在气候宜人的地方,也免不了受蚊蝇的滋扰,虽然享受着盛大的欢乐,也免不了受烦恼的缠绕。

罗德利哥这儿就是她父亲的家;我要高声叫喊。

伊阿古很好,你嚷起来吧,就像在一座人口众多的城里,因为晚间失慎而起火的时候,人们用那种惊骇惶恐的声音呼喊一样。

罗德利哥喂,喂,勃拉班修!勃拉班修先生,喂!

伊阿古醒来!喂,喂!勃拉班修!捉贼!捉贼!捉贼!留心你的屋子、你的女儿和你的钱袋!捉贼!捉贼!

勃拉班修自上方窗口上。

勃拉班修大惊小怪地叫什么呀?出了什么事?

罗德利哥先生,您家里的人没有缺少吗?

伊阿古您的门都锁上了吗?

勃拉班修咦,你们为什么这样问我?

伊阿古哼!先生,有人偷了您的东西去啦,还不赶快披上您的袍子!您的心碎了,您的灵魂已经丢掉半个;就在这时候,就在这一刻工夫,一头老黑羊在跟您的白母羊交尾哩。起来,起来!打钟惊醒那些鼾睡的市民,否则魔鬼要让您抱外孙啦。喂,起来!

勃拉班修什么!你发疯了吗?

罗德利哥最可敬的老先生,您听得出我的声音吗?

勃拉班修我听不出;你是谁?

罗德利哥我的名字是罗德利哥。

勃拉班修讨厌!我叫你不要在我的门前走动;我已经老老实实、明明白白对你说,我的女儿是不能嫁给你的;现在你吃饱了饭,喝醉了酒,疯疯癫癫,不怀好意,又要来扰乱我的安静了。

罗德利哥先生,先生,先生!

勃拉班修可是你必须明白,我不是一个好说话的人,要是你惹我发火,凭着我的地位,只要略微拿出一点力量来,你就要叫苦不迭了。

罗德利哥好先生,不要生气。

勃拉班修说什么有贼没有贼?这儿是威尼斯;我的屋子不是一座独家的田庄。

罗德利哥最尊严的勃拉班修,我是一片诚心来通知您。

伊阿古嘿,先生,您也是那种因为魔鬼叫他敬奉上帝而把上帝丢在一旁的人。您把我们当作了坏人,所以把我们的好心看成了恶意,宁愿让您的女儿给一头黑马骑了,替您生下一些马子马孙,攀一些马亲马眷。

勃拉班修你是个什么混账东西,敢这样胡说八道?

伊阿古先生,我是一个特意来告诉您一个消息的人,您的令嫒现在正在跟那摩尔人干那件禽兽一样的勾当哩。

勃拉班修你是个混蛋!

伊阿古您是一位——元老呢。

勃拉班修你留点儿神吧;罗德利哥,我认识你。

罗德利哥先生,我愿意负一切责任;可是请您允许我说一句话。要是令嫒因为得到您的明智的同意,所以才会在这样更深人静的午夜,身边并没有一个人保护,让一个下贱的谁都可以雇用的船夫,把她载到一个贪淫的摩尔人的粗野的怀抱里——要是您对于这件事情不但知道,而且默许——照我看来,您至少已经给了她一部分的同意——那么我们的确太放肆、太冒昧了;可是假如您果真不知道这件事,那么从礼貌上说起来,您可不应该对我们恶声相向。难道我会这样一点不懂规矩,敢来戏侮像您这样一位年尊的长者吗?我再说一句,要是令嫒没有得到您的许可,就把她的责任、美貌、智慧和财产,全部委弃在一个到处为家、漂泊流浪的异邦人的身上,那么她的确已经干下了一件重大的逆行了。您可以立刻去调查一个明白,要是她好好地在她的房间里或是在您的宅子里,那么是我欺骗了您,您可以按照国法惩办我。

勃拉班修喂,点起火来!给我一支蜡烛!把我的仆人全都叫起来!这件事情很像我的恶梦,它的极大的可能性已经重压在我的心头了。喂,拿火来!拿火来!(自上方下。)

伊阿古再会,我要少陪了;要是我不去,我就要出面跟这摩尔人作对证,那不但不大相宜,而且在我的地位上也很多不便;因为我知道无论他将要因此而受到什么谴责,政府方面现在还不能就把他免职;塞浦路斯的战事正在进行,情势那么紧急,要不是马上派他前去,他们休想战到第二个人有像他那样的才能,可以担当这一个重任。所以虽然我恨他像恨地狱里的刑罚一样,可是为了事实上的必要,我不得不和他假意周旋,那也不过是表面上的敷衍而已。你等他们出来找人的时候,只要领他们到马人旅馆去,一定可以找到他;我也在那边跟他在一起。再见。(下。)

勃拉班修率众仆持火炬自下方上。

勃拉班修真有这样的祸事!她去了;只有悲哀怨恨伴着我这衰朽的余年!罗德利哥,你在什么地方看见她的?——啊,不幸的孩子!——你说跟那摩尔人在一起吗?——谁还愿意做一个父亲!——你怎么知道是她?——唉,想不到她会这样欺骗我!——她对你怎么说?——再拿些蜡烛来!唤醒我的所有的亲族!——你想他们有没有结婚?

罗德利哥说老实话,我想他们已经结了婚啦。

勃拉班修天哪!她怎么出去的?啊,骨肉的叛逆!做父亲的人啊,从此以后,你们千万留心你们女儿的行动,不要信任她们的心思。世上有没有一种引诱青年少女失去贞操的邪术?罗德利哥,你有没有在书上读到过这一类的事情?

罗德利哥是的,先生,我的确读到过。

勃拉班修叫起我的兄弟来!唉,我后悔不让你娶了她去!你们快去给我分头找寻!你知道我们可以在什么地方把她和那摩尔人一起捉到?

罗德利哥我想我可以找到他的踪迹,要是您愿意多派几个得力的人手跟我前去。

勃拉修请你带路。我要到每一个人家去搜寻;大部分的人家都在我的势力之下。喂,多带一些武器!叫起几个巡夜的警吏!去,好罗德利哥,我一定重谢你的辛苦。(同下。)