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When Dorothy was left alone she began to feel hungry. So she went to the cupboard and cut herself some bread, which she spread with butter. She gave some to Toto, and taking a pail from the shelf she carried it down to the little brook and filled it with clear, sparkling water. Toto ran over to the trees and began to bark at the birds sitting there. Dorothy went to get him, and saw such delicious fruit hanging from the branches that she gathered some of it, finding it just what she wanted to help out her breakfast.

Then she went back to the house, and having helped herself and Toto to a good drink of the cool, clear water, she set about making ready for the journey to the City of Emeralds.

Dorothy had only one other dress, but that happened to be clean and was hanging on a peg beside her bed. It was gingham, with checks of white and blue; and although the blue was somewhat faded with many washings, it was still a pretty frock. The girl washed herself carefully, dressed herself in the clean gingham, and tied her pink sunbonnet on her head. She took a little basket and filled it with bread from the cupboard, laying a white cloth over the top. Then she looked down at her feet and noticed how old and worn her shoes were.

"They surely will never do for a long journey, Toto," she said. And Toto looked up into her face with his little black eyes and wagged his tail to show he knew what she meant.

At that moment Dorothy saw lying on the table the silver shoes that had belonged to the Witch of the East.

"I wonder if they will fit me," she said to Toto. "They would be just the thing to take a long walk in, for they could not wear out."

She took off her old leather shoes and tried on the silver ones, which fitted her as well as if they had been made for her.

Finally she picked up her basket.

"Come along, Toto," she said. "We will go to the Emerald City and ask the Great Oz how to get back to Kansas again."

She closed the door, locked it, and put the key carefully in the pocket of her dress. And so, with Toto trotting along soberly behind her, she started on her journey.

There were several roads nearby, but it did not take her long to find the one paved with yellow bricks. Within a short time she was walking briskly toward the Emerald City, her silver shoes tinkling merrily on the hard, yellow road-bed. The sun shone bright and the birds sang sweetly, and Dorothy did not feel nearly so bad as you might think a little girl would who had been suddenly whisked away from her own country and set down in the midst of a strange land.

She was surprised, as she walked along, to see how pretty the country was about her. There were neat fences at the sides of the road, painted a dainty blue color, and beyond them were fields of grain and vegetables in abundance. Evidently the Munchkins were good farmers and able to raise large crops. Once in a while she would pass a house, and the people came out to look at her and bow low as she went by; for everyone knew she had been the means of destroying the Wicked Witch and setting them free from bondage. The houses of the Munchkins were odd-looking dwellings, for each was round, with a big dome for a roof. All were painted blue, for in this country of the East blue was the favorite color.

Toward evening, when Dorothy was tired with her long walk and began to wonder where she should pass the night, she came to a house rather larger than the rest. On the green lawn before it many men and women were dancing. Five little fiddlers played as loudly as possible, and the people were laughing and singing, while a big table near by was loaded with delicious fruits and nuts, pies and cakes, and many other good things to eat.

The people greeted Dorothy kindly, and invited her to supper and to pass the night with them; for this was the home of one of the richest Munchkins in the land, and his friends were gathered with him to celebrate their freedom from the bondage of the Wicked Witch.

Dorothy ate a hearty supper and was waited upon by the rich Munchkin himself, whose name was Boq. Then she sat upon a settee and watched the people dance.

When Boq saw her silver shoes he said, "You must be a great sorceress."

"Why?" asked the girl.

"Because you wear silver shoes and have killed the Wicked Witch. Besides, you have white in your frock, and only witches and sorceresses wear white."

"My dress is blue and white checked," said Dorothy, smoothing out the wrinkles in it.

"It is kind of you to wear that," said Boq. "Blue is the color of the Munchkins, and white is the witch color. So we know you are a friendly witch."

Dorothy did not know what to say to this, for all the people seemed to think her a witch, and she knew very well she was only an ordinary little girl who had come by the chance of a cyclone into a strange land.

When she had tired watching the dancing, Boq led her into the house, where he gave her a room with a pretty bed in it. The sheets were made of blue cloth, and Dorothy slept soundly in them till morning, with Toto curled up on the blue rug beside her.

She ate a hearty breakfast, and watched a wee Munchkin baby, who played with Toto and pulled his tail and crowed and laughed in a way that greatly amused Dorothy. Toto was a fine curiosity to all the people, for they had never seen a dog before.

"How far is it to the Emerald City?" the girl asked.

"I do not know," answered Boq gravely, "for I have never been there. It is better for people to keep away from Oz, unless they have business with him. But it is a long way to the Emerald City, and it will take you many days. The country here is rich and pleasant, but you must pass through rough and dangerous places before you reach the end of your journey."

This worried Dorothy a little, but she knew that only the Great Oz could help her get to Kansas again, so she bravely resolved not to turn back.

She bade her friends good-bye, and again started along the road of yellow brick. When she had gone several miles she thought she would stop to rest, and so climbed to the top of the fence beside the road and sat down. There was a great cornfield beyond the fence, and not far away she saw a Scarecrow, placed high on a pole to keep the birds from the ripe corn.

Dorothy leaned her chin upon her hand and gazed thoughtfully at the Scarecrow. Its head was a small sack stuffed with straw, with eyes, nose, and mouth painted on it to represent a face. An old, pointed blue hat, that had belonged to some Munchkin, was perched on his head, and the rest of the figure was a blue suit of clothes, worn and faded, which had also been stuffed with straw. On the feet were some old boots with blue tops, such as every man wore in this country, and the figure was raised above the stalks of corn by means of the pole stuck up its back.

While Dorothy was looking earnestly into the queer, painted face of the Scarecrow, she was surprised to see one of the eyes slowly wink at her. She thought she must have been mistaken at first, for none of the scarecrows in Kansas ever wink; but presently the figure nodded its head to her in a friendly way. Then she climbed down from the fence and walked up to it, while Toto ran around the pole and barked.

"Good day," said the Scarecrow, in a rather husky voice.

"Did you speak?" asked the girl, in wonder.

"Certainly," answered the Scarecrow. "How do you do?"

"I'm pretty well, thank you," replied Dorothy politely. "How do you do?"

"I'm not feeling well," said the Scarecrow, with a smile, "for it is very tedious being perched up here night and day to scare away crows."

"Can't you get down?" asked Dorothy.

"No, for this pole is stuck up my back. If you will please take away the pole I shall be greatly obliged to you."

Dorothy reached up both arms and lifted the figure off the pole, for, being stuffed with straw, it was quite light.

"Thank you very much," said the Scarecrow, when he had been set down on the ground. "I feel like a new man."

Dorothy was puzzled at this, for it sounded queer to hear a stuffed man speak, and to see him bow and walk along beside her.

"Who are you?" asked the Scarecrow when he had stretched himself and yawned. "And where are you going?"

"My name is Dorothy," said the girl, "and I am going to the Emerald City, to ask the Great Oz to send me back to Kansas."

"Where is the Emerald City?" he inquired. "And who is Oz?"

"Why, don't you know?" she returned, in surprise.

"No, indeed. I don't know anything. You see, I am stuffed, so I have no brains at all," he answered sadly.

"Oh," said Dorothy, "I'm awfully sorry for you."

"Do you think," he asked, "if I go to the Emerald City with you, that Oz would give me some brains?"

"I cannot tell," she returned, "but you may come with me, if you like. If Oz will not give you any brains you will be no worse off than you are now."

"That is true," said the Scarecrow. "You see," he continued confidentially, "I don't mind my legs and arms and body being stuffed, because I cannot get hurt. If anyone treads on my toes or sticks a pin into me, it doesn't matter, for I can't feel it. But I do not want people to call me a fool, and if my head stays stuffed with straw instead of with brains, as yours is, how am I ever to know anything?"

"I understand how you feel," said the little girl, who was truly sorry for him. "If you will come with me I'll ask Oz to do all he can for you."

"Thank you," he answered gratefully.

They walked back to the road. Dorothy helped him over the fence, and they started along the path of yellow brick for the Emerald City.

Toto did not like this addition to the party at first. He smelled around the stuffed man as if he suspected there might be a nest of rats in the straw, and he often growled in an unfriendly way at the Scarecrow.

"Don't mind Toto," said Dorothy to her new friend. "He never bites."

"Oh, I'm not afraid," replied the Scarecrow. "He can't hurt the straw. Do let me carry that basket for you. I shall not mind it, for I can't get tired. I'll tell you a secret," he continued, as he walked along. "There is only one thing in the world I am afraid of."

"What is that?" asked Dorothy; "the Munchkin farmer who made you?"

"No," answered the Scarecrow; "it's a lighted match."

多萝茜只剩独个儿了,她觉得饥饿,所以走到橱房去,切下几片面包,涂上了牛油。她分一些给托托吃。她从架子上拿下一只木桶,到小河里去汲满了清得发亮的水。托托跑到树林里去,向那些蹲在树上的鸟儿们吠着。多萝茜跑过去捉托托,却看见了美好的果子,挂在枝头上,她摘下了一些,正好当作早餐。

于是她回到屋子里,和托托喝了些清冷的水,预备动身到翡翠城去了。

多萝茜还有一件衣服,恰巧洗干净了,挂在床旁边的木钉上面,那是格子布的,白色和蓝色的棋盘格;虽然洗过好儿次,那蓝色有几分褪了,但仍旧是一件漂亮的罩衫。小女孩子用心地洗了脸,穿上了这件干净的格子布罩衫,把淡红色的遮日帽,缚在头上,提着一只小篮子,放满了从橱里拿出来的面包,上面盖了一方白布。随后她低头去看看自己的脚,看到穿的是一双多么旧的鞋子。

她说:“托托,旧鞋子一定不能够走长路的。”托托抬起头来,用它一双小黑眼睛,望着她的脸,摇动着它的尾巴,表示它知道她说的是什么意思。

在这时候,多萝茜看见放在桌子上的一双银鞋子,那是东方女巫的东西。

她对托托说:“我要知道,如果它们适合我穿的话,我要走长路正是用得着,因为这种鞋子不容易穿破。”于是她脱下旧皮鞋,穿上那双银的,不大不小好像是为了她做的一般。

最后她提起了她的篮子。

她说:“托托,走吧,我们将要到翡翠城去,请求伟大的奥芝,指点我们怎么样再回到堪萨斯州去。”

她关上了门,加上了锁,把钥匙很小心地放进衣袋里。这样,她动身赶路了,托托安静地跟在她的背后快跑。

靠近这个地方,有好几条路,不久她找到一条用黄砖铺砌的路。她立刻活泼地向翡翠城走去,她的银鞋走在硬的黄色的路面上,叮当地发出好听的声音。太阳照得亮亮地,鸟儿唱得很好听,多萝茜似乎并不像你们所想像的,一个小女孩子,突然从她自己的故乡,被吹落在一个陌生的地方,那样地感到不幸。

当她向前走过去时,她很惊奇地看见四周都是十分美丽的地方。路旁边有整齐的短墙,漆着文雅的蓝色,隔墙满是谷类和蔬菜的田地,很明显,芒奇金人都是好农民,能够得到丰收。有时候,她经过一所屋子,大家跑出来看她,当她走过去时,他们低低地向她鞠着躬,因为每一个人都知道她就是杀死恶女巫的那个人,她把他们从奴隶中解放出来。芒奇金人的屋子,都是样式奇怪的建筑物,每一幢是圆的,盖着一个大的圆屋顶,完全漆着蓝色,因为在这东方的国度里,蓝色是大家喜爱的色彩。

将近黄昏了,多萝茜走了长长的路,已经疲倦了,才急于要知道她应当在什么地方过夜,她跑到一所比其余的大一点儿的屋子。在前面的绿草地上,有许多男人和女人在跳舞。五个小提琴手,尽力地拉得响,大家笑着,唱着,这时,近旁边的一张大桌子上,摆着精美的果子和硬壳果,包子和糕饼,还有其他好多好吃的东西。

大家十分和蔼可亲地欢迎着多萝茜,请她吃晚饭,请她在他们这里过夜;因为这是芒奇金地方最富有的一家,还邀集了他的朋友们,一同庆祝他们从恶女巫的奴役下获得自由。

多萝茜吃了一顿丰美的晚餐,有个芒奇金人叫做波奎的,亲自招待着。她坐在一只有靠背的长椅上,看大家跳舞。

当波奎看见了她的一双银鞋子,他便说道:“你想来定是个大魔术师吧!”

小女孩子问:“为什么?”

“因为你穿着一双银鞋子,并且杀死了恶女巫。而且,你穿的白色的袍子,只有女巫和魔术师都是穿着白的。”

“我的衣裳上面是蓝色和白色的格子,”多萝茜一边说着,一边在压平衣服上的皱纹。

波奎说:“你穿着那种衣服是表示好意的,蓝色是芒奇金人的颜色,白色是女巫的颜色;所以我们知道你是一个友好的女巫。”

多萝茜对于这一点,不知道说些什么才好,因为所有的人,似乎都把她当做一个女巫,她很明白,她只不过是一个平常的小女孩子,因为一阵旋风的机会,才降到这一奇怪的地方上来。

当她看跳舞看得倦了时,波奎领她走进屋子里去,在那里他给她一间房间,里面有一张美丽的床,被单是蓝的布做的,多萝茜就躺在这上面,一直酣睡到早晨,托托慰伏在她旁边的蓝色的地毯上。

她吃了一顿丰美的早餐,注视着一个极小的芒奇金婴儿,他和托托在一块儿玩耍,拖拉它的尾巴,欢呼着,叫笑着,这样子使得多萝茜大大地高兴起来。托托在这儿所有的人的眼里,是一个美妙的奇异的东西,因为他们在以前从来没有看见过狗。

小女孩子问:“到那翡翠城去有多远?”

“我可不知道,”波奎庄重地回答说,“因为我从来没有到过那里。除非大家有什么事务和来往,还是不到奥芝的地方去好。你到翡翠城去的路程是长长的,要花费许多日子。在我们这个地方是富有的,并且快乐的,但是在你到达旅程的目的地以前,你必得经过不平坦和危险的地方。”

这使得多萝茜有点儿发愁,但是她知道,只有那伟大的奥芝,才能够帮助她再回到堪萨斯州去,所以她决定不折回去,要勇敢地向前进。

她向她的朋友们说着再会,沿着黄砖铺砌的路又动身了。她赶了好儿里路,想停下来休息,就爬到路旁边短墙的顶上坐下来。隔墙是一大块稻田,离开得不远处,她看见有一个稻草人,高挂在竹竿上,看管着鸦雀,不让它们飞近长得成熟的稻子。

多萝茜把下望靠在手上,呆想地凝视着稻草人。他的头是一口小布袋,塞满了稻草,上面画着眼睛、鼻子和嘴巴,装成了一个脸儿。戴在头上的是一顶像芒奇金人样式的破旧的、蓝色的尖顶帽子,身上穿的是一件蓝色的衣服,已经褪了色了,身体里面也是塞满了稻草。套在脚上的是一双蓝布面的旧鞋子。在这个地方,好像每一个人都是这样装束的。用一根竹竿截入他的背部,这家伙就被高高吊起在稻田上面了。

正当多萝茜认真地注视那稻草人的脸儿上画着奇特的色彩时,她吃惊地看见他一只眼睛徐徐地向她眨着。起初,她想她一定弄错了,因为在堪萨斯州的稻草人,没有一个是眨眼的;但是现在这个家伙,却又在友好地向她点点头。于是她从短墙上爬下来,走到她那里去,这时候托托在竹竿的四周跑着,吠着。

“好哇,”稻草人说,声音有几分嘶嘎。

小女孩奇怪地问道:“是你在讲话吗?”

“当然,”稻草人回答说:“你好哇?”

“谢谢你,我很好,”多萝茜很有礼貌地回答说:“你好吗?”

“我觉得不舒服,”稻草人微笑着说,“因为整天整夜地被吊在这里,吓走乌鸦们,是一件十分讨厌的事情。”

多萝茜问:“你能够下来吗?”

“不能,因为竹竿儿插在我的背里。如果你替我抽掉它,我将大大地感谢你了。”

多萝茜伸出两只手臂,把他举起来离开了竹竿,因为里面塞的是稻草,是十分轻的。

当稻草人坐下在地面时,他说:“多谢你,我觉得像一个新生的人了。”

听一个稻草人说话,看他鞠躬,还靠着自己的力量在旁边走动,实在是一件奇怪的事,多萝茜觉得十分惊异。

当稻草人伸展着他的肢体,并且打了儿个呵欠以后,他问:“你是谁?你到哪里去?”

“我的名字叫做多萝茜,”小女孩子说,“我上翡翠城去,请求伟大的奥芝,送我回到堪萨斯州的家里。”

他又问道:“翡翠城在哪里?奥芝是谁?”

“什么,你也不知道吗?”她吃惊地回答他。

“不,真正的,我什么也不知道。你知道,我是用稻草填寒的,所以我没有脑子。”他悲伤地回答。

“唉,”多萝茜说,“我很抱歉。”

他再问:“你以为,如果我和你一同到菊翠城去,那奥芝会给我一个脑子吗?”

“我不能说,”她回答道,“如果你喜欢,可以和我一块儿去。即使奥芝不给你脑子,你也不会比现在的情形更坏。”

“那倒是真的,”稻草人说,“你知道,”他表示信任她,继续说着:“我不在乎一双腿,一双手,以及臂和身体,它们都是用稻草填塞的,因此我不会受伤。如果不论谁践踏我的脚趾,或者拿针刺着我的身体,那也不打紧,因为我不会觉得痛的。但是我不愿意大家叫我是一个蠢货,如果我的脑壳里放进脑子,代替填塞着的稻草,像你一样,我就能常常知道不论什么事情了!”

“我明白你的感触,”小女孩子说,她真的替他担忧,“如果你和我一块儿去,我将请求奥芝尽力帮助你。”

“谢谢你!”他感激地回答。

他们走回到路上去,多萝茜帮助他翻过了短墙,随后,他们沿着到翡翠城去的黄砖铺砌的路出发。

起初,托托不喜欢这个意外的东西参加进来。它四处嗅着这个稻草人,仿佛疑心在稻草里也许有一巢老鼠,常常有一点儿不友好地对着稻草人狺狺地吠着。

“不要害怕托托,”多萝答对她的新朋友说,“它不会咬你的。”

“唔,我不怕的,”稻草人回答说,“它不能够咬伤稻草。来,让我替你提着那只篮子。我不在乎,因为我不会疲倦。我告诉你一个秘密,”他一边向前走,一边继续着说:“在这个世界上,只有一件东西使我害怕。”

“那是什么东西?”多萝茜问,“可是那个制造你的芒奇金的农民吗?”

“不,”稻草人回答说,“是一根燃烧着的火柴。”