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A few days later, when the terror caused by the executions had died down, some of the animals remembered--or thought they remembered--that the Sixth Commandment decreed "No animal shall kill any other animal." And though no one cared to mention it in the hearing of the pigs or the dogs, it was felt that the killings which had taken place did not square with this. Clover asked Benjamin to read her the Sixth Commandment, and when Benjamin, as usual, said that he refused to meddle in such matters, she fetched Muriel. Muriel read the Commandment for her. It ran: "No animal shall kill any other animal WITHOUT CAUSE." Somehow or other, the last two words had slipped out of the animals' memory. But they saw now that the Commandment had not been violated; for clearly there was good reason for killing the traitors who had leagued themselves with Snowball.

Throughout the year the animals worked even harder than they had worked in the previous year. To rebuild the windmill, with walls twice as thick as before, and to finish it by the appointed date, together with the regular work of the farm, was a tremendous labour. There were times when it seemed to the animals that they worked longer hours and fed no better than they had done in Jones's day. On Sunday mornings Squealer, holding down a long strip of paper with his trotter, would read out to them lists of figures proving that the production of every class of foodstuff had increased by two hundred per cent, three hundred per cent, or five hundred per cent, as the case might be. The animals saw no reason to disbelieve him, especially as they could no longer remember very clearly what conditions had been like before the Rebellion. All the same, there were days when they felt that they would sooner have had less figures and more food.

All orders were now issued through Squealer or one of the other pigs. Napoleon himself was not seen in public as often as once in a fortnight. When he did appear, he was attended not only by his retinue of dogs but by a black cockerel who marched in front of him and acted as a kind of trumpeter, letting out a loud "cock-a-doodle-doo" before Napoleon spoke. Even in the farmhouse, it was said, Napoleon inhabited separate apartments from the others. He took his meals alone, with two dogs to wait upon him, and always ate from the Crown Derby dinner service which had been in the glass cupboard in the drawing-room. It was also announced that the gun would be fired every year on Napoleon's birthday, as well as on the other two anniversaries.

Napoleon was now never spoken of simply as "Napoleon." He was always referred to in formal style as "our Leader, Comrade Napoleon," and this pigs liked to invent for him such titles as Father of All Animals, Terror of Mankind, Protector of the Sheep-fold, Ducklings' Friend, and the like. In his speeches, Squealer would talk with the tears rolling down his cheeks of Napoleon's wisdom the goodness of his heart, and the deep love he bore to all animals everywhere, even and especially the unhappy animals who still lived in ignorance and slavery on other farms. It had become usual to give Napoleon the credit for every successful achievement and every stroke of good fortune. You would often hear one hen remark to another, "Under the guidance of our Leader, Comrade Napoleon, I have laid five eggs in six days"; or two cows, enjoying a drink at the pool, would exclaim, "Thanks to the leadership of Comrade Napoleon, how excellent this water tastes!" The general feeling on the farm was well expressed in a poem entitled Comrade Napoleon, which was composed by Minimus and which ran as follows:

Friend of fatherless!

Fountain of happiness!

Lord of the swill-bucket! Oh, how my soul is on

Fire when I gaze at thy

Calm and commanding eye,

Like the sun in the sky,

Comrade Napoleon!

Thou are the giver of

All that thy creatures love,

Full belly twice a day, clean straw to roll upon;

Every beast great or small

Sleeps at peace in his stall,

Thou watchest over all,

Comrade Napoleon!

Had I a sucking-pig,

Ere he had grown as big

Even as a pint bottle or as a rolling-pin,

He should have learned to be

Faithful and true to thee,

Yes, his first squeak should be

"Comrade Napoleon!"

Napoleon approved of this poem and caused it to be inscribed on the wall of the big barn, at the opposite end from the Seven Commandments. It was surmounted by a portrait of Napoleon, in profile, executed by Squealer in white paint.

Meanwhile, through the agency of Whymper, Napoleon was engaged in complicated negotiations with Frederick and Pilkington. The pile of timber was still unsold. Of the two, Frederick was the more anxious to get hold of it, but he would not offer a reasonable price. At the same time there were renewed rumours that Frederick and his men were plotting to attack Animal Farm and to destroy the windmill, the building of which had aroused furious jealousy in him. Snowball was known to be still skulking on Pinchfield Farm. In the middle of the summer the animals were alarmed to hear that three hens had come forward and confessed that, inspired by Snowball, they had entered into a plot to murder Napoleon. They were executed immediately, and fresh precautions for Napoleon's safety were taken. Four dogs guarded his bed at night, one at each corner, and a young pig named Pinkeye was given the task of tasting all his food before he ate it, lest it should be poisoned.

At about the same time it was given out that Napoleon had arranged to sell the pile of timber to Mr. Pilkington; he was also going to enter into a regular agreement for the exchange of certain products between Animal Farm and Foxwood. The relations between Napoleon and Pilkington, though they

were only conducted through Whymper, were now almost friendly. The animals distrusted Pilkington, as a human being, but greatly preferred him to Frederick, whom they both feared and hated. As the summer wore on, and the windmill neared completion, the rumours of an impending treacherous attack grew stronger and stronger. Frederick, it was said, intended to bring against them twenty men all armed with guns, and he had already bribed the magistrates and police, so that if he could once get hold of the title-deeds of Animal Farm they would ask no questions. Moreover, terrible stories were leaking out from Pinchfield about the cruelties that Frederick practised upon his animals. He had flogged an old horse to death, he starved his cows, he had killed a dog by throwing it into the furnace, he amused himself in the evenings by making cocks fight with splinters of razor-blade tied to their spurs. The animals' blood boiled with rage when they heard of these things beingdone to their comrades, and sometimes they clamoured to be allowed to go out in a body and attack Pinchfield Farm, drive out the humans, and set the animals free. But Squealer counselled them to avoid rash actions and trust in Comrade Napoleon's strategy.

Nevertheless, feeling against Frederick continued to run high. One Sunday morning Napoleon appeared in the barn and explained that he had never at any time contemplated selling the pile of timber to Frederick; he considered it beneath his dignity, he said, to have dealings with scoundrels of that description. The pigeons who were still sent out to spread tidings of the Rebellion were forbidden to set foot anywhere on Foxwood, and were also ordered to drop their former slogan of "Death to Humanity" in favour of "Death to Frederick." In the late summer yet another of Snowball's machinations was laid bare. The wheat crop was full of weeds, and it was discovered that on one of his nocturnal visits Snowball had mixed weed seeds with the seed corn. A gander who had been privy to the plot had confessed his guilt to Squealer and immediately committed suicide by swallowing deadly nightshade berries. The animals now also learned that Snowball had never--as many of them had believed hitherto--received the order of "Animal Hero, First Class." This was merely a legend which had been spread some time after the Battle of the Cowshed by Snowball himself. So far from being decorated, he had been censured for showing cowardice in the battle. Once again some of the animals heard this with a certain bewilderment, but Squealer was soon able to convince them that their memories had been at fault.

In the autumn, by a tremendous, exhausting effort--for the harvest had to be gathered at almost the same time--the windmill was finished. The machinery had still to be installed, and Whymper was negotiating the purchase of it, but the structure was completed. In the teeth of every difficulty, in spite of inexperience, of primitive implements, of bad luck and of Snowball's treachery, the work had been finished punctually to the very day! Tired out but proud, the animals walked round and round their masterpiece, which appeared even more beautiful in their eyes than when it had been built the first time. Moreover, the walls were twice as thick as before. Nothing short of explosives would lay them low this time! And when they thought of how they had laboured, what discouragements they had overcome, and the enormous difference that would be made in their lives when the sails were turning and the dynamos running--when they thought of all this, their tiredness forsook them and they gambolled round and round the windmill, uttering cries of triumph. Napoleon himself, attended by his dogs and his cockerel, came down to inspect the completed work; he personally congratulated the animals on their achievement, and announced that the mill would be named Napoleon Mill.

Two days later the animals were called together for a special meeting in the barn. They were struck dumb with surprise when Napoleon announced that he had sold the pile of timber to Frederick. Tomorrow Frederick's wagons would arrive and begin carting it away. Throughout the whole period of his seeming friendship with Pilkington, Napoleon had really been in secret agreement with Frederick.

All relations with Foxwood had been broken off; insulting messages had been sent to Pilkington. The pigeons had been told to avoid Pinchfield Farm and to alter their slogan from "Death to Frederick" to "Death to Pilkington." At the same time Napoleon assured the animals that the stories of an impending attack on Animal Farm were completely untrue, and that the tales about Frederick's cruelty to his own animals had been greatly exaggerated. All these rumours had probably originated with Snowball and his agents. It now appeared that Snowball was not, after all, hiding on Pinchfield Farm, and in fact had never been there in his life: he was living--in considerable luxury, so it was said--at Foxwood, and had in reality been a pensioner of Pilkington for years past.

The pigs were in ecstasies over Napoleon's cunning. By seeming to be friendly with Pilkington he had forced Frederick to raise his price by twelve pounds. But the superior quality of Napoleon's mind, said Squealer, was shown in the fact that he trusted nobody, not even Frederick. Frederick had wanted to pay for the timber with something called a cheque, which, it seemed, was a piece of paper with a promise to pay written upon it. But Napoleon was too clever for him. He had demanded payment in real five-pound notes, which were to be handed over before the timber was removed. Already Frederick had paid up; and the sum he had paid was just enough to buy the machinery for the windmill.

Meanwhile the timber was being carted away at high speed. When it was all gone, another special meeting was held in the barn for the animals to inspect Frederick's bank-notes. Smiling beatifically, and wearing both his decorations, Napoleon reposed on a bed of straw on the platform, with the money at his side, neatly piled on a china dish from the farmhouse kitchen. The animals filed slowly past, and each gazed his fill. And Boxer put out his nose to sniff at the bank-notes, and the flimsy white things stirred and rustled in his breath.

Three days later there was a terrible hullabaloo. Whymper, his face deadly pale, came racing up the path on his bicycle, flung it down in the yard and rushed straight into the farmhouse. The next moment a choking roar of rage sounded from Napoleon's apartments. The news of what had happened sped round the farm like wildfire. The banknotes were forgeries! Frederick had got the timber for nothing!

Napoleon called the animals together immediately and in a terrible voice pronounced the death sentence upon Frederick. When captured, he said, Frederick should be boiled alive. At the same time he warned them that after this treacherous deed the worst was to be expected. Frederick and his men might make their long-expected attack at any moment. Sentinels were placed at all the approaches to the farm. In addition, four pigeons were sent to Foxwood with a conciliatory message, which it was hoped might re-establish good relations with Pilkington.

The very next morning the attack came. The animals were at breakfast when the look-outs came racing in with the news that Frederick and his followers had already come through the five-barred gate. Boldly enough the animals sallied forth to meet them, but this time they did not have the easy victory that they had had in the Battle of the Cowshed. There were fifteen men, with half a dozen guns between them, and they opened fire as soon as they got within fifty yards. The animals could not face the terrible explosions and the stinging pellets, and in spite of the efforts of Napoleon and Boxer to rally them, they were soon driven back. A number of them were already wounded. They took refuge in the farm buildings and peeped cautiously out from chinks and knot-holes. The whole of the big pasture, including the windmill, was in the hands of the enemy. For the moment even Napoleon seemed at a loss. He paced up and down without a word, his tail rigid and twitching. Wistful glances were sent in the direction of Foxwood. If Pilkington and his men would help them, the day might yet be won. But at this moment the four pigeons, who had been sent out on the day before, returned, one of them bearing a scrap of paper from Pilkington. On it was pencilled the words: "Serves you right."

Meanwhile Frederick and his men had halted about the windmill. The animals watched them, and a murmur of dismay went round. Two of the men had produced a crowbar and a sledge hammer. They were going to knock the windmill down.

"Impossible!" cried Napoleon. "We have built the walls far too thick for that. They could not knock it down in a week. Courage, comrades!"

But Benjamin was watching the movements of the men intently. The two with the hammer and the crowbar were drilling a hole near the base of the windmill. Slowly, and with an air almost of amusement, Benjamin nodded his long muzzle.

"I thought so," he said. "Do you not see what they are doing? In another moment they are going to pack blasting powder into that hole."

Terrified, the animals waited. It was impossible now to venture out of the shelter of the buildings. After a few minutes the men were seen to be running in all directions. Then there was a deafening roar. The pigeons swirled into the air, and all the animals, except Napoleon, flung themselves flat on their bellies and hid their faces. When they got up again, a huge cloud of black smoke was hanging where the windmill had been. Slowly the breeze drifted it away. The windmill had ceased to exist!

At this sight the animals' courage returned to them. The fear and despair they had felt a moment earlier were drowned in their rage against this vile, contemptible act. A mighty cry for vengeance went up, and without waiting for further orders they charged forth in a body and made straight for the enemy. This time they did not heed the cruel pellets that swept over them like hail. It was a savage, bitter battle. The men fired again and again, and, when the animals got to close quarters, lashed out with their sticks and their heavy boots. A cow, three sheep, and two geese were killed, and nearly everyone was wounded. Even Napoleon, who was directing operations from the rear, had the tip of his tail chipped by a pellet. But the men did not go unscathed either. Three of them had their heads broken by blows from Boxer's hoofs; another was gored in the belly by a cow's horn; another had his trousers nearly torn off by Jessie and Bluebell. And when the nine dogs of Napoleon's own bodyguard, whom he had instructed to make a detour under cover of the hedge, suddenly appeared on the men's flank, baying ferociously, panic overtook them. They saw that they were in danger of being surrounded. Frederick shouted to his men to get out while the going was good, and the next moment the cowardly enemy was running for dear life. The animals chased them right down to the bottom of the field, and got in some last kicks at them as they forced their way through the thorn hedge.

They had won, but they were weary and bleeding. Slowly they began to limp back towards the farm. The sight of their dead comrades stretched upon the grass moved some of them to tears. And for a little while they halted in sorrowful silence at the place where the windmill had once stood. Yes, it was gone; almost the last trace of their labour was gone! Even the foundations were partially destroyed. And in rebuilding it they could not this time, as before, make use of the fallen stones. This time the stones had vanished too. The force of the explosion had flung them to distances of hundreds of yards. It was as though the windmill had never been.

As they approached the farm Squealer, who had unaccountably been absent during the fighting, came skipping towards them, whisking his tail and beaming with satisfaction. And the animals heard, from the direction of the farm buildings, the solemn booming of a gun.

"What is that gun firing for?" said Boxer.

"To celebrate our victory!" cried Squealer.

"What victory?" said Boxer. His knees were bleeding, he had lost a shoe and split his hoof, and a dozen pellets had lodged themselves in his hind leg.

"What victory, comrade? Have we not driven the enemy off our soil--the sacred soil of Animal Farm?"

"But they have destroyed the windmill. And we had worked on it for two years!"

"What matter? We will build another windmill. We will build six windmills if we feel like it. You do not appreciate, comrade, the mighty thing that we have done. The enemy was in occupation of this very ground that we stand upon. And now--thanks to the leadership of Comrade Napoleon--we have won every inch of it back again!"

"Then we have won back what we had before," said Boxer.

"That is our victory," said Squealer.

They limped into the yard. The pellets under the skin of Boxer's leg smarted painfully. He saw ahead of him the heavy labour of rebuilding the windmill from the foundations, and already in imagination he braced himself for the task. But for the first time it occurred to him that he was eleven years old and that perhaps his great muscles were not quite what they had once been.

But when the animals saw the green flag flying, and heard the gun firing again--seven times it was fired in all--and heard the speech that Napoleon made, congratulating them on their conduct, it did seem to them after all that they had won a great victory. The animals slain in the battle were given a solemn funeral. Boxer and Clover pulled the wagon which served as a hearse, and Napoleon himself walked at the head of the procession. Two whole days were given over to celebrations. There were songs, speeches, and more firing of the gun, and a special gift of an apple was bestowed on every animal, with two ounces of corn for each bird and three biscuits for each dog. It was announced that the battle would be called the Battle of the Windmill, and that Napoleon had created a new decoration, the Order of the Green Banner, which he had conferred upon himself. In the general rejoicings the unfortunate affair of the banknotes was forgotten.

It was a few days later than this that the pigs came upon a case of whisky in the cellars of the farmhouse. It had been overlooked at the time when the house was first occupied. That night there came from the farmhouse the sound of loud singing, in which, to everyone's surprise, the strains of

'Beasts of England' were mixed up. At about half past nine Napoleon, wearing an old bowler hat of Mr. Jones's, was distinctly seen to emerge from the back door, gallop rapidly round the yard, and disappear indoors again. But in the morning a deep silence hung over the farmhouse. Not a pig appeared to be stirring. It was nearly nine o'clock when Squealer made his appearance, walking slowly and dejectedly, his eyes dull, his tail hanging limply behind him, and with every appearance of being seriously ill. He called the animals together and told them that he had a terrible piece of news to impart. Comrade Napoleon was dying!

A cry of lamentation went up. Straw was laid down outside the doors of the farmhouse, and the animals walked on tiptoe. With tears in their eyes they asked one another what they should do if their Leader were taken away from them. A rumour went round that Snowball had after all contrived to introduce poison into Napoleon's food. At eleven o'clock Squealer came out to make another announcement. As his last act upon earth, Comrade Napoleon had pronounced a solemn decree: the drinking of alcohol was to be punished by death.

By the evening, however, Napoleon appeared to be somewhat better, and the following morning Squealer was able to tell them that he was well on the way to recovery. By the evening of that day Napoleon was back at work, and on the next day it was learned that he had instructed Whymper to purchase in Willingdon some booklets on brewing and distilling. A week later Napoleon gave orders that the small paddock beyond the orchard, which it had previously been intended to set aside as a grazing-ground for animals who were past work, was to be ploughed up. It was given out that the

pasture was exhausted and needed re-seeding; but it soon became known that Napoleon intended to sow it with barley.

About this time there occurred a strange incident which hardly anyone was able to understand. One night at about twelve o'clock there was a loud crash in the yard, and the animals rushed out of their stalls. It was a moonlit night. At the foot of the end wall of the big barn, where the Seven Commandments were written, there lay a ladder broken in two pieces. Squealer, temporarily stunned, was sprawling beside it, and near at hand there lay a lantern, a paint-brush, and an overturned pot of white paint. The dogs immediately made a ring round Squealer, and escorted him back to the farmhouse as soon as he was able to walk. None of the animals could form any idea as to what this meant, except old Benjamin, who nodded his muzzle with a knowing air, and seemed to understand, but would say nothing.

But a few days later Muriel, reading over the Seven Commandments to herself, noticed that there was yet another of them which the animals had remembered wrong. They had thought the Fifth Commandment was "No animal shall drink alcohol," but there were two words that they had forgotten. Actually the Commandment read: "No animal shall drink alcohol TO EXCESS."

几天以后,这次行刑引起的恐慌已经平息下来后,有些动物才想起了第六条诫律中已经规定:“任何动物不得伤害其他动物”,至少他们自以为记得有这条规定。尽管在提起这个话题时,谁也不愿让猪和狗听见,但他们还是觉得这次杀戮与这一条诫律不相符。克拉弗请求本杰明给她念一下第六条诫律,而本杰明却像往常一样说他不愿介入这类事情。她又找来穆丽尔。穆丽尔就给她念了,上面写着:“任何动物不得伤害其他动物而无缘无故”。对后面这五个字,动物们不知怎么回事就是不记得了。但他们现在却清楚地看到,杀掉那些与斯诺鲍串通一气的叛徒是有充分根据的,它并没有违犯诫律。

整整这一年,动物们比前些年干得更加卖力。重建风车,不但要把墙筑得比上一次厚一倍,还要按预定日期完成;再加上庄园里那些日常性活计,这两项合在一起,任务十分繁重。对动物来说,他们已经不止一次感觉到,现在干活时间比琼斯时期长,吃得却并不比那时强。每到星期天早上,斯奎拉蹄子上就捏着一张长纸条,向他们发布各类食物产量增加的一系列数据,根据内容分门别类,有的增加了百分之二百,有的增加了百分之三百或者百分之五百。动物们觉得没有任何理由不相信他,尤其是因为他们再也记不清楚起义前的情形到底是什么样了。不过,他们常常觉得,宁愿要这些数字少一些,而吃得更多些。

现在所有的命令都是通过斯奎拉,或者另外一头猪发布的。拿破仑自己则两星期也难得露一次面。一旦他要出来了,他就不仅要带着狗侍卫,而且还要有一只黑色小公鸡,象号手一样在前面开道。在拿破仑讲话之前,公鸡先要响亮地啼叫一下“喔——喔——喔!”据说,这是在庄主院,拿破仑也和别的猪分开居住的。用他在两头狗的侍侯下独自用餐,而且还总要德贝陶瓷餐具用餐,那些餐具原来陈列在客厅的玻璃橱柜里。另外,有通告说,每年逢拿破仑生日也要鸣枪,就向其他两个纪念日一样。

如今,对拿破仑给不能简单地直呼“拿破仑”了。提到他就要用正式的尊称:“我们的领袖拿破仑同志”,而那些猪还喜欢给他冠以这样一些头衔,如“动物之父”,“人类克星”,“的羊保护神”,“鸭子的至亲”等等。斯奎拉每次演讲时,总要泪流满面地大谈一番拿破仑的智慧和他的好心肠,说他对普天之下的动物,尤其是对那些还不幸地生活在其它庄园里的受歧视和受奴役的动物,满怀着深挚的爱等等。在庄园里,把每遇到一件幸运之事,每取得一项成就的荣誉归于拿破仑已成了家常便饭。你会常常听到一只鸡对另一只鸡这样讲道:“在我们的领袖拿破仑的指引下,我在六天之内下了五只蛋”,或者两头正在饮水的牛声称:“多亏拿破仑同志的领导,这水喝起来真甜!”庄园里的动物们的整个精神状态,充分体现在一首名为“拿破仑同志”的诗中,诗是梅尼缪斯编写的,全诗如下:

孤儿之至亲!

辛福之源泉!

赐给食料的的恩主!

您双目坚毅沉静

如日当空,

仰着看您

啊!我满怀激情

拿破仑同志!

是您赐予

您那众生灵所期求之一切,

每日两餐饱食,

还有那洁净的草垫,

每个动物不论大小,

都在窝棚中平静歇睡,

因为有您在照看,

拿破仑同志!

我要是有头幼崽,

在他长大以前,

哪怕他小得像奶瓶、像小桶,

他也应学会

用忠诚和老实待您,

放心吧,

他的第一声尖叫肯定是

“拿破仑同志!”

拿破仑对这首诗很满意,并让手下把它刻在大谷仓的墙上,位于与“七诫”相对的另一头。诗的上方是拿破仑的一幅侧身画像,是斯奎拉用白漆画成的。

在这期间,由温普尔牵线,拿破仑正着手与弗雷德里克及皮尔金顿进行一系列繁冗的谈判。那堆木材至今还没有卖掉。在这两个人中,弗雷德里克更急着要买,但他又不愿意出一个公道的价钱。与此同时,有一个过时的消息重新开始流传,说弗雷德里克和他的伙计们正在密谋袭击动物庄园,并想把那个他嫉恨已久的风车毁掉,据说斯诺鲍就藏在平彻菲尔德庄园。仲夏时节,动物们又惊讶地听说,另外有三只鸡也主动坦白交待,说他们曾受斯诺鲍的煽动,参与过一起刺杀拿破仑的阴谋。那三只鸡立即被处决了,随后,为了拿破仑的安全起见,又采取了新的戒备措施,夜间有四条狗守卫着他的床,每个床脚一条狗,一头名叫平克埃的猪,接受了在拿破仑吃饭前品尝他的食物的任务,以防食物有毒。

差不多同时,有通知说拿破仑决定把那堆木材卖给皮尔金顿先生;他还拟订一项关于动物庄园和福克斯伍德庄园交换某些产品的长期协议。尽管是通过温普尔牵线,但拿破仑和皮尔金顿现在的关系可以说是相当不错的。对于皮尔金顿这个人,动物们并不信任。但他们更不信任弗雷德里克,他们对他又怕又恨。夏天过去了,风车即将竣工,那个关于弗雷德里克将要袭击庄园的风声也越来越紧。据说危险已经迫在眉睫,而且,弗雷德里克打算带二十个全副武装的人来,还说他已经买通了地方官员和警察,这样,一旦他能把动物庄园的地契弄到手,就会得到他们的认可。更有甚者,从平彻菲尔德庄园透露出许多可怕的消息,说弗雷德里克正用他的动物进行残酷无情的演习。他用鞭子抽死了一匹老马,饿他的牛,还把一条狗扔到炉子里烧死了,到了晚上,他就把刮脸刀碎片绑在鸡爪子上看斗鸡取乐。听到这些正加害在他们同志身上的事,动物们群情激愤,热血沸腾,他们不时叫嚷着要一起去进攻平彻菲尔德庄园,赶走那里的人,解放那里的动物。但斯奎拉告诫动物们,要避免草率行动,要相信拿破仑的战略布署。

尽管如此,反对弗雷德里克的情绪还是越来越高涨。在一个星期天早上,拿破仑来到大谷仓,他解释说他从来未打算把那堆木料卖给弗雷德里克。他说,和那个恶棍打交道有辱他的身份。为了向外传播起义消息而放出去的鸽子,以后不准在福克斯伍德庄园落脚。他还下令,把他们以前的口号“打倒人类”换成“打倒弗雷德里克”。夏末,斯诺鲍的另一个阴谋又被揭露了,麦田里长满了杂草,原来发现是他在某个夜晚潜入庄园后,往粮种里拌了草籽。一只与此事件有牵连的雄鸡向斯奎拉坦白了这一罪行,随后,他就吞食了剧毒草莓自尽了。动物们现在还得知,和他们一直想像的情况正相反,斯诺鲍从来都没有受到过“一级动物英雄”嘉奖。受奖的事只不过是在牛棚大战后,斯诺鲍自己散布的一个神话。根本就没有给他授勋这回事,倒是因为他在战斗中表现怯懦而早就受到谴责。有些动物又一次感到不好接受,但斯奎拉很快就使他们相信是他们记错了。

到了秋天,动物们在保证完成收割的情况下,竭尽全力,终于使风车竣工了,而且几乎是和收割同时完成的。接下来还得安装机器,温普尔正在为购买机器的事而奔忙,但是到此为止,风车主体已经建成。且不说他们经历的每一步如何困难,不管他们的经验多么不足,工具多么原始,运气多么不佳,斯诺鲍的诡计多么阴险,整个工程到此已经一丝不差按时竣工了!动物们精疲力尽,但却倍感自豪,他们绕着他们自己的这一杰作不停地转来转去。在他们眼里,风车比第一次筑得漂亮多了,另外,墙座也比第一次的厚一倍。这一次,除了炸药,什么东西都休想摧毁它们!回想起来,他们为此不知流过多少血和汗,又克服了不知多少个困难,但是一想到一旦当风车的翼板转动就能带动发电机,就会给他们的生活带来巨大的改观,——想到这前前后后的一切,他们于是就忘却了疲劳,而且还一边得意地狂呼着,一边围着风车雀跃不已。拿破仑在狗和公鸡的前呼后拥下,亲自莅临视察,并亲自对动物们的成功表示祝贺,还宣布,这个风车要命名为“拿破仑风车”。

两天后,动物们被召集到大谷仓召开一次特别会议。拿破仑宣布,他已经把那堆木料卖给了弗雷德里克,再过一天,弗雷德里克就要来拉货。顿时,动物们一个个都惊得目瞪口呆。在整个这段时间里,拿破仑只是与皮尔金顿表面上友好而已,实际上他已和弗雷德里克达成了秘密协议。

与福克斯伍德庄园的关系已经完全破裂了,他们就向皮尔金顿发出了侮辱信,并通知鸽子以后要避开平彻菲尔德庄园,还把“打倒弗雷德里克”的口号改为“打倒皮尔金顿”。同时,拿破仑断然地告诉动物们说,所谓动物庄园面临着一个迫在眉睫的袭击的说法是彻头彻尾的谎言,还有,有关弗雷德里克虐待他的动物的谣传,也是被严重地夸张了的。所有的谣言都极可能来自斯诺鲍及其同伙。总之,现在看来斯诺鲍并没有藏在平彻菲尔德庄园。事实上他生平从来没有到过那儿,他正住在福克斯伍德庄园,据说生活得相当奢侈。而且多年来,他一直就是皮尔金顿门下的一个地地道道的食客。

猪无不为拿破仑的老练欣喜若狂。他表面上与皮尔金顿友好,这就迫使弗雷德里克把价钱提高了十二英镑。斯奎拉说,拿破仑思想上的卓越之处,实际上就体现在他对任何人都不信任上,即使对弗雷德里克也是如此。弗雷德里克曾打算用一种叫做支票的东西支付木料钱,那玩意儿差不多只是一张纸,只不过写着保证支付之类的诺言而已,但拿破仑根本不是他能糊弄得了的,他要求用真正的五英镑票子付款,而且要在运木料之前交付。弗雷德里克已经如数付清,所付的数目刚好够为大风车买机器用。

这期间,木料很快就被拉走了,等全部拉完之后,在大谷仓里又召开了一次特别会议,让动物们观赏弗雷德里克付给的钞票。拿破仑笑逐颜开,心花怒放,他戴着他的两枚勋章,端坐在那个凸出的草垫子上,钱就在他身边,整齐地堆放在从庄主院厨房里拿来的瓷盘子上。动物们排成一行慢慢走过,无不大饱眼福。鲍克瑟还伸出鼻子嗅了嗅那钞票,随着他的呼吸,还激起了一股稀稀的白末屑和嘶嘶作响声。

三天以后,在一阵震耳的嘈杂声中,只见温普尔骑着自行车飞快赶来,面色如死人一般苍白。他把自行车在院子里就地一扔,就径直冲进庄主院。过来一会,就在拿破仑的房间里响起一阵哽噎着嗓子的怒吼声。出事了,这消息象野火一般传遍整个庄园。钞票是假的!弗雷德里克白白地拉走了木料!

拿破仑立即把所有动物召集在一起,咬牙切齿地宣布,判处弗雷德里克死刑。他说,要是抓住这家伙,就要把他活活煮死。同时他告诫他们,继这个阴险的背信弃义的行动之后,最糟糕的事情也就会一触即发了。弗雷德里克和他的同伙随时都可能发动他们蓄谋已久的袭击。因此,已在所有通向庄园的路口安装了岗哨。另外,四只鸽子给福克斯伍德庄园送去和好的信件,希望与皮尔金顿重修旧好。

就在第二天早晨,敌人开始袭击了。当时动物们正在吃早饭,哨兵飞奔来报,说弗雷德里克及其随从已经走进了五栅门。动物们勇气十足,立刻就向敌人迎头出击,但这一回他们可没有像牛棚大战那样轻易取胜。敌方这一次共有十五个人,六条枪,他们一走到距离五十码处就立刻开火。可怕的枪声和恶毒的子弹使动物们无法抵挡,虽然拿破仑和鲍克瑟好不容易才把他们集结起来,可不一会儿他们就又被打退了回来。很多动物已经负伤。于是他们纷纷逃进庄园的窝棚里躲了起来,小心翼翼地透过墙缝,透过木板上的节疤孔往外窥探。只见整个大牧场,还有风车,都已落到敌人手中。此时就连拿破仑似乎也已不知所措了。他一言不发,走来走去,尾巴变得僵硬,而且还不停抽搐着。他不时朝着福克斯伍德庄园方向瞥去渴望的眼光。如果皮尔金顿和他手下的人帮他们一把的话,这场拼斗还可以打胜。但正在此刻,前一天派出的四只鸽子返回来了,其中有一只带着皮尔金顿的一张小纸片。纸上用铅笔写着:“你们活该。”

这时,弗雷德里克一伙人已停在风车周围。动物们一边窥视着他们,一边惶恐不安地嘀咕起来,有两个人拿出一根钢钎和一把大铁锤,他们准备拆除风车。

“不可能!”拿破仑喊道,“我们已把墙筑得那么厚。他们休想在一星期内拆除。不要怕,同志们!”

但本杰明仍在急切地注视着那些人的活动。拿着钢钎和大铁锤的两个人,正在风车的地基附近打孔。最后,本杰明带着几乎是戏谑的神情,慢腾腾地呶了呶他那长长的嘴巴。

“我看是这样”他说,“你们没看见他们在干什么吗?过一会儿,他们就要往打好的孔里装炸药。”

太可怕了。但此时此刻,动物们不敢冒险冲出窝棚,他们只好等待着。过了几分钟,眼看着那些人朝四下散开,接着,就是一声震耳欲聋的爆炸声。顿时,鸽子就立刻飞到空中,其它动物,除了拿破仑外,全都转过脸去,猛地趴倒在地。他们起来后,风车上空飘荡着一团巨大的黑色烟云。微风慢慢吹散了烟云:风车已荡然无存!

看到这情景,动物们又重新鼓起勇气。他们在片刻之前所感到的胆怯和恐惧,此刻便被这种可耻卑鄙的行为所激起的狂怒淹没了。他们发出一阵强烈的复仇呐喊,不等下一步的命令,便一齐向敌人冲去。这一次,他们顾不上留意那如冰雹一般扫射而来的残忍的子弹了。这是一场残酷、激烈的战斗。那帮人在不断地射击,等到动物们接近他们时,他们就又用棍棒和那沉重的靴子大打出手。一头牛、三只羊、两只鹅被杀害了,几乎每个动物都受了伤。就连一直在后面指挥作战的拿破仑也被子弹削去了尾巴尖。但人也并非没有伤亡。三个人的头被鲍克瑟的蹄掌打破;另一个人的肚子被一头牛的犄角刺破;还有一个人,裤子几乎被杰西和布鲁拜尔撕掉,给拿破仑作贴身警卫的那九条狗,奉他的命令在树篱的遮掩下迂回过去,突然出现在敌人的侧翼,凶猛地吼叫起来,把那帮人吓坏了。他们发现有被包围的危险,弗雷德里克趁退路未断便喊他的同伙撤出去,不一会儿,那些贪生怕死的敌人便没命似地逃了。动物们一直把他们追到庄园边上,在他们从那片树篱中挤出去时,还踢了他们最后几下。

他们胜利了,但他们都已是疲惫不堪,鲜血淋漓。它们一瘸一拐地朝庄园缓缓地走回。看到横在草地上的同志们的尸体,有的动物悲伤得眼泪汪汪。他们在那个曾矗立着风车的地方肃穆地站了好长时间。的的确确,风车没了;他们劳动的最后一点印迹几乎也没了!甚至地基也有一部分被炸毁,而且这一下,要想再建风车,也非同上一次可比了。上一次还可以利用剩下的石头。可这一次连石头也不见了。爆炸的威力把石头抛到了几百码以外。好像这儿从未有过风车一样。

当他们走近庄园,斯奎拉朝他们蹦蹦跳跳地走过来,他一直莫名其妙地没有参加战斗,而此时却高兴得摇头摆尾。就在这时,动物们听到从庄园的窝棚那边传来祭典的鸣枪声。

“干嘛要开枪?”鲍克瑟问。

“庆祝我们的胜利!”斯奎拉囔道。

“什么胜利?”鲍克瑟问。他的膝盖还在流血,又丢了一只蹄铁,蹄子也绽裂了,另外还有十二颗子弹击中了他的后腿。

“什么胜利?同志们,难道我们没有从我们的领土上——从神圣的动物庄园的领土上赶跑敌人吗?”

“但他们毁了风车,而我们却为建风车干了两年!”

“那有什么?我们将另建一座。我们高兴的话就建它六座风车。同志们,你们不了解,我们已经干了一件多么了不起的事。敌人曾占领了我们脚下这块土地。而现在呢,多亏拿破仑同志的领导,我们重新夺回了每一吋土地!”

“然而我们夺回的只是我们本来就有的,”鲍克瑟又说道。

“这就是我们的胜利,”斯奎拉说。

他们一瘸一拐地走进大院。鲍克瑟腿皮下的子弹使他疼痛难忍。他知道,摆在他面前的工作,将是一项从地基开始再建风车的沉重劳动,他还想像他自己已经为这项任务振作了起来。但是,他第一次想到,他已十一岁了。他那强壮的肌体也许是今非昔比了。

但当动物们看到那面绿旗在飘扬,听到再次鸣枪——共响了七下,听到拿破仑的讲话,听到他对他们的行动的祝贺,他们似乎觉得,归根到底,他们取得了巨大的胜利。大家为在战斗中死难的动物安排了一个隆重的葬礼。鲍克瑟和克拉弗拉着灵车,拿破仑亲自走在队列的前头。整整两天用来举行庆祝活动,有唱歌,有演讲,还少不了鸣枪,每一个牲口都得了一只作为特殊纪念物的苹果,每只家禽得到了二盎司谷子,每条狗有三块饼干。有通知说,这场战斗将命名为风车战役,拿破仑还设立了一个新勋章“绿旗勋章”,并授予了他自己。在这一片欢天喜地之中,那个不幸的钞票事件也就被忘掉了。

庆祝活动过后几天,猪偶然在庄主院的地下室里,发现了一箱威士忌,这在他们刚住进这里时没注意到。当天晚上,从庄主院那边传出一阵响亮的歌声,令动物们惊奇的是,中间还夹杂着“英格兰兽”的旋律。大约在九点半左右,只见拿破仑戴着一顶琼斯先生的旧圆顶礼帽,从后门出来,在院子里飞快地跑了一圈,又闪进门不见了。但在第二天早晨,庄主院内却是一片沉寂,看不到一头猪走动,快到九点钟时,斯奎拉出来了,迟缓而沮丧地走着,目光呆滞,尾巴无力地掉在身后,浑身上下病怏怏的。他把动物们叫到一起,说还要传达一个沉痛的消息:拿破仑同志病危!

一阵哀嚎油然而起。庄主院门外铺着草甸,于是,动物们踮着蹄尖从那儿走过。他们眼中含着热泪,相互之间总是询问:要是他们的领袖拿破仑离开了,他们可该怎么办。庄园里此刻到处都在风传,说斯诺鲍最终还是设法把毒药掺到拿破仑的食物中了。十一点,斯奎拉出来发布另一项公告,说是拿破仑同志在弥留之际宣布了一项神圣的法令:饮酒者要处死刑。

可是到了傍晚,拿破仑显得有些好转,次日早上,斯奎拉就告诉他们说拿破仑正在顺利康复。即日夜晚,拿破仑又重新开始工作了。又过了一天,动物们才知道,他早先让温普尔在威灵顿买了一些有关蒸馏及酿造酒类方面的小册子。一周后,拿破仑下令,叫把苹果园那边的小牧场耕锄掉。那牧场原先是打算为退休动物留作草场用的,现在却说牧草已耗尽,需要重新耕种;但不久以后便真相大白了,拿破仑准备在那儿播种大麦。

大概就在这时,发生了一件奇怪的事情,几乎每个动物都百思不得其解。这事发生在一天夜里十二点钟左右,当时,院子里传来一声巨大的跌撞声,动物们都立刻冲出窝棚去看。那个夜晚月光皎洁,在大谷仓一头写着“七诫”的墙角下,横着一架断为两截的梯子。斯奎拉平躺在梯子边上,一时昏迷不醒。他手边有一盏马灯,一把漆刷子,一只打翻的白漆桶。狗当即就把斯奎拉围了起来,待他刚刚苏醒过来,马上就护送他回到了庄主院。除了本杰明以外,动物们都想不通这是怎么回事。本杰明呶了呶他那长嘴巴,露出一副会意了的神情,似乎看出点眉目来了,但却啥也没说。

但是几天后,穆丽尔自己在看到七诫时注意到,又有另外一条诫律动物们都记错了,他们本来以为,第五条诫律是“任何动物不得饮酒”,但有两个字他们都忘了,实际上那条诫律是“任何动物不得饮酒过度”。