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All that year the animals worked like slaves. But they were happy in their work; they grudged no effort or sacrifice, well aware that everything that they did was for the benefit of themselves and those of their kind who would come after them, and not for a pack of idle, thieving human beings.

Throughout the spring and summer they worked a sixty-hour week, and in August Napoleon announced that there would be work on Sunday afternoons as well. This work was strictly voluntary, but any animal who absented himself from it would have his rations reduced by half. Even so, it was found necessary to leave certain tasks undone. The harvest was a little less successful than in the previous year, and two fields which should have been sown with roots in the early summer were not sown because the ploughing had not been completed early enough. It was possible to foresee that the coming winter would be a hard one.

The windmill presented unexpected difficulties. There was a good quarry of limestone on the farm, and plenty of sand and cement had been found in one of the outhouses, so that all the materials for building were at hand. But the problem the animals could not at first solve was how to break up the stone into pieces of suitable size. There seemed no way of doing this except with picks and crowbars, which no animal could use, because no animal could stand on his hind legs. Only after weeks of vain effort did the right idea occur to somebody-namely, to utilise the force of gravity. Huge boulders, far too big to be used as they were, were lying all over the bed of the quarry. The animals lashed ropes round these, and then all together, cows, horses, sheep, any animal that could lay hold of the rope--even the pigs sometimes joined in at critical moments--they dragged them with desperate slowness up the slope to the top of the quarry, where they were toppled over the edge, to shatter to pieces below. Transporting the stone when it was once broken was comparatively simple. The horses carried it off in cart-loads, the sheep dragged single blocks, even Muriel and Benjamin yoked themselves into an old governess-cart and did their share. By late summer a sufficient store of stone had accumulated, and then the building began, under the superintendence of the pigs.

But it was a slow, laborious process. Frequently it took a whole day of exhausting effort to drag a single boulder to the top of the quarry, and sometimes when it was pushed over the edge it failed to break. Nothing could have been achieved without Boxer, whose strength seemed equal to that of all the rest of the animals put together. When the boulder began to slip and the animals cried out in despair at finding themselves dragged down the hill, it was always Boxer who strained himself against the rope and brought the boulder to a stop. To see him toiling up the slope inch by inch, his breath coming fast, the tips of his hoofs clawing at the ground, and his great sides matted with sweat, filled everyone with admiration. Clover warned him sometimes to be careful not to overstrain himself, but Boxer would never listen to her. His two slogans, "I will work harder" and "Napoleon is always right," seemed to him a sufficient answer to all problems. He had made arrangements with the cockerel to call him three-quarters of an hour earlier in the mornings instead of half an hour. And in his spare moments, of which there were not many nowadays, he would go alone to the quarry, collect a load of broken stone, and drag it down to the site of the windmill unassisted.

The animals were not badly off throughout that summer, in spite of the hardness of their work. If they had no more food than they had had in Jones's day, at least they did not have less. The advantage of only having to feed themselves, and not having to support five extravagant human beings as well, was so great that it would have taken a lot of failures to outweigh it. And in many ways the animal method of doing things was more efficient and saved labour. Such jobs as weeding, for instance, could be done with a thoroughness impossible to human beings. And again, since no animal now stole, it was unnecessary to fence off pasture from arable land, which saved a lot of labour on the upkeep of hedges and gates. Nevertheless, as the summer wore on, various unforeseen shortages began to make them selves felt. There was need of paraffin oil, nails, string, dog biscuits, and iron for the horses' shoes, none of which could be produced on the farm. Later there would also be need for seeds and artificial manures, besides various tools and, finally, the machinery for the windmill. How these were to be procured, no one was able to imagine.

One Sunday morning, when the animals assembled to receive their orders, Napoleon announced that he had decided upon a new policy. From now onwards Animal Farm would engage in trade with the neighbouring farms: not, of course, for any commercial purpose, but simply in order to obtain certain materials which were urgently necessary. The needs of the windmill must override everything else, he said. He was therefore making arrangements to sell a stack of hay and part of the current year's wheat crop, and later on, if more money were needed, it would have to be made up by the sale of eggs, for which there was always a market in Willingdon. The hens, said Napoleon, should welcome this sacrifice as their own special contribution towards the building of the windmill.

Once again the animals were conscious of a vague uneasiness. Never to have any dealings with human beings, never to engage in trade, never to make use of money--had not these been among the earliest resolutions passed at that first triumphant Meeting after Jones was expelled? All the animals remembered passing such resolutions: or at least they thought that they remembered it. The four young pigs who had protested when Napoleon abolished the Meetings raised their voices timidly, but they were promptly silenced by a tremendous growling from the dogs. Then, as usual, the sheep broke into "Four legs good, two legs bad!" and the momentary awkwardness was smoothed over. Finally Napoleon raised his trotter for silence and announced that he had already made all the arrangements. There would be no need for any of the animals to come in contact with human beings, which would clearly be most undesirable. He intended to take the whole burden upon his own shoulders. A Mr. Whymper, a solicitor living in Willingdon, had agreed to act as intermediary between Animal Farm and the outside world, and would visit the farm every Monday morning to receive his instructions. Napoleon ended his speech with his usual cry of "Long live Animal Farm!" and after the singing of 'Beasts of England' the animals were dismissed.

Afterwards Squealer made a round of the farm and set the animals' minds at rest. He assured them that the resolution against engaging in trade and using money had never been passed, or even suggested. It was pure imagination, probably traceable in the beginning to lies circulated by Snowball. A few animals still felt faintly doubtful, but Squealer asked them shrewdly, "Are you certain that this is not something that you have dreamed, comrades? Have you any record of such a resolution? Is it written down anywhere?" And since it was certainly true that nothing of the kind existed in writing, the animals were satisfied that they had been mistaken.

Every Monday Mr. Whymper visited the farm as had been arranged. He was a sly-looking little man with side whiskers, a solicitor in a very small way of business, but sharp enough to have realised earlier than anyone else that Animal Farm would need a broker and that the commissions would be worth having. The animals watched his coming and going with a kind of dread, and avoided him as much as possible. Nevertheless, the sight of Napoleon, on all fours, delivering orders to Whymper, who stood on two legs, roused their pride and partly reconciled them to the new arrangement. Their relations with the human race were now not quite the same as they had been before. The human beings did not hate Animal Farm any less now that it was prospering; indeed, they hated it more than ever. Every human being held it as an article of faith that the farm would go bankrupt sooner or later, and, above all, that the windmill would be a failure. They would meet in the public-houses and prove to one another by means of diagrams that the windmill was bound to fall down, or that if it did stand up, then that it would never work. And yet, against their will, they had developed a certain respect for the efficiency with which the animals were managing their own affairs. One symptom of this was that they had begun to call Animal Farm by its proper name and ceased to pretend that it was called the Manor Farm. They had also dropped their championship of Jones, who had given up hope of getting his farm back and gone to live in another part of the county. Except through Whymper, there was as yet no contact between Animal Farm and the outside world, but there were constant rumours that Napoleon was about to enter into a definite business agreement either with Mr. Pilkington of Foxwood or with Mr. Frederick of Pinchfield--but never, it was noticed, with both simultaneously.

It was about this time that the pigs suddenly moved into the farmhouse and took up their residence there. Again the animals seemed to remember that a resolution against this had been passed in the early days, and again Squealer was able to convince them that this was not the case. It was absolutely necessary, he said, that the pigs, who were the brains of the farm, should have a quiet place to work in. It was also more suited to the dignity of the Leader (for of late he had taken to speaking of Napoleon under the title of "Leader") to live in a house than in a mere sty. Nevertheless, some of the animals were disturbed when they heard that the pigs not only took their meals in the kitchen and used the drawing-room as a recreation room, but also slept in the beds. Boxer passed it off as usual with "Napoleon is always right!", but Clover, who thought she remembered a definite ruling against beds, went to the end of the barn and tried to puzzle out the Seven Commandments which were inscribed there. Finding herself unable to read more than individual letters, she fetched Muriel.

"Muriel," she said, "read me the Fourth Commandment. Does it not say something about never sleeping in a bed?"

With some difficulty Muriel spelt it out.

"It says, 'No animal shall sleep in a bed with sheets,"' she announced finally.

Curiously enough, Clover had not remembered that the Fourth Commandment mentioned sheets; but as it was there on the wall, it must have done so. And Squealer, who happened to be passing at this moment, attended by two or three dogs, was able to put the whole matter in its proper perspective.

"You have heard then, comrades," he said, "that we pigs now sleep in the beds of the farmhouse? And why not? You did not suppose, surely, that there was ever a ruling against beds? A bed merely means a place to sleep in. A pile of straw in a stall is a bed, properly regarded. The rule was against sheets, which are a human invention. We have removed the sheets from the farmhouse beds, and sleep between blankets. And very comfortable beds they are too! But not more comfortable than we need, I can tell you, comrades, with all the brainwork we have to do nowadays. You would not rob us of our repose, would you, comrades? You would not have us too tired to carry out our duties? Surely none of you wishes to see Jones back?"

The animals reassured him on this point immediately, and no more was said about the pigs sleeping in the farmhouse beds. And when, some days afterwards, it was announced that from now on the pigs would get up an hour later in the mornings than the other animals, no complaint was made about that either.

By the autumn the animals were tired but happy. They had had a hard year, and after the sale of part of the hay and corn, the stores of food for the winter were none too plentiful, but the windmill compensated for everything. It was almost half built now. After the harvest there was a stretch of clear dry weather, and the animals toiled harder than ever, thinking it well worth while to plod to and fro all day with blocks of stone if by doing so they could raise the walls another foot. Boxer would even come out at nights and work for an hour or two on his own by the light of the harvest moon. In their spare moments the animals would walk round and round the half-finished mill, admiring the strength and perpendicularity of its walls and marvelling that they should ever have been able to build anything so imposing. Only old Benjamin refused to grow enthusiastic about the windmill, though, as usual, he would utter nothing beyond the cryptic remark that donkeys live a long time.

November came, with raging south-west winds. Building had to stop because it was now too wet to mix the cement. Finally there came a night when the gale was so violent that the farm buildings rocked on their foundations and several tiles were blown off the roof of the barn. The hens woke up squawking with terror because they had all dreamed simultaneously of hearing a gun go off in the distance. In the morning the animals came out of their stalls to find that the flagstaff had been blown down and an elm tree at the foot of the orchard had been plucked up like a radish. They had just noticed this when a cry of despair broke from every animal's throat. A terrible sight had met their eyes. The windmill was in ruins.

With one accord they dashed down to the spot. Napoleon, who seldom moved out of a walk, raced ahead of them all. Yes, there it lay, the fruit of all their struggles, levelled to its foundations, the stones they had broken and carried so laboriously scattered all around. Unable at first to speak, they stood gazing mournfully at the litter of fallen stone. Napoleon paced to and fro in silence, occasionally snuffing at the ground. His tail had grown rigid and twitched sharply from side to side, a sign in him of intense mental activity. Suddenly he halted as though his mind were made up.

"Comrades," he said quietly, "do you know who is responsible for this? Do you know the enemy who has come in the night and overthrown our windmill? SNOWBALL!" he suddenly roared in a voice of thunder. "Snowball has done this thing! In sheer malignity, thinking to set back our plans and avenge himself for his ignominious expulsion, this traitor has crept here under cover of night and destroyed our work of nearly a year. Comrades, here and now I pronounce the death sentence upon Snowball. 'Animal Hero, Second Class,' and half a bushel of apples to any animal who brings him to justice. A full bushel to anyone who captures him alive!"

The animals were shocked beyond measure to learn that even Snowball could be guilty of such an action. There was a cry of indignation, and everyone began thinking out ways of catching Snowball if he should ever come back. Almost immediately the footprints of a pig were discovered in the grass at a little distance from the knoll. They could only be traced for a few yards, but appeared to lead to a hole in the hedge. Napoleon snuffed deeply at them and pronounced them to be Snowball's. He gave it as his opinion that Snowball had probably come from the direction of Foxwood Farm.

"No more delays, comrades!" cried Napoleon when the footprints had been examined. "There is work to be done. This very morning we begin rebuilding the windmill, and we will build all through the winter, rain or shine. We will teach this miserable traitor that he cannot undo our work so easily. Remember, comrades, there must be no alteration in our plans: they shall be carried out to the day. Forward, comrades! Long live the windmill! Long live Animal Farm!"

那一年,动物们干起活来就像奴隶一样。但他们乐在其中,流血流汗甚至牺牲也心甘情愿,因为他们深深地意识到:他们干的每件事都是为他们自己和未来的同类的利益,而不是为了那帮游手好闲、偷摸成性的人类。

从初春到夏末这段时间里,他们每周工作六十个小时。到了八月,拿破仑又宣布,星期天下午也要安排工作。这项工作完全是自愿性的,不过,无论哪个动物缺勤,他的口粮就要减去一半。即使这样,大家还是发觉,有些活就是干不完。收获比去年要差一些,而且,因为耕作没有及早完成,本来应该在初夏播种薯类作物的两快地也没种成。可以预见,来冬将是一个艰难的季节。

风车的事引起了意外的难题。按说,庄园里就有一个质地很好的石灰石矿,又在一间小屋里发现了大量的沙子和水泥,这样,所有的建筑材料都已齐备。但问题是,动物们刚开始不知道如何才能把石头弄碎到适用的规格。似乎除了动用十字镐和撬棍外,没有别的办法。可是,动物们都不能用后腿站立,也就无法使用镐和撬棍。在他们徒劳几个星期之后,才有动物想出了一个好主意,就是利用重力的作用。再看那些巨大的圆石,虽然大都无法直接利用,但整个采石场上到处都是。于是,动物们用绳子绑住石头,然后,由牛、马、羊以及所有能抓住绳子的动物合在一起——甚至猪有时也在关键时刻搭个帮手——一起拖着石头,慢慢地、慢慢地沿着坡拖到矿顶。到了那儿,把石头从边上堆下去,在底下就摔成了碎块。这样一来,运送的事倒显得相对简一些了。马驾着满载的货车运送,羊则一块一块地拖,就连穆丽尔和本杰明也套上一辆旧两轮座车,贡献出了他们的力量。这样到了夏末,备用的石头便积累足了,接着,在猪的监督下,工程就破土动工了。

但是,整个采石过程在当时却进展缓慢,历尽艰辛。把一块圆石拖到矿顶,常常要竭尽全力干整整一天,有些时候,石头从崖上推下去了,却没有摔碎。要是没有鲍克瑟,没有他那几乎能与所有其他动物合在一起相匹敌的力气,恐怕什么事都干不成。每逢动物们发现圆石开始往下滑,他们自己正被拖下山坡而绝望地哭喊时,总是多亏鲍克瑟拉住了绳索才稳了下来。看着他蹄子尖紧扣着地面,一吋一吋吃力地爬着坡;看着他呼吸急促,巨大的身躯浸透了汗水,动物们无不满怀钦佩和赞叹。克拉弗常常告诫他小心点,不要劳累过度了,但他从不放在心上。对他来说,“我要更加努力工作”和“拿破仑同志永远正确”这两句口头禅足以回答所有的难题。他已同那只小公鸡商量好了,把原来每天早晨提前半小时叫醒他,改为提前三刻钟。同时,尽管近来业余时间并不多,但他仍要在空闲时间里,独自到采石场去,在没有任何帮手的情况下,装上一车碎石,拖去倒在风车的地基里。

这一夏季,尽管动物们工作得十分辛苦,他们的境况还不算太坏,虽然他们得到的饲料不比琼斯时期多,但至少也不比那时少。除了自己食用外,动物们不必去并供养那五个骄奢淫逸的人,这个优越性太显著了,它足以使许多不足之处显得不足为道。另外,动物们干活的方式,在许多情况下,不但效率高而且省力。比如锄草这类活,动物们可以干得完美无缺,而对人来说,这一点远远做不到。再说,如今的动物们都不偷不摸了,也就不必用篱笆把牧场和田地隔开,因此便省去了大量的维护树篱和栅栏的劳力。话虽如此,过了夏季,各种各样意料不到的缺欠就暴露出来了。庄园里需要煤油、钉子、线绳、狗食饼干以及马蹄上钉的铁掌等等,但庄园里又不出产这些东西。后来,又需要种子和人造化肥,还有各类工具以及风车用的机裓。可是,如何搞到这些东西,动物们就都想像不出了。

一个星期天早晨,当动物们集合起来接受任务时,拿破仑宣布,他已经决定了一项新政策。说是往后动物庄园将要同邻近的庄园做些交易,这当然不是为了任何商业目的,而是仅仅为了获得某些急需的物资。他说,为风车所需要的东西一定要不惜一切代价。因此,他正在准备出卖一堆干草和和当年的部分小麦收成,而且,再往后如果需要更多的钱的话,就得靠卖鸡蛋来补充了,因为鸡蛋在威灵顿总是有销路的。拿破仑还说,鸡应该高兴地看到,这一牺牲就是他们对建造风车的特殊贡献。

动物们再一次感到一种说不出的别扭。决不和人打交道,决不从事交易,决不使用钱,这些最早就有的誓言,在琼斯被逐后的第一次大会议上,不就已经确立了吗?订立这些誓言的情形至今都还历历在目;或者至少他们自以为还记得有这回事。那四只曾在拿破仑宣布废除大会议时提出抗议的幼猪胆怯地发言了,但在狗那可怕的咆哮声下,很快又不吱声了。接着,羊又照例咩咩地叫起“四条腿好,两条腿坏!”一时间的难堪局面也就顺利地对付过去了。最后,拿破仑抬起前蹄,平静一下气氛,宣布说他已经作好了全部安排,任何动物都不必介入和人打交道这种明显最为讨厌的事体中。而他有意把全部重担放在自己肩上。一个住在威灵顿的叫温普尔先生的律师,已经同意担当动物庄园和外部社会的中介人,并且将在每个星期一早晨来访以接受任务。最后,拿破仑照例喊一声:“动物庄园万岁!”就结束了整个讲话。接着,动物们在唱完“英格兰兽”后,纷纷散场离去。

后来,斯奎拉在庄园里转了一圈才使动物们安心下来。他向他们打保票说,反对从事交易和用钱的誓言从来没有通过过,搞不好连提议都不曾有过。这纯粹是臆想,追溯其根源,很可能是斯诺鲍散布的一个谎言。对此,一些动物还是半信半疑,斯奎拉就狡黠问他们:“你们敢肯定这不是你们梦到一些事吗?同志们!你们有任何关于这个誓约的记录吗?它写在哪儿了?”自然,这类东西都从没有见诸文字。因此,动物们便相信是他们自己搞错了。

那个温普尔是个律师,长着络腮胡子,矮个子,看上去一脸奸诈相。他经办的业务规模很小,但他却精明过人,早就看出了动物庄园会需要经纪人,并且佣金会很可观的。按协议,每个星期一温普尔都要来庄园一趟。动物们看着他来来去去,犹有几分畏惧,避之唯恐不及。不过,在他们这些四条腿的动物看来,拿破仑向靠两条腿站着的温普尔发号施令的情景,激发了他们的自豪,这在一定程度上也让他们感到这个新协议是顺心的。现在,他们同人类的关系确实今非昔比了。但是,人们对动物庄园的嫉恨不但没有因为它的兴旺而有所消解,反而恨之弥深。而且每个人都怀着这样一个信条:动物庄园迟早要破产,并且关键是,那个风车将是一堆废虚。他们在小酒店聚会,相互用图表论证说风车注定要倒塌;或者说,即便它能建成,那也永远运转不起来云云。虽然如此,他们对动物们管理自己庄园能力,也不由自主地刮目相看了。其中一个迹象就是,他们在称呼动物庄园时,不再故意叫它曼纳庄园,而开始用动物庄园这个名正言顺的名称。他们放弃了对琼斯的支持,而琼斯自己也已是万念俱焚,不再对重主他的庄园抱有希望,并且已经移居到国外另一个地方了。如今,多亏了这个温普尔,动物庄园才得以和外部社会接触,但是不断有小道消息说,拿破仑正准备同福克斯伍德的皮尔金顿先生,或者是平彻菲尔德的弗雷德里克先生签订一项明确的商业协议,不过还提到,这个协议永远不会同时和两家签订的。

大概就是在这个时候,猪突然搬进了庄主院,并且住在那里了。这一下,动物们又似乎想起了,有一条早先就立下的誓愿是反对这样做的。可斯奎拉又教他们认识到,事实并非如此。他说,猪是庄园的首脑,应该有一个安静的工作场所,这一点绝对必要。再说,对领袖(近来他在谈到拿破仑时,已经开始用“领袖”这一尊称)的尊严来说,住在房屋里要比住在纯粹的猪圈里更相称一些。尽管这样,在一听到猪不但在厨房里用餐,而且把客厅当作娱乐室占用了之后,还是有一些动物为此深感不安。鲍克瑟到蛮不在乎,照例说了一句“拿破仑同志永远正确。”但是克拉弗却认为她记得有一条反对床铺的诫律,她跑到大谷仓那里,试图从题写在那儿的“七诫”中找出答案。结果发现她自己连单个的字母都不认不过来。她便找来穆丽尔。

“穆丽尔”她说道,“你给我念一下第四条诫律,它是不是说决不睡在床上什么的?”

穆丽尔好不容易才拼读出来。

“它说,‘任何动物不得卧床铺盖被褥’,”她终于念道。

克拉弗觉得太突兀了,她从不记得第四条诫律提到过被褥,可它既然就写在墙上,那它一定本来就是这样。赶巧这时候,斯奎拉在两三条狗的陪伴下路过这儿,他能从特殊的角度来说明整个问题。

“那么,同志们,你们已经听到我们猪现在睡到庄主院床上的事了?为什么不呢?你们不想想,真的有过什么诫律反对床吗?床只不过是指一个睡觉的地方。如果正确看待的话,窝棚里的稻草堆就是一张床。这条诫律是反对被褥的,因为被褥是人类发明的。我们已经把庄主院床上的被褥全撤掉了,而睡在毯子里。它们也是多么舒服的床啊!可是同志们,我可以告诉你们,现在所有的脑力工作得靠我们来做,和我们所需要的程度相比,这些东西并不见得舒服多少。同志们,你们不会不让我们休息吧?你们不愿使我们过于劳累而失职吧?肯定你们谁都不愿意看到琼斯回来吧?”

在这一点上,动物们立刻就使他消除了疑虑,也不再说什么有关猪睡在庄主院床上的事了。而且数日之后,当宣布说,往后猪的起床时间要比其他动物晚一小时,也没有谁对此抱怨。

直到秋天,动物们都挺累的,却也愉快。说起来他们已经在艰难中熬过整整一年了,并且在卖了部分干草和玉米之后,准备过冬的饲料就根本不够用了,但是,风车补偿这一切,它这时差不多建到一半了。秋收以后,天气一直晴朗无雨,动物们干起活来比以前更勤快了。他们整天拖着石块,辛劳地来回奔忙。他们想着这样一来,便能在一天之内把墙又加高一呎了,因而是多么富有意义啊!鲍克瑟甚至在夜间也要出来,借着中秋的月光干上一两个小时。动物们则乐于在工余时间绕着进行了一半的工程走来走去,对于那墙壁的强度和垂直度赞叹一番。并为他们竟能修建如此了不起的工程而感到惊喜交加。唯独老本杰明对风车毫无热情,他如同往常一样,除了说驴都长寿这句话神乎其神的话之外,就再也无所表示了。

十二月到了,带来了猛烈的西北风。这时常常是雨天,没法和水泥,建造工程不得不中断。后来有一个夜晚,狂风大作,整个庄园里的窝棚从地基上都被摇撼了,大谷仓顶棚的一些瓦片也刮掉了。鸡群在恐惧中嘎嘎乱叫着惊醒来,因为他们在睡梦中同时听见远处在打枪。早晨,动物们走出窝棚,发现旗杆已被风吹倒,果园边上的一棵榆树也象萝卜一样被连根拔起。就在这个时候,所有的动物喉咙里突然爆发出一阵绝望的哭喊。一幅可怕的景象呈现在他们面前:风车毁了。

他们不约而同地冲向现场。很少外出散步的拿破仑,率先跑在最前头。是的,他们的全部奋斗成果躺在那儿了,全部夷为平地了,他们好不容易弄碎又拉来的石头四下散乱着。动物们心酸地凝视着倒塌下来的碎石块,一下子说不出话来。拿破仑默默地来回踱着步,偶尔在地面上闻一闻,他的尾巴变得僵硬,并且还忽左忽右急剧地抽动,对他来说,这是紧张思维活动的表现。突然,他不动了,似乎心里已有了主意。

“同志们,”他平静地说,“你们知道这是谁做的孽吗?那个昨晚来毁了我们风车的仇敌你们认识吗?斯诺鲍!”他突然用雷鸣般的嗓音吼道:“这是斯诺鲍干的!这个叛徒用心何其毒也,他摸黑爬到这儿,毁了我们近一年的劳动成果。他企图借此阻挠我们的计划,并为他可耻的被逐报复。同志们,此时此刻,我宣布判处斯诺鲍死刑。并给任何对他依法惩处的动物授予‘二级动物英雄’勋章和半莆式耳苹果,活捉他的动物将得到一整莆式耳苹果。”

动物们得知斯诺鲍竟能犯下如此罪行,无不感到十分愤慨。于是,他们在一阵怒吼之后,就开始想象如何在斯诺鲍再回来时捉住他。差不多就在同时,在离小山包不远的草地上,发现了猪蹄印。那些蹄印只能跟踪出几步远,但看上去是朝着树篱缺口方向的。拿破仑对着蹄印仔细地嗅了一番,便一口咬定那蹄印是斯诺鲍的,他个人认为斯诺鲍有可能是从福克斯伍德庄园方向来的。

“不要再迟疑了,同志们!”拿破仑在查看了蹄印后说道:“还有工作要干,我们正是要从今天早晨起,开始重建风车,而且经过这个冬天,我们要把它建成。风雨无阻。我们要让这个卑鄙的叛徒知道,他不能就这样轻而易举地破坏我们的工作。记住,同志们,我们的计划不仅不会有任何变更,反而要一丝不苟地实行下去。前进,同志们!风车万岁!动物庄园万岁!”