SECTION I : "MEDIAL t" BECOMES SOFT "D" {Counter #.....}

L1/S1-A

When "T" falls between two vowel sounds and when the syllable before the "T" is stressed, Americans pronounce it as a lightly tapped "D" instead of a "T."

- THE BEAUTIFUL BRITISH WRITER SCATTERED THE LETTERS.

BETTER, SISTER, GREATER, HITTER

Now try these additional "Medial T" drills which are not recorded on the tape.

sitting, sister, later, latest, greater, greatest, automatic, sixty, seventy, eighty, ninety, button, utmost, latter

L1/S1-B

The same thing happens when "T" falls after a vowel and before an "L." The "D" sound does not explode off the teeth but opens directly into the throat for the "L."

CATTLE, RATTLE, BATTLE, BOTTLE, SETTLE

And a few more:

kettle metal, mottled, fiddle, riddle

L1/S1-C

The same thing happens when the "T" falls after an "N" and before a vowel sound.

CENTER, RENTER, GRANTED

But notice that the "D" created in these words is softer and a bit closer to the teeth than the "Real D" in the words SENDER and RENDER.

Here are a few more to practice.

winter, Santa, granter, vented, fainted, printed

L1/S1-D

But be careful. A "medial T" will stay an exploded "T" sound when the following syllable (the syllable started by the "T") is stressed. ATTACH, ATTACK (as opposed to ATTIC) , ITALIAN (as opposed to ITALY), ATOMIC (as opposed to ATOM).

Now practice a few other medials which come before a stressed syllable and therefore retain an explosive "T."

retail, retain, auditorium, attempt, predatory, petition

More words,

AUTOMOBILE, MOMENTO, ATTITUDE, CITY, ETCETERA

SECTION II : THE "FINAL T" {Counter #......}

L1/S2-A

In American speech, the "final T" usually doesn't explode. The tongue hits the gum ridge (in the position for the "T" and just stays there.

HIT, HAT, WHAT, VISIT, CREDIT, HABIT, ABOUT, BOAT

And here are several more of these "Final T" words.

bait, wait, gate, feet, feet, greet, eat, sit, fit, permit, goat, coat

It's particularly important that the "final T" and the with TH or S, or T or other sounds formed when the tongue touches on or behind the teeth.

HIT THEM, GET SHOES, BET NUMBERS
HARDSHIP, COD LIVER OIL, HEAD SHRINKER

And a few other in the same category:

head south, bat the ball, hat size, bad situation, start singing

L1/S2-B

But, when "Final T" is followed by a word that begins with a vowel sound, it acts like a "Medial T" and becomes a soft "D."

- I DON'T GET IT.
RIGHT AWAY.
DINNER AT EIGHT.
- HIT IT OVER THE FENCE.

Now try these other "Linking T's" which aren't recorded on the tape.

 

- Get over here - a pot of gold - film at eleven - Please set it down. - That isn't it. - She's smart enough. - He sat on the chai - They got away.

L1/S2 - C

Another exception -- when "Final T" ends a consonant cluster (see Lesson # 3) and follows either an "N" or a voiceless consonant, you do need a very soft release of the "T" sound.

- GRANT, PLANT, TENT, POINT, COUNT
- INSIST, CAST, SHIFT, LIFT, ACT, RESPECT, SLEPT, KEPT

Now try these others:

hint. tint, sent, paint, punt, runt, haunt, wouldn't mist, fist, waist, gift, expect, sipped, last, boast, roast

L1/S2-D

Finally, the sounds "K" and "P" act almost the same way as the "T" when in medial position. They don't explode into the vowel. In fact, they tend to sound more like "G" and "B,"

- SOCCER, POCKET, PICKLE, TICKET, ACCURATE, ACTUAL
- TRACK IT, BACK OFF, A PACK OF GUMS, THE ATTACK OF...
- SUPPER, HAPPY, CAPTURE, CAPTAIN, PRINCIPLE, SIMPLE
- A SIP OF WATER, A MAP OF EUROPE, CREEP AROUND

Now try a few more which fall into this category.

back up, a sack of flour, the peak of health, pack it tightly, hop over, sip slowly, a cup of coffee, with his cap on